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Full text of "Randolph town reports"

Town of Randolph 
2012 Annual Town Report 




RANDOLPH TOWN COUNCIL 

Front row, left to right: Jason Adams, Paul J. Meoni, 

Vice President, Andrew Azer, President, and James F. Burgess 

Back row, left to right: Richard Brewer, Kenrick Clifton, 
Abigail Keane, Council Clerk, David C. Murphy, Town Manager 
Arthur Goldstein, and Paul K. Femandes 



FRONT COVER 



Families gather around the hot air balloon during the first Annua 
Harvest Hoopla held at Powers Farm on October 26th. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



In Memoriam 1 

Elected and Appointed Town Officers 3 

Town Council 6 

Town Manager 12 

Town Counsel 18 

Town Orders 20 

Superintendent of Schools 201 

Blue Hills Regional District School Committee 205 

Police Department 210 

Auxiliary Police 213 

Parking Clerk 214 

Fire Department 215 

Board of Health 219 

Public Health Nursing 224 

Norfolk County Mosquito Control Project 229 

Local Education Fund Committee 230 

Department of Public Works 231 

Inspectional Services Department 236 

Animal Control Officer 238 

Turner Free Library 239 

Trustees of the Turner Free Library 243 

Elder Affairs 244 

Veteran Services Department 246 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 249 

Historical Commission 250 

Trustees of Stetson School Fund 252 

Community Preservation Committee 254 

Recreation Department 257 

Planning Board 260 

Town Clerk and Registrar 261 

Board of Assessors 263 

Treasurer/Collector 265 

Norfolk County Registry of Deeds 266 

2012 Winterfest 269 

School Salaries 273 

Town Salaries 287 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/randolphtownrepo2012unse 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

IN MEMORIAM 

John C. Fucile, former Youth Center Director, volunteer Meals on Wheels 

James Clancy, retired Police Officer 

Dorothea Delano, retired Board of Health clerk 

Ann Griffin, retired School Cafeteria 

John J. FitzGibbons, retired Collector-Treasurer 

Alfred Potter, retired Firefighter 

Thomas W. O'Dea, retired Town Engineer 

G. Frances Moriarty, retired Town Treasurer 

Paul Anderson, retired Deputy Fire Chief 

Bemice Toole, School Dept. 

Albert Karsay, retired Police Sergeant 

Paul Kelly, retired School Teacher 

Albert Sumption, retired School Custodian 

Phyllis Cotter, retired secretary School Department 

K-9 Officer Nero, Police Department 

Blair Stymest, retired Deputy Fire Chief 

William LeVangie, Board of Registrars 

Ida Richardson, School Department Day Care 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




K-9 Nero passed away in September after a brief illness. 
A sign was erected in his honor at the newly constructed Randolph Dog Park 




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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



2012 ELECTED AND APPOINTED TOWN OFFICERS 



Town Council 


Town Manager 


William Alexopoulos 


David C. Murphy 


James F. Burgess, Jr. 




Andrew Azer 


Town Counsel 


Richard Brewer 


Robert F. Sullivan 


Kenrick Clifton 




Paul K. Fernandes 


Town Accountant 


Arthur Goldstein 


Vacancy (Stephen Toomey retired) 


Paul J. Meoni 




Jason Adams 






Registrars of Voters 


Town Clerk/Registrar 


Vacancy 


Brian P. Howard 


James D. Curtis 




Lallie Falls 


Board of Assessors 




Robert Curran, Jr. 


Town Collector/Treasurer 


Joseph W. Galvam 


Loretta Owens 


John Peppe 






Chief of Police Department 


Chief of Fire Department 


William Pace 


Charles D. Foley, Jr. 





School Committee 

Tina Fegan 
Marybeth Nearen 
Ida Gordon 
Emmanuel Mecha 
Keith Wortzman 
Bruce Pontbriand 



Director of Elder Affairs 

Rena A. Baker (retired) 

Director of Community Programs 
(Recreation & Elder Affairs now combined) 

Marc Craig 

Director of Veterans Services/Veterans Agent 

John "Mike" Cunningham 



Finance Director 

Arti Mehta 

Board of Health 

David Kaplan 
Mark Kittredge 
Thomas J. Fisher 
Nelly Browne-Janga 
Esther Muhammad 

Board of Appeals 

Arnold Rosenthal 
Christopher Spears 
Edward Gilbert 
Alexander Costa 
John Pacella 

Board of Appeals, alternates 

Teresa Yan 
Simeon Korisky 
Kevin O'Connell 
Brian Cruise 
Vacancy 



Building Commissioner 

George A. Fabrizio, Sr. 

Trustees, Stetson School Fund 

Henry M. Cooke IV 
Joseph Mulligan, Jr. 
Ira Greene 

Planning Board 

David Espinosa 
Patrick Harrison 
Maureen Dunn 
Alexandra Alexopoulos 
Peter Taveira 

Town Planner 

Michelle Tyler 



Animal Control Officer/ 
Animal Inspector 

Stephen Slavinsky 



Inspector of Wires Inspector of Gas and Plumbing 

Richard Sass Robert E. Curran, Jr. 

Ronald Ferreira, Asst. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Randolph Housing Authority 

Ronald Lum 

Mary Wells 

James M. Hurley 

Francis O'Brien 

State Appointee (vacant) 



Director of Civil Defense 

David C. Murphy, Town Manager 



Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Donald Smith 



Field Driver 

Leo H. Jacobsen 

Conservation Commission 

Pamela Ilobachie 
Bobby Young 
Rudolph Philemon 
Carl Brown 
Francis Gates 
Jean M. Gately 
Rhonda Bevis 



Burial Agent 

John McVeigh 

Priscilla MacDougall, Asst. 

Scott Cartwright, Asst. 

Board of Recreation 

Debra Ouellette 
Jamall Griffin 
Raymond Carson 
Afrika Afeni Mills 
Ronald Jackson 
Pamela Tirrell 
Katrina Huff-Lamond 



Fence Viewers 

Vacancy 

Vacancy 

Historical Commission 

Henry M. Cooke IV 
Alan Banks 
William Thompson 
Mary West 
Tina Walker 
Mark Kittredge 
Lynn Feingold 
Lallie Falls 



Local Cultural Council 

Anne M. Barkhouse 
Linda M. Sproules 
William Pace 
Loretta Owens 
Cheryl Sass 
Marybeth Nearen 
Sheila Swanwick 
Joan Smith 
Kathy Haire 
Vacancy 
Vacancy 



Trustees, Turner Free Library 

Kevin M. Reilly Judith C. Jones 

Anne M. Barkhouse Edmund Prusik 

Richard D. Marden Lisa Berch 

Jay Singh Afrika Afeni-Mills 

Scott Cartwright Dorothy Coveney 

Sheila Campbell Paul J. Connors 

Thomas Donovan Andrew Azer, Council Rep. 

Richard Brewer, Council Rep. David C. Murphy, Town Manager 



Council on Aging 

Dorothy M. Sullivan 
Irene Canavan 
Jane Richardson 
Helen Tolland 
Norma Ranee 
Ruth C. Olsen 
Jack Betterman 
Gerald Good 
Metta Lyons 
Vacancy 
Vacancy 



Cable TV Advisory Committee 

Robert Stone 
Michael Hipsman 
Marc Berman 
Beth Greenspan 
Valaree Crawford 
Phyllis Hewson 
Vacancy 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Disabilities Commission 

Sandra Slavet 
Anthony Buonopane 
Marshall Epstein 
Sharon D. Jones 
Jessica Churchill 
Trevor Hodge 
Vacancy 



Animal Welfare Committee 

Toby Lynne Schwartz 
Madeline Kiniklis 
Paula Camiel 
Patricia Morrissey 
Vacancy 

Stephen Slavinsky, ACO (ex-officio) 



Fair Housing Committee 

Vacancy, Fair Housing Officer 

Olga Lyken 

Claire Messina 

Arnold Rosenthal 

Mary Brown Jones 

Lt. Arthur M. Sullivan, Jr., 

RPD Civil Rights Officer 



Local Education Fund Committee 

Sheila Campbell 
Ellen Griffin 
Alfred Galante 
Catherine Grinnell 
Ann Wickles 
Maureen Campbell 
Judith Brennan 
Vacancy 

Vacancy (Supt. Apptee.) 



Community Preservation Committee 

Brian P. Howard, representing Conservation Commission 
David Espinosa, representing Planning Board 
Mary West, representing Historical Commission 
Vacancy, community member 
Gerald Good, Sr., business member 

Carline Olivier, Sovereign Bank, representing Chamber of Commerce 
Raymond Carson, representing Open Space & Recreation 
Ronald Lum, representing Housing Authority 
Arthur Goldstein, representing Town Council 



5 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
REPORT OF THE TOWN COUNCIL 

During the second term of our still young form of government, the 
Town Council continued to work towards improving upon the three 
major goals: to increase accountability for our elected officials, to 
improve government efficiency, and to make our government more 
transparent. All materials for the Town Council meetings are available 
on-line, including agendas for the upcoming meetings so that our 
residents can be informed and educated about the business being 
discussed. RCTV televises and replays Council and other boards 
meetings so that our residents can hold our leaders accountable for 
their actions. The inherent delays of our former government have been 
eliminated so that agenda items may be deliberated and voted on in a 
much more timely and efficient manner. 

Working together with our Town Manager, David Murphy, our great 
community has seen many changes to our landscape with the 
revitalization of Crawford Square, as well as many other 
improvements along our Main Street and other areas of town. We 
thank Mr. Murphy for his passion, dedication, and vision for the Town 
of Randolph. Powers Farms, the newly opened Randolph Dog Park, 
our new athletic complex, recently passed ordinances, and working 
with our business community, have continued to improve the quality 
of life for our residents. The Town Council and School Committee 
have continued our commitment by working together, sharing 
information and actively participating in our joint meetings. We have 
seen progress in the past year for our school system, but we understand 
that there are many challenges that we must still address as we strive 
for increased student achievement for all our children. 

During 2012, thirty-three orders were submitted to and deliberated by 
the Town Council. Some of the highlights include: 

1 . Complete revision of our general bylaws 

2. Various transfers to our stabilization fund 

3. Approved Zoning changes relative to: 

a. Building Height Requirements 

b. FEMA Zoning Bylaw 

c. Clear Sight Area 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



d. Off-Street Parking 

e. More than one building on a lot 

4. Approved Fiscal Year 2013 Operating and Enterprise Fund 
Budgets 

5. Approved $1 million Capital Improvement Plan 

a. Three new police cruisers 

b. School technology 

c. Fire Department ambulance 

d. Diesel utility pickup with plow 

e. Streets and sidewalks 

f Capital Planning Study 

6. Approved Community Preservation expenditures 

a. Town Planner 

b. Historical Preservation Plan 

c. Congregational Church clock repairs 

d. Restoration of the Belcher House 

In addition, there are still a few 20 1 2 orders that are being worked on 
by our Finance and Ordinance subcommittees including: 

1. Rezoning of properties at 374, 965, 967, and 969 North Main 
Street 

2. Creation of an Affordable Housing Trust Fund 

3. Changes to Zoning Definitions and the Table of Allowable 
Activity 

4. Creation of a Veterans' Committee 

The Town Council continued our annual review of our Rules and 
Regulations to improve our efficiency and effectiveness, as well as 
making the Council more proactive: 

1. Meeting schedule for the calendar year will be established by 
the President by the 2^^ meeting in January. 

2. Established policy that reorganization occurs at the meeting 
in January or the bi-annual Inauguration 

3. Changed that a motion to reconsider may be made as the first 
order of business of the next meeting 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



According to the Town charter, the Council also acts as the licensing 
board. Throughout the year, the Council approved various permits 
such as livery, common victualler's, change of managers, and various 
other licenses. We continued to have various community 
organizations such as the Historical Commission, Boy Scout Troop 
Pack #36, Girl Scout Troop #74478, No Place for Hate, and Hilltop 
Humane Society, as well as many of our department heads, present to 
the Council to help keep our residents informed about the various 
activities and opportunities available in our community. In addition, 
we welcomed Eric Laprade, Music Director, and members of the 
Randolph High School band for a musical demonstration and heard the 
powerful poetry reading of RHS Freshman Stephanie Igharosa, 
Massachusetts Poetry Champion. The Council welcomed new 
firefighters and police officers to our public safety force and 
congratulated those promoted during the calendar year. 

The Council appointed Abby Keane as our new Clerk of the Council, 
replacing Andrea Bohn. We express our sincere appreciation to both 
Abby and Andrea for their tremendous efforts, as well as the staff of 
the Town Manager, Linda Sproules, Anne Barkhouse, and Betty 
McGrath, who continue to provide valuable resources to the Council. 
Also, thank you to Town Clerk and Assistant Town Manager Brian 
Howard and his staff Cheryl Sass and Kristen McDonald, for their 
continued support. Special thanks to Randolph Community 
Television, their staff and volunteers for their commitment to public 
access television and their continued coverage of Town Council and 
other board meetings, as well as the various programs for the Town of 
Randolph. We welcomed Arti Mehta as our new Director of 
Municipal Finance and look forward to working with her to strengthen 
the financial position for our community. Lastly, we congratulated 
Steve Toomey, Town Accountant, on his retirement and his long-time 
commitment and dedication to the Town of Randolph in a variety of 
different positions over the years. 

The Town Council has worked hard over the past year, continuing to 
build upon our recent successes. By collaborating with our Town 
Manager and other departments and boards and reaching out to our 
resident and the business community, we will continue building 
toward tomorrow today. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Respectfully submitted, 

Andrew L. Azer, President 
Paul J. Meoni, Vice-President 
Jason Adams 
William Alexopoulos 
James F. Burgess Jr. 
Richard A. Brewer 
Kenrick Clifton 
Paul K. Femandes 
Arthur Goldstein 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



"Tfie secret of c flange is to focus aCC 
of your energy, not onfigkting the 
oCcf, But on buiCding the new. " 

Socrates 




North Randolph sidewalk improvements 
10 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF THE TOWN MANAGER 

Randolph continued to make steady progress toward its goal of 
becoming one of the best communities in the Commonwealth in 2012. 
Our schools continue to improve, our crime rate has decreased by 
close to 24% in recent years, and we have added a number of great 
amenities to improve the quality of life in town. 

This year saw the opening of the Powers Farm Community 
Park. This majestic property off North Main Street will allow 
residents to put the bustle and jar of everyday life far away while they 
enjoy this suburban oasis. On Memorial Day weekend we celebrated 
the grand opening of the picnic pavilion, walking trails, and children's 
playground. The event was well-attended and enthusiasm was abound. 
The site hosted numerous subsequent events including family picnics, 
church outings, and the Town's first Harvest Hoopla celebration in 
October. The Community Preservation Committee funded the 
purchase of the land and the improvements to the property. We hope 
to continue major improvements at Powers Farm over the course of the 
next two years. 

The Town's Dog Park opened this August to tremendous 
appreciation. The Randolph Dog Park Committee and Councilor Rich 
Brewer helped bring about this wonderful addition to our park 
inventory. Located between Grove Street and West Street, the park 
provides canines and their human friends a chance to enjoy the 
freedom of an off-leash park. The dog park is another amenity that 
improves the quality of life in Randolph and the marketability of our 
town. 

Crawford Square received a long-awaited make-over this year 
with the help of more than $2.3 million from the Commonwealth via 
the Public Works and Economic Development grant program. New 
cement sidewalks, brickwork, granite planters, street-paving, 
ornamental crosswalks, and historic-period street lights were installed 
to help attract private investment. Additionally, the utility lines were 



12 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



placed underground and new decorative banners were added, helping 
the overall aesthetics of the business area. 

Work commenced on a similar makeover of the North 
Randolph Business District. New sidewalks, granite planters, historic- 
period street lights were installed. A new traffic design at Old Street 
helped improve flow and pedestrian safety. Final work will be 
completed in 2013. This work will also be completed with help from 
the Commonwealth. 

The Town recognized long-time Veterans and Elderly Service 
Director James M. Hurley by dedicating the senior center on Fencourt 
Avenue in his memory. A beautiful ceremony was held on a bright 
June day recognizing Mr. Hurley's commitment and contribution to 
the veterans and people of Randolph. The ceremony was highlighted 
by a touching tribute from his son, Randolph Fire Captain James 
Hurley. 

Also in June, the Town recognized one of its greatest heroes. 
Congressional Medal of Honor winner George Mason Lovering. Led 
by volunteer and fellow veteran William O'Connell, a new granite 
monument and plaque were dedicated to commemorate Lovering' s 
heroic contribution with the Randolph Light Infantry during the Siege 
of Port Hudson on June 14, 1863. 

The Town experienced yet another drop in the crime rate. 
Through the hard work of the Randolph Police Department, the overall 
crime rate dropped another 5.5% and is down close to 24% in the past 
five years. Under the direction of Chief William Pace, the department 
has launched a number of initiatives and has established a strong link 
to the community. 

The Town also completed a comprehensive study of its fire 
department. The study identified additional staffing, station repairs, 
and improved administrative capabilities as key areas for 



13 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



improvement. Four new firefighters were added in June to begin to 
improve staffing and manning levels. 

Randolph received its first payment for the new billboards 
along Rt. 24 by the landfill. Creative negotiations allowed the Town 
to capture $600,000 in new revenue in 2012 and fill many budget gaps 
created by the down economy. The billboards will serve as a future 
revenue source for the town. 

The Town started what is hoped to be an annual tradition with 
a Volunteer Fair on Martin Luther King Day to honor Dr. King's spirit 
of contribution to society. The Town invited various local and area 
charities to participate and the large turnout helped connect residents 
with great causes in need of help. 

The Town's progress in many areas was recognized by "Today 
in America", a national cable television show featuring a variety of 
interesting topics in government and business. Segments were filmed 
in late-October and will be aired nationally in early-2013. 

The Town welcomed new key personnel in 2012. Randolph 
resident Michelle Tyler was hired to become the Town Planner. Arti 
Mehta was hired to become the town's first Finance Director. 
Recreation Director Marc Craig changed his job title to become 
Director of Community Programming and was also given oversight of 
the Elder Services Department. The Town created its first Code 
Enforcement Officer positions and hired Cheryl Witherspoon and 
Richard Crowley. 

The Town also said goodbye to two great employees who 
retired in 2012. Town Accountant Steve Toomey retired from public 
service after a distinguished career as Town Accountant and 
Selectman. Rena Baker retired from her position as the Director of 
Elder Services. We wish both a healthy and happy retirement. 



14 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



We are quite fortunate to have a great team of department 
heads and employees in Randolph. The success we have enjoyed is 
due directly to the harmonious cooperation of all employees and 
elected leaders. I want to specifically thank the people that support my 
efforts on a daily basis; Linda Sproules, Anne Barkhouse, and super 
volunteer Elizabeth (Betty) McGrath. 

David C. Murphy, 
Town Manager 




One of the many efforts to beautify the town 




Newly planted island looking east 
15 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




One of the newly resurfaced basketball courts 




This flag of flowers planted by members of the Randolph Garden Club adorns the 
slope at the comer of Union and Mill Streets 



16 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




The area where Warren Street meets Condlin Drive is part of the town's Adopt an 

Island program 



17 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE IN-HOUSE TOWN COUNSEL 

This year was a very active and successful year for the Town's 
In-House Counsel: 

(I) Administrative Agency Proceedings . I was involved in 
certain administrative agency proceedings on behalf of the 
Town, including, employee matters before the 
Massachusetts Civil Service Commission. 

(II) Advice & Legal Documents . I provided legal advice, 
legal support and legal opinions to the respective members 
of the Town Council, the Town Manager, and to other 
Town Officials, Department Heads and Boards relating to a 
wide variety of issues and subjects; I drafted numerous 
legal documents including certain Ordinances, Stetson Hall 
tenant leases, sale of real property, employment contracts, 
and those legal documents necessary for presentation 
before the Town Council. 

(III) Court Appearances . I represented the Town in Quincy & 
Stoughton District Courts and prepared certain Affidavits 
and Court filings on various Town-related matters. 

(IV) Labor Issues . I provided advice regarding the 
interpretation and application of collective bargaining 
agreements and the processing of union grievances. In 
addition I also provided assistance regarding certain 
personnel issues, non-union contracts, civil service and 
arbitration issues. I have also worked in conjunctions with 
the Town's outside-Counsel on various legal matters. 

(V) Projects . I assisted with various Town projects and issues, 
including but not limited to, business and real estate 
matters, preservation restriction agreement, non-accessory 
billboard signs, wireless cell towers, alcohol licensing, the 
streetscape project, updating the Town's zoning bylaws and 
the underground utilities project; Assisted on certain 
Building Department, Zoning Board, Board of Health, 



18 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Historical Commission, Community Preservation 
Commission, Department of Public Works, outside- 
Counsel, tax-title Counsel, and Planning Board matters; 
Provided assistance and legal advice relative to the Town 
By-laws, Liquor License matters. Town property matters, 
Avalon Communities LIP agreement, Deposition 
attendances, the State's Open Meeting Law; Provided legal 
seminars to Planning Board and Zoning Board of Appeals 
members; Worked on a regular basis with the Clerk of the 
Council. 

(VI) Real Property . I represented the Town in the sale of 
certain real property located at 975 North Main Street 
(a/k/a Hollywell Nursing Home); reviewed certain deeds, 
easements, leases, and legal agreements at the Norfolk 
County Registry of Deeds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROBERT F. SULLIVAN 
In-House Town Counsel 



19 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Order 2012-001 

Amend Section 200-16.1 Section F(4) Building Height Requirements 

to Amend Section 200-16.1 Section F(4) Building Height Requirements of 

the Randolph Zoning By-laws 

So that it shall read: 

Building Height Requirements: 

Buildings in the Great Pond Commerce Center Overlay District which are 
located on lots not directly abutting any portion of a residentially zoned 
premises within the Town of Randolph may contain a maximum of six (6) 
stories and shall not exceed seventy eight (78) feet in height. Buildings 
which are located on lots which directly abut any portion of a residentially 
zoned premises within the Town of Randolph may contain two (2) stories 
and shall not exceed twenty five (25) feet in height. All height 
measurements shall be made in the fashion set forth in the State Building 
Code 780CMR. 

Council Order: 2012-002 

Transfer of $85,000 from Town Health Insurance to Veterans' Benefits 

The Randolph Town Council hereby authorizes a transfer in the amount of 
eighty-five thousand ($85,000) dollars from the Town's Health Insurance 
budget line account to the Veterans' Benefits budget line. 

Council Order 2012-003 

Acceptance of $600,000 gift from iOn Massachusetts Outdoor LLC 

The Randolph Town Council hereby formally accepts an amount of $600,000 
from iOn Outdoor Advertising (iOn) as a substantial public benefit in 
accordance with the memorandum of agreement and special permit 
agreement between the Town of Randolph and iOn Massachusetts Outdoor 
LLC. 

Council Order 2012-004 

Transfer of $600,000 from substantial public benefit gift account to 
Stabilization Account 

The Randolph Town Council hereby transfers the sum of $600,000 from the 
substantial public benefit provided by iOn Outdoor Massachusetts, LLC and 
accepted by the Randolph Town Council, to the Town's Stabilization 
Account. 

Council Order: 2012-005 

Fiscal Year 2013 Capital Improvement Plan Authorization 

Be it Ordered that the Randolph Town Council approves the request of the 
Town Manager to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or 



20 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of one-million ($1,000,000) 
dollars for the following purposes: 

For remodeling, reconstruction or making extraordinary repairs to town- 
owned buildings and equipment; for the purchase and installation of 
departmental equipment. To include: 



Three new police cruisers $ 1 1 0,000 

School technology $ 1 00,000 

Fire Department Ambulance $250,000 

Diesel utility pickup with plow $50,000 

Streets and sidewalks $440,000 

Capital Planning Study $50,000 



For new public safety building, relocation of fire headquarters, and 
community learning center/senior center/youth center/library expansion at 
current fire headquarters location. 

Councilor Order: 2012-006B 

Fiscal Year 2013 Operating Budget Appropriation - AMENDED 

The Randolph Town Council hereby authorizes that the Town of Randolph 
will raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or borrow pursuant 
to any applicable statute to fund the operations of the various boards, offices, 
departments, commissions and agencies of the Town of Randolph for Fiscal 
Year 2013 in the amount of $76,192,779. 

The Council hereby authorizes the following amounts for the 
specified purposes: 



Department 


Salary 


Expense 


Total 


Accountant 


$145,537 


$3,285 


$148,822 


Animal Control 


$54,038 


$21,478 


$75,516 


Animal Inspector 


$5,000 


$9,000 


$14,000 


Assessor's Office 


$146,928 


$61,700 


$208,628 


Board and Committees 


$15,000 


$11,930 


$26,930 


Clerk and Registrar 


$222,739 


$60,587 


$283,326 


Debt & Interest 




$2,387,519 


$2,387,519 


Department of 


$812,694 


$471,850 


$1,284,544 


Public Works (corrected) 








Elder Services 


$109,586 


$15,000 


$124,586 


Fire Department 


$4,334,835 


$399,770 


$4,734,605 


Health Department 


$190,722 


$2,140,269 


$2,330,991 


Inspectional Services 


$196,701 


$3,000 


$199,701 


Library 


$595,436 


$177,945 


$773,381 


Planning Department 


$25,000$5,000 




$30,000 


Police Department 


$5,160,660 


$321,091 


$5,481,751 



21 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Retirement 
Town Council 
Town Legal 
Town Manager 
Health Insurance 
Treasurer/Collector 
Veterans Agent 
Collective Bargaining 
2% Non-Union Raise 
Finance Director 
School Department 

Blue Hills Regional 
Workers Comp Trust Fund 
Overlay Reserve 
Collector's Overlay 





$3,425,000 


$3,425,000 


$32,000 


$8,000 


$40,000 


$91,870 


$198,130 


$290,000 


$259,425 


$1,696,204 


$1,955,629 




$9,670,000 


$9,670,000 


$300,139 


$100,350 


$400,489 


$44,530 


$303,770 


$348,300 


$561 670 




$561 670 


$25,000 




$25,000 


$90,000 




$90,000 






$36,650,000 






$3,897,390 




S400 000 


S400 000 




$350,000 


$350,000 




$7,000 


$7,000 


TOTAL 


$76,192,779 



22 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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23 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TOWN MANAGER 




































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Total Expenses 




Total Salary 


iTotal Expenses 


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1 Total Budget 



24 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



































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26 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Council Order: 2012-011 

More Than One Building on a Single Lot 

The Town Council moves to amend Section 200-1 1 of the Zoning Bylaws 

So that the final version reads as follows: 

§ 200-11. Business districts, business professional districts, Crawford 
Square Business District, North Randolph Business District, West 
Comers Business District, Blue Hill River Highway District and Great 
Bear Swamp Highway District. 

No building or structure shall be erected which is designed or intended to 
be used for residential use or for manufacturing, mechanical or other 
industrial use in a Business District or Business Professional District or 
zone, except as hereinafter provided. 

A. Permitted uses in business districts. The following uses are 
permitted in a Business District: 

(1) Any use permitted in a Residential District or zone, but not to 
include multifamily dwellings, two-family units and single- 
family units. 

(2) Retail or wholesale stores and any and all establishments 
wherein goods or services or either of them are sold, rented or 
offered directly to the consumer, customer or other patron, 
including, among others, garages, tailor shops, plumbing and 
heating establishments, professional offices, restaurants and the 
like, providing they comply with the Table of Allowable 
Activity. 

(3) See Table of Allowable Activity for uses subject to a special 
permit. 

B. Permitted uses in business professional districts. The following 
uses are permitted in a Business Professional District: 

(1) Any use permitted in a Business District or zone, but not to 
include the following: hospitals, hotels, motels, nursing homes, 
retail or wholesale stores, greenhouses, nurseries, theaters, 
private schools, barbershops, beauty salons, public utilities, 
stables and kennels, providing they comply with the Table of 
Allowable Activity. 

(2) Office or professional uses in which services are offered or 
rendered to the public by professionals not resident therein, 
including, among others, professional offices for medical 
doctors, dentists, engineers, architects, lawyers, accountants, 
landscape architects, chiropractors, podiatrists, optometrists, 
psychologists, insurance or investment counselors, real estate 
offices and social workers, providing they comply with the Table 
of Allowable Activity. 



27 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



(3) See Table of Allowable Activity for uses subject to a special 
permit. 

C. The Crawford Square Business District (CSBD) is intended to 
recognize and enhance the role of North Main Street and the 
Crawford Square area as the Town's principle focus for civic, 
cultural and social functions. Complementary office and related uses 
forms the center for commercial, financial, professional, and 
governmental activities to provide all basic services and amenities 
required to keep the downtown the vital center of our community. 
The Crawford Square Business District (CSBD) not only 
accommodates but encourages a higher density of small-scale 
establishments offering a wide variety of goods and services. It also 
provides for family dwellings living in upper floors of business 
buildings. Intensive development oriented to pedestrians is 
anticipated, and while mixed-use-developments is appropriate in 
certain areas, any uses which interrupt pedestrian circulation and 
shopping patterns are discouraged. No building or structure shall be 
erected that is designed or intended to be used for residential use or 
for manufacturing or other mechanical use in the Crawford Square 
Business District or zone except as herein provided. 

(1) Permitted uses in the Crawford Square Business District 
(CSBD). The following uses are permitted in the CSBD. 

(a) Dwelling unit. Single-family dwellings. 

(b) Mixed use development multiple units. The combination 
of residential and business uses on a single lot shall be 
permitted within the Crawford Square Business District in 
order to promote the general welfare of the community by 
assuring the economic vitality of its downtown business area 
while minimizing potential adverse impacts upon nearby 
neighborhoods and other premises. This purpose is to be 
achieved through the establishment of controls specifically 
for mixed business and residential uses at locations where 
either such uses already exist or they would be appropriate 
because of access and other geographical considerations. 
[Added 5-25-2005 ATM, Art. 5, approved 10-18-2005] 

[1] Mixed use development multifamily units: Any dwelling 
unit located within a multifamily mixed use development 
within the Crawford square Business District must meet 
minimum requirements, such unit shall have (I) not less than 
625 square feet of usable living area, (II) not more than two 
bedrooms, (III) at least one full bath, and (IIII) shall have its 
own laundry hook-ups, there shall be no shared laundry 
facilities on premise. 



28 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



(c) Retail stores. Retail stores and establishments wherein 
goods and services or either of them, are sold or offered 
directly to consumers as provided in the Table of Allowable 
Activity. 

(d) Office or professional uses. Office or professional 
services in which services are offered or rendered to the 
public by professionals not resident therein, including, 
among others, professional offices for medical doctors, 
dentists, engineers, architects, lawyers, accountants, 
landscape architects, chiropractors, podiatrists, optometrists, 
psychologists, insurance, or investment counselors, real 
estate offices, or social workers and others, providing they 
comply with the Table of Allowable Activity. 

(e) See Table of Allowable Activity for uses subject to a 
special permit. 

(f) Unless allowed as of right pursuant to Section 200-80 
wireless communication facilities are subject to a special 
permit issued by Town Council. See section 200-57. 

(g) Not withstanding the provisions of section 200-3, the 
Town Council, as the special permit granting authority, may 
allow the construction of more than one building on a single 
lot located within the Crawford Square business District, so 
long as each building is otherwise in compliance with the 
requirements of this section 200-1 1 . 

(h) Accessory dwelling units. [Amended 5-22-2006 ATM, 
Art. 42, approved 10-17-2006] 

(2) Proscribed uses in the Crawford Square Business District 
(CSBD). In order to facilitate and develop the intent of the 
Towns Master Plan, to be consistent with Smart Growth 
principles, and to develop a cohesive and diverse commercial 
and cultural center that provides for pedestrian-friendly and civic 
life the following uses are proscribed. See Table of Allowable 
Activity. 

(3) The CSBD shall be governed by the Table of Allowable 
Activity, as adopted and as may be amended. Which is hereby 
specifically incorporated by reference herein. 

D. The North Randolph Business District and West Comers Business 
District are intended to provide areas of low commercial 
development density. They provide locations within the Town for 
small, convenient office and personal service areas. Commercial 
development in these districts shall cater to the residents of Randolph 
and nearby areas, remain small enough in scale to be well integrated 
into a neighborhood setting, and possess appropriate traffic safety 



29 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



components which will limit potential negative impacts resulting 
from a nonresidential use. 

E. The Blue Hill River Highway District and Great Bear Swamp 
Highway District is intended to provide general retail sales, services, 
and business space within the Town of Randolph in locations 
capable of conveniently servicing community wide and/or regional 
trade areas, and oriented primarily to automobile access. Businesses 
are positioned on streets which abut, front on, or have access to a 
major highway. 

(1) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 200-3, the Town 
Council, as the special permit granting authority, may allow the 
construction of more than one building on a single lot located 
within the Great Bear Swamp Highway District, so long as each 
building is otherwise in compliance with the requirements of 
section 200-11 

F. If any provisions of these sections shall be held to be invalid by a 
court of competent jurisdiction then such provisions shall be 
considered separately and apart from the remaining provisions, 
which shall remain in full force and effect 



30 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



2012-012 

FY' 13 CPC Report 



Town of Randolph 
Report to the Town Council 
FY 2013 Randolph Community Preservation Committee 
May 21,2012 




31 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Town of Randolph 
FY 2013 CPC Report to the Town Council 

Table of Contents 

CPA Report 

I. Overview of CPA 

II. Summary of CPA in Randolph 

III. Activities of Community Preservation Committee 

IV. Applications Received 



A. Historical Preservation Plan- $25,000 

B. Congregational Church Clock Repairs- $16,500 

C. Community Preservation Town Planner- $50,000 

D. Restoration of the Belcher House- $202,268 

E. Land Purchases Bond Payment- $141,000 



V. Financial Overview 

VI. Forward Looking Statement 



32 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

I. Overview of CPA 

The Community Preservation Act (hereafter referred to as "CPA"), M.G.L. c. 
44B, allows Massachusetts cities and towns to raise monies through a 
surcharge of up to 3% of the real estate tax levy on real property. In 
November 2004, Town Meeting voted a 2% annual real estate levy against 
real property. This was ratified at the Annual Town Election held on April 5, 
2005. Town Meeting did accept two exemptions from this surcharge as 
permitted by law: an exemption of $100,000 of the value of each taxable 
parcel of residential real property and an exemption for low income. 
Exemptions for low income applications are available in the Assessors 
Office. 

These CPA funds are to be used for four core purposes: to acquire, create and 
preserve open space; to acquire, rehabilitate, restore and preserve historic 
resources; to create, preserve and support community housing; and to 
acquire, preserve and utilize land for recreational use. The Act also provides 
significant State matching funds. 

A minimum of 1 0% of the annual revenues of the fund must be appropriated 
for each of the three core community concerns. The remaining 70% can be 
allocated for any combination of the allowed uses, or for land for recreational 
use. 

Property taxes traditionally fund the day-to-day operating needs of safety, 
health, schools, roads, maintenance, and more. Until the CPA, there was no 
steady funding source for preserving and improving a community's 
infrastructure. The Community Preservation Act gives a community the 
funds needed to control its future. 

II. Summary of CPA in Randolph 

Randolph's fiscal year 2013 CPA revenue of approximately $600,000 is 
expected to be matched by the State in October 2012 at 20% 

Consistent with the terms of the CPA and with the Community Preservation 
Committee (hereafter referred to as "CPC") bylaw adopted at the November 
2004 Town Meeting, the Randolph Community Preservation Committee was 
appointed in July 2005 to administer the CPA. 



33 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Randolph Community Preservation Committee 
(as of May 15, 2012) 



Conservation Commission appointee Brian Howard, Chairman 

At-large community member (Vacancy) 

Town Council member William Alexopoulos 

Housing Authority member Ron Lum 

Business community member Gerald Good 

Chamber of Commerce member Carline Olivier-Guerrier 

Planning Board member David Espinosa 

Historical Commission member Mary West 



Open Space and Recreation 
Committee member.. 



Raymond Carson 



III. Activities of the Community Preservation Committee and Town 
Council 



The Community Preservation Committee has met several times to discuss 
Randolph's CPA plan, accept proposals, study the proposals, seek additional 
information, deliberate, and make the recommendations included in this 
document. Furthermore, for several of the projects, the CPC solicited 
additional information, such as outside reports and evaluations of the 
proposed projects. 

The CPA Statute and the DOR Guidelines dictate that Town Council may 
only appropriate funds for a project pursuant to a recommendation of the 
CPC. The Statute and DOR Guidelines make clear that Town Council 
cannot approve an appropriation for a project on its own initiative. 
Consequently, the Statute and Guidelines dictate that Town Council cannot 
alter the scope of a project recommended by the CPC, as doing so would 
result in approval of a project that is different from that recommended by the 
Committee. 



34 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



IV. Applications Received by the Committee 

Table 1 Applications Received 
Applicant Name Project Type 



Historical Commission 
Congregational Church 
CPC/Town Manager 



Randolph's Women's 
Club 



Historical Preservation Plan 

Clock Repairs 

Community Preservation 
Town Planner 

Restoration of the Belcher 
House 



Project Cost Purpose 



$25,000 
$16,500 

$50,000 

$202,268 



Historic Preservation 
Historic Preservation 

Development 

Historic Preservation 



Table 2 2013 CPA Expenditures Approved by Category/Type 



Historic 

Historical Preservation Plan 
Congregational Church Clock Repairs 

General Reserve 

Community Preservation Town Planner 
Belcher House Restoration 
Land Purchases Bond Payment 

Administrative 

FY2013 Administrative Costs 

A. Historical Preservation Plan 



$25,000 
$16,500 



$50,000 

$202,268 

$141,000 



$10,000 



($25,000- Historic) 



The Historical Commission does not have a current comprehensive plan for 
Historic Preservation. This funding would develop a preservation plan that 
could be incorporated into the Town's Master Plan for future reference. An 
Historic Homes survey was conducted in 2008-2009, that identified historic 
buildings in Town. The completion of an Historic Preservation plan will 
provide multiple benefits to our community. It will complete the cataloging 
of Randolph's historic properties, serve as a guide to prioritizing resources 
for ongoing historic preservation, facilitate application for funding through 
state and federal grant programs and provide a framework for potential bylaw 
amendments to adequately protect the Town's historic resources. This project 
will receive matching funds from a Massachusetts Historical Commission 
grant. 



35 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
Committee's Comments: 

Whereas one of the Community Preservation Act's core purposes is to 
preserve history and the Commission lacks a comprehensive historic 
preservation plan and the project is receiving matching funding from 
Massachusetts Historical Commission, the CPC feels this is a great use 
of CPA funding and a worthwhile project that will benefit the Town 
moving forward. It is important that we preserve our histor\ . 

B. Congregational Church Clock Repairs ($16,500- Historic) 

The Congregational Church is one of the oldest churches in Randolph, the 
clock tower has been telling time since the early 1800s. The low^er part of 
the tower depicts how^ the sea was an important part of New England life. 
The clock is now in dire need of repair. The restoration would include: 
preparation, removal, transportation and refurbishing the three clock dials; 
priming of the metal numerals, minute markers and bands; and the 
preparation, priming, and painting of the clock hands. The work on the clock 
is expected to be completed by spring of 2013 (depending on the availability 
of the contractor). 

Committee's Comments: 

Whereas part of the Communit\^ Preservation Act's core purposes is to 
preserve history and this clock tower is one of the oldest in Town, and 
the tower is located in historic Crawford Square which the Town is 
investing in preserving and the Church is also funding a significant part 
of the renovation of the steeple and clock, the CPC feels this is a proper 
use of CPA funding and the project will keep with the Town's plan for 
the downtown area. Other than our own Stetson Hall, the 
Congregational Church is the most recognizable historic structure in 
Crawford Square. 

C Community Preservation Town Planner ($50,000 - General) 

The CPC Planner is responsible for assisting with the implementation and 
leveraging of the Town's Community Preservation program while working in 
collaboration with the CPC, Planning Board, ZBA, Housing Authority and 
Town Council. The position is responsible for preparing funding 
recommendations from the Community Preservation Committee to Town 
Council; working with grant recipients to monitor the implementation of 
CPA-funded projects; assisting the CPC with media activities and 
community outreach; assisting with the preparation of the CPC's Annual 
Report and annual update of the Community Preservation Plan; and other 
general tasks to assist the CPC with implementation of the CPA Program. 



36 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
Essential Elements 

Works with the Community Preservation Committee in its capacity to review 
and approve CPC recommendations, including writing CPC recommendation 
memos, docketing items, providing support materials, and Town Council 
meetings as they pertain to CPC recommendations. 

To help the CPC in its endeavor to acquire and preserve open space, 
community housing, and historic preservation. Furthermore, to assist in 
smart growth housing initiatives that will lead to meeting the Town's 40B 
requirements. 

Works with the Town Counsel to ensure timely execution of funding 
agreements and other legal documents pertaining to CPA funded projects 
such as open space, historic preserv^ation, and housing deed restrictions. 

Committee's Comments: 

Whereas the CPC made an initial commitment to fund the position of 
the Community Preservation / Town Planner for over three years, we 
feel that this position is both critical to this committee and the Town. 
This year the committee is funding part of this position and the Town 
will supplement the remainder of the salary. The position has been a 
tremendous success and has been invaluable to the Town Manager, the 
Town Council, the Planning Board and the Community Preservation 
Committee. This position will continue to have an impact on the future 
development of our Town. 

D. Restoration of the Belcher House ($202,268 - General) 

The Belcher House is on the National Historic Register and has been 
maintained for the past 100 years by the Randolph Women's Club. The 
house is now in desperate need of repairs to avoid irreparable loss to the 
building's historic materials, characteristic details and original architectural 
details. The work done will include repairs and preservation treatments to 
prolong the life of the wood, siding, trim, windows, doors, roofs and 
foundation of the exterior restoration of the main house, North and South 
wings, the woodshed and carriage house. 

Committee's Comments: 

Whereas part of the Community Preservation Act's core purposes is to 
preserve history and the Belcher House is in desperate need of exterior 
repairs, and these repairs will help keep the property on the National 
Historic Register, the CPC feels this is a proper use of CPA funding. 
The Belcher House is an important part of the rich history of our 



37 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

community. We are in full support of this project to protect this 
wonderful house for another generation. 

E. Powers Farm, Rent and Daly Property 

Land Purchase - Bond Payment ($141,000 - General Account) 

To complete the second payment on the borrowing approved at Town 
Meeting to purchase Powers Farm ($800,000), the Rent Property ($425,000) 
and the Daly Property ($175,000). This will be the second of ten payments to 
payoff the bond. In addition, this includes the first payment on the interest 
(BAN) for the construction of Powers Farm voted two years ago for 
$296,000. 

Committee's Comments: 

Whereas the Committee has made a commitment to pay the land 
purchase bond in a ten year period, instead of choosing a twenty year 
bond, the CPC will save approximately $225,000 in interest charges. 
The second year payment will be $141,000. In addition, the total amount 
of the borrowing is $500,000 less the total appropriated amount per the 
state grant awarded for the purchase of Powers Farm. This figure 
includes the interest payment on the (BAN) for construction costs until it 
is bonded later this summer. 

V. Randolph CPC Financial Overview 

See attached FY2013 recommendation spreadsheet. 

VI. Acknowledgements 

The Community Preservation Committee appreciates the extremely hard 
work this year's applicants devoted to their applications, answering CPC 
members' questions, and the support the Committee has received from every 
department in Town; specifically, the Treasurer/Collector's Office, Town 
Accountant, Assessor's Office, Town Clerk/Registrar's Office, Town 
Planner, Town Manager and Town Counsel. 

VIL Forward looking statement 

The Community Preservation Committee encourages any interested party to 
contact the Committee to inquire as to whether or not a particular project is 
eligible for CPA funding. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Historically, the CPC has received minimal funding requests for affordable 
housing. To that end, Committee spokespersons have initiated meetings with 
the Massachusetts Affordable Housing Alliance, Habitat for Humanity and 
connected with other CPA communities to evaluate options that could be 
initiated in Randolph. The Committee expects to propose projects for 
funding in the next cycle. 

Long-range funding is being evaluated for eventual purchase of additional 
open space parcels and the Committee's forms and applications are being 
redeveloped, rules and regulations updated and a public presence via the 
Town website established. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Council Order: 2012-013 

Fiscal Year 2013 - Revolving Accounts Authorization 

The Randolph Town Council hereby votes to establish or reestablish the 
following departmental revolving accounts pursuant to MGL Ch. 44 s. 53 EYi 
for Fiscal Year 2013: 



Account 


Authority 


Source 


Limit 


Senior Transport 


Director, COA 


fees and donations 


$10,000 


Recycling 


Director, BOH 


sale of bins, stickers. 








fees and grants 


$50,000 


Immunizations 


Director, BOH 


fees/revenue 








for immunization 


$10,000 


Appeals 


ZBA 


filing fees 


$10,000 


Special permits 


Town Council 


reimbursement for 








mailings and ads 


$10,000 


Stetson Hall 


Stetson Trustees 


rentals of hall 








and offices 


$100,000 


Recreation Department 


Recreation Director 


fees, rentals. 








registrations 


$850,000 



Council Order: 2012-014 
Enterprise Fund Debt Authorization 

The Randolph Town Council authorizes an additional debt payment from the 
FY 12 Water Enterprise Account in the amount of $318,000. Said payment 
to be paid out of the Water Enterprise Fund retained earnings. 

Council Order: 2012-015 

Enterprise Fund Capital Expenditure Requests 

Be it Ordered that the Randolph Town Council approves the request of the 
Town Manager to raise and appropriate, transfer from available funds, or 
borrow pursuant to any applicable statute a sum of dollars for the following 
purposes: 

For remodeling, reconstruction or making extraordinary repairs to water 
treatment facilities and equipment; for the purchase and installation of 
departmental equipment. To include: 



Water Treatment Plant Equipment $400,000 

Carbon filter media replacement - replacement of tube settlers 
Mini-excavator with attachments $ 1 05 ,000 

Portable push camera for sewer inspection unit $ 12,000 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Council Order: 2012-016 

Transfer of $900,000 from Sale of Surplus Property to Stabilization 
Fund 

The Randolph Town Council hereby authorizes a transfer in the amount of 
nine-hundred thousand ($900,000) dollars from the Sale of Surplus Property 
account to the Town of Randolph Stabilization Fund. 

Order 2012-017 

FEMA Floodplain Management 

The Town Council moves to amend section 200-16 of the Zoning By-laws as 
follows, where the existing Sections E and F of 200-16 were eliminated and 
replaced with the following: 
E Special flood hazard areas. 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has issued revised Flood 
Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) and Flood Insurance Study Booklet (FIS) for 
the Town of Randolph, which identifies the special flood hazard areas within 
the Town. The revision date of the FIRM Maps and FIS Booklet is July 17, 
2012 All proposed new construction, substantial additions/improvements and 
utilities within the one -hundred year flood plain must comply with the 
revised FIRM Maps, FIS Booklet, and the provisions in section 200-16 
subsection F of the Randolph Zoning Bylaw. 
F Special flood hazard areas. 

Areas are as created by the National Flood Insurance \Program (NFIP) and 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on their most current 
maps adopted by the Town of Randolph (see 200-1 6.E) In conjunction with 
the State Flood Hazard Management Program of the Department of 
Environment's Management Office of Water Resources, the State Building 
Code, Wetlands Overlay Protection Act, State Sanitary Code and the Town 
of Randolph Watershed and Wetlands Protection Overlay District Zoning 
Code, and any other applicable Zoning Codes and/or Bylaws. [Added 4-24- 
2001 ATM, Art. 21, approved 12-21-2001] 
1 Statement of floodplain area purposes: 

(a) Ensure public safety through reducing the threats to life and 
personal injury. 

(b) Eliminate new hazards to emergency response officials. 

(c) Prevent the occurrence of public emergencies resulting from 
water quality contamination, and, pollution due to flooding. 

(d) Avoid the loss of utility services which if damaged by flooding 
would disrupt or shutdown the utility network and impact regions of 
the community beyond the site of flooding. 

(e) Eliminate costs associated with the response and cleanup of 
flooding conditions. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



(f) Reduce damage to public and private property resulting from 
flooding waters. 
2 Definitions. 

(a) AREA OF SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD is the land in the 
floodplain within a community subject to a one percent or greater 
chance of flooding in any given year. The area may be designated as 
Zone A, AO, AH, Al-30, AE, A99, Vl-30, VE, or V. 

(b) BASE FLOOD means the flood having a one percent chance of 
being equaled or exceeded in any given year. 

(c) DEVELOPMENT means any manmade change to improved or 
unimproved real estate, including but not limited to building or other 
structures, mining, dredging, filling, grading, paving, excavation or 
drilling operations. 

(d) DISTRICT means floodplain district. 

(e) FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY 
(FEMA) administers the National Flood Insurance Program. FEMA 
provides a nationwide flood hazard area mapping study program for 
communities as well as regulatory standards for development in the 
flood hazard areas. 

(f) FLOOD BOUNDARY AND FLOOD WAY MAP means an 
official map of a community issued by FEMA that depicts, based on 
detailed analyses, the boundaries of the 100-year and 500 year floods 
and the 100-year floodway. (For maps done in 1987 and later, the 
floodway designation is included on the FIRM.) 

(g) FLOOD HAZARD BOUNDARY MAP (FHBM) means an 
official map of a community issued by FEMA where the boundaries 
of the flood and related erosion areas having special hazards have 
been designated as Zone A or E. 

(h) FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP (FIRM) means an official 
map of a community on which FEMA has delineated both the areas 
of special flood hazard and the risk premium zones applicable to the 
community. 

(i) FLOOD INSURANCE STUDY means an examination, 
evaluation, and detemiination of flood hazards, and, if appropriate, 
corresponding water surface elevations, or an examination, 
evaluation and determination of flood-related erosion hazards. 

(j ) FLOODWAY means the channel of a river or other watercourse 
and the adjacent land areas that must be reserved in order to 
discharge the base flood without cumulatively increasing the water 
surface elevation. 

(k) LOWEST FLOOR means the lowest floor of the lowest enclosed 
area (including basement or cellar). An unfinished or flood resistant 
enclosure, usable solely for parking of vehicles, building access or 



42 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



storage in an area other than a basement area is not considered a 
building's lowest floor, PROVIDED that such enclosure is not built 
so as to render the structure in violation of the applicable non- 
elevation design requirements of NFIP Regulations 60.3. 
(1) MANUFACTURED HOME means a structure, transportable in 
one or more sections, which is built on a permanent chassis and is 
designed for use with or without a permanent foundation when 
connected to the required utilities. For floodplain management 
purposes the term "manufactured home" also includes park trailers, 
travel trailers, and other similar vehicles placed on a site for greater 
than 180 consecutive days. For insurance purposes, the term 
"manufactured home" does not include park trailers, travel trailers, 
and other similar vehicles. 

(m)NEW CONSTRUCTION means, for floodplain management 
purposes, structures for which the "start of construction" commenced 
on or after the effective date of a floodplain management regulation 
adopted by a community. For the purpose of determining insurance 
rates, NEW CONSTRUCTION means structures for which the "start 
of construction" commenced on or after the effective date of an 
initial FIRM or after December 31, 1974, whichever is later, 
(n) ONE-HUNDRED-YEAR FLOOD - see BASE FLOOD, 
(o) REGULATORY FLOODWAY - see FLOODWAY 
(p) SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREA means an area having 
special flood and/or flood-related erosion hazards, and shown on an 
FHBM or FIRM as Zone A, AO, A 1-30, AE, A99, AH, V, VI 30, 
VE. 

(q) STRUCTURE means, for floodplain management purposes, a 
walled and roofed building, including a gas or liquid storage tank, 
that is principally above ground, as well as a manufactured home. 
STRUCTURE, for insurance coverage purposes, means a walled and 
roofed building, other than a gas or liquid storage tank, that is 
principally above ground and affixed to a permanent site, as well as a 
manufactured home on foundation. For the latter purpose, the term 
includes a building while in the course of construction, alteration, or 
repair, but does not include building materials or supplies intended 
for use in such construction, alteration, or repair, unless such 
materials or supplies are within an enclosed building on the 
premises. 

(r) SUBSTANTIAL DAMAGE means damage of any origin 
sustained by a structure whereby the cost of restoring the structure to 
its before-damaged condition would equal or exceed 50 percent of 
the market value of the structure before the damage occurred. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



(s) SUBSTANTIAL IMPROVEMENT means any repair, 
reconstruction, or improvement of a structure, the cost of which 
equals or exceeds 50 percent of the market value of the structure 
either (a) before the improvement or repair is started, or (b) if the 
structure has been damaged and is being restored, before the damage 
occurred. For the purposes of this definition, "substantial 
improvement" is considered to occur when the first alteration of any 
wall, ceiling, floor, or other structural part of the building 
commences, whether or not that alteration affects the external 
dimensions of the structure. 

(t) ZONE A means the 100-year floodplain area where the base 

flood elevation (BFE) has not been determined. To determine the 

BFE, use the best available federal, state, local, or other data. 

(u) ZONE A 1-30 and ZONE AE (for new and revised maps) means 

the 100-year floodplain where the base flood elevation has been 

determined. 

(v) ZONE AH and ZONE AO means the 100-year floodplain with 
flood depths of 1 to 3 feet, where a clearly defined channel does not 
exist, where the path of flooding is unpredictable, and where velocity 
flow may be evident. Such flooding is characterized by ponding or 
sheet flow. 

(w) ZONE A99 means areas to be protected from the 100-year flood 
by federal flood protection system under construction. Base flood 
elevations have not been determined. 

(x) ZONES B, C, AND X are areas identified in the community 
Flood Insurance Study as areas of moderate or minimal flood hazard. 
Zone X replaces Zones B and C on new and revised maps. 

3 Floodplain Area Boundaries. 

The floodplain area is herein established as an overlay district. The 
District includes all special flood hazard areas within the Town of 
Randolph designated on the Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) issued 
by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for the 
administration of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The 
FIRM maps indicate the one-hundred-year regulatory floodplain. The 
exact boundaries of the areas may be defined by the one-hundred-year 
base flood elevations shown on the FIRM and, further defined by the 
most current flood insurance study booklet. The FIRM, and Flood 
Insurance Study Booklet are incorporated into 200-1 6. E and, are on file 
with the. Planning Board, and the Department of Public Works, 
Engineering Division. 

4 Base Flood Elevation and Floodway Data, 
(a) Floodway data. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



1. In Zone A, A 1-30 and AE, along watercourses that have not 
had a regulatory floodway designated, the best available Federal, 
State, local, or other floodway data shall be used to prohibit 
encroachments in floodway which would result in any increase 
in flood levels within the community during the occurrence of 
the base flood discharge, 
(b) Base flood elevation data. 

1 . Base flood elevation data is required for subdivision 
proposals or other developments greater than 50 lots or five (5) 
acres, whichever is the lesser, within unnumbered A zones. 

5 Notification of Watercourse Alteration. 

(a) In a riverine situation, the Floodplain Manager for the Town of 
Randolph shall notify the following of any alteration or relocation of 
a watercourse: 

1. Adjacent Communities. 

2. NFIP State Coordinator, Massachusetts Department of 
Conservation and Recreation. 

3. NFIP Program Specialist FEMA (Federal Emergency 
Management Agency) Region 1 . 

6 Use regulations. 

The Floodplain Area is established as an overlay area to all zoning 
districts. All development in the area, including structural and non- 
structural activities, whether permitted by right or by special permit must 
be in compliance with Chapter 131, section 40, as amended of the 
Massachusetts General Laws and with the following: 

(1) Sections of the Massachusetts State Building Code (780 CMR) 
which addresses floodplain areas and coastal high hazard areas. 

(2) Wetlands Protection Regulations, Department of Environmental 
Protection. 

(3) Inland Wetlands Restrictions, Department of Environmental 
Protection (310 CMR 13.00). 

(4) Minimum Requirement for the Subsurface Disposal of Sanitary 
Sewage, Department of Environmental Protection (310 CMR 15, 
Title 5) 

Any variances from the provisions and requirements of the above 
referenced state regulations may only be granted in accordance with 
the required variance procedures of those state regulations. 
No variance to the Floodplain Areas may be granted by the Town of 
Randolph Zoning Board of Appeals. 

7 Other use regulations. 

(a) Within zones AH and AO on the FIRM, adequate drainage paths 
around structures on slopes, to guide floodwaters around and away 
from proposed structures. are required 



45 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANTSfUAL REPORT 



(b) In zones A 1-30 and AE along watercourses that have a 
regulatory floodway designated on the Town of Randolph FIRM or 
Flood Boundary and Floodway Map encroachments are prohibited in 
the regulatory floodway which would resuh in any increase in flood 
levels within the community during the occurrence of base flood 
discharge. 

(c) All subdivision proposals must assure that: 

1. Such proposals minimize flood damage; 

2. All public utilities and facilities are located and constructed 
to minimize or eliminate flood damage; 

3. Adequate drainage is provided to reduce exposure to flood 
hazards. 

(d) Existing contour intervals of site and elevations of existing 
structures must be included on plan proposal. 

(e) For development within the Special Flood Hazard Areas a copy 
of the development or site plan shall be transmitted to the 
Conservation Commission, Planning Board, Board of Health, Town 
Engineer and Building Commissioner for comments prior to issuing 
applicable permits or approvals. 

8 Permitted uses. 

The following uses of low flood damage potential and causing no 
obstructions to flood flows are encouraged provided they are permitted in 
the underlying district and they do not require structures, fill, or storage 
of materials or equipment: 

(a) Agricultural uses such as farming, grazing, truck farming, 
horticulture, etc. 

(b) Forestry and nursery uses. 

(c) Outdoor recreational uses, including fishing, boating, play area, 
etc. 

(d) Conservation of water, plants and wildlife. 

(e) Wildlife management areas, foot, bicycle, and/or horse paths. 

(f) Temporary nonresidential structures used in connection with 
fishing, growing, harvesting, storage or sale of crops raised on the 
premises. 

(g) Buildings lawfully existing prior to the adoption of these 
provisions. 

9 Public health. The Board of Health and Department of Public Works 
in reviewing all proposed water and sewer facilities to be located in the 
Floodplain Areas shall require that: 

(a) New and replacement water supply systems be designed to 
minimize or eliminate infiltration of flood waters into the systems. 

(b) New and replacement sanitary sewage systems be designed to 
minimize or eliminate infiltration of flood waters into the systems 



46 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

and discharges from the systems into flood waters and onsite waste 
disposal systems to be located to avoid impairment to them or 
contamination from them during flooding. 
10 Institutional open space districts. The following uses are permitted in 
an Institutional Open Space District: houses of worship, schools, parish 
houses, convents, cemeteries, rectories and accessory uses on the same 
lot with and customarily incidental to any of the above pemiitted uses. 

Council Order: 2012-018 

Fiscal Year 2012 Year-End Transfers 

The Randolph Town Council hereby approves the following budget transfers 
within the Fiscal Year 2012 operating budget to cover operational deficits 
and keep the Town of Randolph Fiscal Year 2012 in balance: 
TO FROM 

Health Department - Expenses - $60,000 DPW- Expense Snow and Ice - $20,000 



Order 2012-019 

Rezoning Request that was withdrawn by property owner. 

Order 2012-020 

PWED I and II Traffic Signage 

The Town Council moves to amend traffic rules and regulations of the Town 
of Randolph by rescinding all prior votes relative to traffic measures on 
South Main Street from project limit station 31.62 on the plan known as 
PWED I and II through and up to the Northern side of West Street to include 
the following amendments to plans Tl .2 through Tl . 10: 
T1.2 Similar to what is already in existence at this time. 
T1.3. On Memorial Parkway, where there was a "Right Turn Lane Must 
Turn Righf and "Right Turn on Red After Stop", those will be 
condensed to "No Turn on Red" sign throughout at the request of the 
Safety Officer. No handicapped parking on Memorial Parkway due to 
grading. Eliminating repetitive signs throughout. Condensing "One 
Hour Parking" and "No U-Tum" signs. 

T1.4 Condensing signage and correcting inconsistency, all "1 Hour 
Parking" will be Sam - 8pm. Entrance to Rockland Trust will be 
entrance only, no exit onto N. Main. Condensing "1 Hour Parking" and 
"No U-turn". Adding pedestrian arrows at crosswalks. 



Police Department - Salary - $1 19,000 



Debt Service - Expense - $40,000 
Health Insurance - Expense - $109,000 



Retirement - Expense - $49,000 
Town Manager Office - Salary - $2,500 
Town Counsel -Salary - $2,400 
Fire Department - Expense - $20,000 
Town Clerk - Expenses - $3,000 



Debt Service - Expense - $10,000 
Debt Service - Expense - $49,000 
Debt Service - Expense - $2,500 
Town Counsel - Expense - $2,400 
Debt Service -Expense - $20,000 
Debt Service - Expenses - $3,000 



47 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Tl .5 Shifting "One Way/Left Turn Only" sign coming out Subway onto 
Diauto Dri\e. Pedestrian arrow crossing, condensing "One Way" and 
"No U-Tum*\ Walgreens & CVS will be right turn only. Going down 
N. Main toward Milton area, right before Warren, one lane is now "Left 
Turn Only", other is "Straight Only". 

T1.6 No turn on red on Warren Street is new at the light. Right turn 

arrows coming up N. Main onto Warren. Signage condensed. 

T1.7 Condense "1 Hour Parking" and "No U-Tum" signs. "Do Not 

Enter" sign coming out of Cottage St., and eliminate repetitive parking 

signs. 

T1.8 Eliminate signage. Start new right turn/left turn lane in front of 
Sudbury farms. Eliminate lane on 28N. Councilors want to eliminate 
right tum/left turn signs if painted on ground. 

T1.9 Beginning and end of turning lanes eliminate signage based on 
conversations. Pedestrian arrows. 

Bus stops -Traveling North, first is Corcoran building, next in front of 
CVS (relocated from St. Mary's) so bus can stop at light and no longer 
block driveway out of Bank of America. Next is AXP. Eliminated stop 
in front of Randolph Savings Bank. Going South, stops at West Street, 
Sudbury Farms, Five Guys. Next stop outside of Rockland Trust. Next 
stop in front of Town Hall. 

Speed limit - for pedestrian safety, speed limit is being lowered to 25 
mph. 

Council Order: 2012-021 
Clear Sight Area 

The Town Council moves to strike the existing section of the zoning by-laws 
Section 200-32, Clear Sight Area, and replace it with new language as 
presented and incorporated herein. 
Comer Setback for Fences and Other Landscaping 

a) Comer lots and intersecting streets 

No building or stmcture in any district may be erected and no fence or 
vegetation, except tree tmnks, may be maintained or allowed to remain 
between three (3) feet and eight (8) feet above the plane through their 
center line grades between the property lines of intersecting streets and a 
line joining points on such lines 25 feet distant from their point of 
intersection or, in the case of a rounded comer, the point of intersection 
of their tangents. 

b) Driveways and Sidewalks or other pavement 

No fence or vegetation, except tree trunks, shall be located within a site 
triangle so as to obstruct visibility between three (3) feet and eight (8) 
feet above the plane through their curb grades. The site triangle is that 
area of the intersection of street rights-of-way or pavement with other 



48 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



streets, driveways or walkways, formed by the side lines of street rights- 
of-way or pavement, driveways or walkways and a line joining points on 
such lines ten feet distant from their point of intersection. 

Council Order: 2012-022 

Off Street Parking Regulations 

The Town Council moves to amend Article IV (4) of the Randolph Zoning 
By-laws "Off Street Parking Regulations" so that it reads as follows: 
§ 200-17. Applicability. 

No land shall be used or occupied and no structure shall be erected or used 
unless the off-street parking spaces as hereinafter required are provided. No 
application for a permit for the erection of a new structure or for the 
development of a land use shall be approved unless it includes a plan for off- 
street parking facilities to be maintained thereafter in accordance with the 
requirements of this article, except that such parking spaces are not required 
for any structure or use existing at the time of enactment of this article; 
provided, however, that parking spaces as specified in this article shall be 
provided for any enlargement or alteration to any such existing structure or 
use; provided, further, that the increase is greater than 15%. 

§ 200-18. Location. [Amended 5-22-2006 ATM, Art. 50, approved 10- 

17-2006] 

The off-street parking spaces required by this article shall be on the same lot 
as the structure or use they are intended to serve. Where such off street 
parking spaces can not be reasonably provided on the same lot as the 
principal use, parking may be located on other property. 

A. Planning Board may grant exceptions to allow provisions of the 
required spaces on a separate lot or lots within a radius of 600 feet, 
measured from the lot line of the principal use 

( 1 ) An applicant must demonstrate that the required spaces on a 
separate lot or lots within the district are located within a 
reasonable walking distance from the entrance to the 
establishment to be serviced. 

(2) Clear, pedestrian passage must be available with no crossing 
of an arterial street except at a signalized intersection along the 
pedestrian pathway. [Added 5-22-2006 ATM, Art. 50, approved 
10-17-2006] 

B. In the CSBD, parking shall be located in the rear of the lot. 
[Added 5-25-2005 ATM, Art. 5, approved 10-18-2005] 

§ 200-19. Dimensions. 

A. The gross area devoted to parking spaces and aisles or driveways 
shall be no less than 300 square feet for each vehicle. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



B. The net area for eacK individual parking space shall be no less 
than 162 square feet, having minimum dimensions of 9 feet by 18 
feet. 

C. A driveway may be considered a parking space for a one-family 
dwelling. 

§ 200-20. Street access. [Amended 5-22-2006 ATM, Art. 50, approved 
10-17-2006; 5-25-2005 ATM, Art. 5, approved 10-18-2005] 
Each parking space shall have a vehicular access to a street. Driveways, 
aisles and spaces in all Districts except residential single family or two 
family shall be so arranged that vehicles will leave and enter the street 
with a forward motion. 

§ 200-21. Construction requirements. [Amended 4-16-1996 ATM, Art. 
11, approved 7-29-1996] 

Every parcel of land which, after the effective date of this chapter, is 
changed to a parking area for more than five vehicles, or to a drive-in 
business or motor vehicles sales or service establishment, shall be 
developed as follows, subject to the approval of the plans as defined in 
the Town of Randolph Zoning Bylaws Section XI Site Plan and Design 
Review: 

A. Such area, where subject to wheeled traffic, shall be smoothly 
graded, properly drained and treated with bituminous or other all- 
weather hard surface and shall have appropriate bumper or wheel 
guards where needed. 

B. Where such area abuts a Residential District, it shall not be 
located within 10 feet of the lot line in a Business District or 
Business Professional District or within 50 feet of the lot line in an 
hidustrial District; and, when required by the Site Plan 
Administrator, in all Districts it shall have a wall or fence of solid 
appearance or tight evergreen hedge having a height of no less than 
five feet which shall be erected and maintained between such area 
and the property in the Residential District. 

C. Any light used to illuminate said parking areas shall be so 
arranged as to reflect light away from adjoining premises and streets. 

D. The surfaced area of all parking areas and parking spaces shall be 
set back a minimum of five feet from all street lines except when an 
access drive crosses the street layout. Such setback area shall be 
landscaped and maintained. 

E. Tiered parking. 

Nothing in this section shall prohibit the construction of parking 
shelves or garages where it is deemed beneficial to the community. 
All setbacks, height, and other requirements shall be that of the 
underlying zoning district. Provided that parking garages, parking 
decks or any other parking structures and the parking of any motor 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



vehicles shall be limited to parking at a maximum of two tiers above 
grade. [Added 5-25-2005 ATM, Art. 5, approved 10-18-2005] 
F. Parking lot design. 

In addition to the provisions above, new and renovated off-street 
parking areas shall be constructed in accordance with the guidelines 
as defined in Section XI Site Plan and Design Review 200-94 B.6. 
Paving, alteration or installation of parking lots, driveways, or 
similar shall require a permit by the Building Commissioner in all 
zoning districts. [Added 5-25-2005 ATM, Art. 5, approved 10-18- 
2005] 

§ 200-22. Required number of spaces. 

Off-street parking spaces shall be provided in accordance with the 
following minimum requirements: 
A Residential 

Single Family - two spaces for each dwelling unit 

Multi-family - 2 spaces for each dwelling unit 

Two Family - two spaces for each dwelling unit 

B Commercial/Business - one space for each 200 square feet of 

gross floor area on the first floor of a building and one space for each 

400 square feet of gross floor area thereafter for all floors used for 

business purposes, excluding storage area. 

C Warehouse/Industrial - one space for each two employees, plus 
space for every company-owned and operated vehicle, plus spaces 
for customer's vehicles as determined appropriate by the Building 
Commissioner or Site Plan Administrator. 

D Eating/Drinking Establishments - one space for each two seats 
provided for patron use 

E Assembly/Meeting Halls/Theatres - one space for each 5 seats or 
for each 1 00 square feet of auditorium area (if there are no fixed 
seats) 

F Hotel/Motel - one space per room/dwelling unit 
G Mixed Uses - where a building has a mixture of uses for which 
off-street parking space is required, the number of spaces will be the 
sum of the requirements of the various individual uses 
H Other - reasonable off-street parking requirements for uses not 
listed in this section shall be determined by the Site Plan 
Administrator 
§ 200-23. Occupancy permits. 

No certificate of occupancy shall be issued unless the required parking 
facilities shall have been provided in accordance with those designated 
and approved on the approved plan. 



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2012-023 

GENERAL BYLAWS REVISIONS 

PART I: ADMINISTRATIVE LEGISLATION 



1 . General Provisions 1:1 

4. Audit, Annual 4:1 

9. Boards, Committees and Commissions 9:1 

Article I Terms of Office 

Article II Community Preservation Committee 

Article III Town Property Advisory Committee 
12. Treasurer 12:1 

17. Finance Committee 17:1 

18. Finances 18:1 

31. Meetings 31:1 

36. Officers and Employees 36:1 

Article I Town Clerk 

Article II Office Hours 

Article III Town Treasurer 

39. Personnel 39:1 

42. Planning Board 42: 1 

45. Property, Sale of 45:1 

48. Public Works, Department of 48: 1 

50. Purchasing and Contracts 50:1 

53. Recreation, Board of 53: 1 

5 6 . Report, Annual 56:1 

61. Town Manager 61:1 

68. Water Commissioners 68:1 

PART II: GENERAL LEGISLATION 

73. Alarm Systems 73:1 

Article I Police Department 

Article II Fire Department 

Article III Key Boxes 

76. Alcoholic Beverages 76: 1 

79. Animals 79:1 

83. Building Construction 83:1 

86. Buildings, Moving of 86: 1 

87. Demolition of Historic Buildings 87: 1 

90. Burning, Outdoor 90:1 

93 . Business Hours 93 : 1 

105 Fees 105:1 



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109. Gas Stations 109:1 

113. Herbicides 113:1 

116. Hunting and Firearms 116:1 

121. Junk Dealers 121:1 

127. Licenses and Permit 127: 1 

Article I Fees 

Article II Delinquent Taxpayers 

140. Peace and Good Order 140:1 

141. Unreasonable Noise 141:1 

1 43 . Peddling and Soliciting 1 43 : 1 

Article I Hawkers and Peddlers 

Article II Prohibited Merchandise 
Article III Solicitors and Canvassers 

144. Ice Cream Vending Permits 144: 1 

147. Property Maintenance 147:1 

151. Quarries 151:1 

157. Sales 157:1 

Article I Yard Sales 

Article II Sales by Non-owners 

161. Sewers and Drainage 161:1 

166. Streets and Sidewalks 166:1 

1 76. Vehicles, Junk and Unregistered 1 76: 1 

179. Vehicles and Traffic 179:1 

182. Vehicles, Removal of 182:1 

1 88. Vending Machines, Printed Matter 188:1 

192. Water 192:1 

Article I Unpaid Charges 

Article II Water Supply Emergencies 

196. Wetlands 196:1 

200. Zoning 200:1 

300 FeeSchedule 300:1 

301. Fine Schedule 301:1 

APPENDIX 

A 1 . Acceptances of General Laws A 1 : 1 

A2. Officers, Boards, Committees and Commissions A2: 1 

A3. Special Acts A3:l 

A4. Miscellaneous A4: 1 

DISPOSITION LIST 
INDEX 



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PART I 

ADMINISTRATIVE LEGISLATION 



Chapter 1 
GENERAL PROVISIONS 



§ 1-1. 

§1-2. 
§ 1-3. 
§ 1-4. 



Time limit for prosecution of violations. 

When effective. 

Repealer. 

Amendment of ordinances. 



§ 1-6. Remediation. 

§1-7. Code enforcement officer. 

§ 1-8. Municipal hearings officer. 

§1-9. Noncriminal disposition. 



§1-5. General penalty. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 

Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 1-1. Time limit for prosecution of violations. 

All complaints and prosecutions for breach of these ordinances shall be 
instituted and commenced within 60 days, unless otherwise provided, from 
the time of committing such breach. 
§ 1-2. When effective. 

These ordinances shall take effect from and after their adoption by the Town 
Council, as provided by law. 
§ 1-3. Repealer. 

Upon adoption by the Town Council, as may be provided by law of these 
ordinances, all previous ordinances now or heretofore in force shall become 
null and void, except for the following, which are specifically saved from 
repeal: 

A. Any vote of the Town, ordinances, or other action establishing or 
amending Classification, Salary, Wage and Miscellaneous Compensation 
Schedules is not hereby repealed. 

B. While an effort has been made to locate and identify every 
preexisting ordinance of the Town, any ordinance which, having been 
overlooked or undiscovered as an originating source ordinance for this 
recodification, is not specifically listed in the schedule entitled "General 
Code Publishers Corporation Table of Source Sections or Distribution of 
Legislation List," on file with the Town Clerk, is not hereby repealed and 
shall instead continue in full force and effect until further action of the 
Town Council. 

§ 1-4. Amendment of ordinances. 

These ordinances may be amended at any meeting of The Town Council, in 
accordance with the Town Charter. 
§ 1-5. General penalty. 

The penalty for breach of any ordinance, unless otherwise provided for 
herein, shall be a fine in accordance with the fine schedule. The penalty 



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provided shall be applicable to all Town Ordinances which do not otherwise 
provide for a penalty. 
§ 1-6. Remediation. 

The violator shall be required to remedy the violation in addition to the fine. 
§ 1-7. Code enforcement officer. 

The Town may appoint one or more persons to enforce the compliance of the 
Town General and Zoning Ordinances, state laws and regulations and 
wetland rules. 

§ 1-8. Municipal hearing officer. 

The Town shall appoint one or more persons to act as the Municipal 
Hearings Officer. The Hearings Officer shall act as the appeal process 
between the Code Enforcement Officer and the Violator. 
§ 1-9. Noncriminal disposition. 

A. Any person who violates any ordinance shall be fined in accordance 
with the fine schedule or penalty section of the General Ordinances of 
the Town of Randolph. 

B. The enforcing person shall make a record of complaint, in the form 
of a "Violation Notice," and shall include to the extent possible, name 
and address of person violating; name and address of owner of the 
property to which the violation has taken place; date, time, and motor 
vehicle registration number. In the event that the violator refuses to 
provide the above-noted requested information, or in the event that such 
any information provided by the violator proves to be false, then said 
person may be fined additionally in accordance with the General 
Ordinances of the Town of Randolph. The enforcing person shall give 
the violator a notice of the violation and fine, if in the event the enforcing 
person can not hand deliver the violation notice, the notice may be sent 
by certified mail, return receipt requested, to the last known address of 
the offender, or the address where the violation took place. A copy of 
each "Violation Notice:" shall be sent to the owner of real estate for the 
location where the violation took place. 

C. No person, being the landlord or person in charge of a residential 
structure shall permit, or suffer, the repeated violations of these 
ordinances, after such notice thereof The legal owner of real property 
within the Town of Randolph may be fine additionally for repeated 
violations in accordance with the General Ordinances of the Town of 
Randolph. It shall be considered a defense that the landlord or person in 
charge of a residential structure shall have made a good faith effort 
including the seeking of a court order to prevent said violations. 

D. Fine and Violation may be disposed of pursuant to M.G.L. c. 40, 
Section 2 ID, by the non-criminal disposition procedures stated, however, 
that if a violator fails to follow the procedure and requirements of said 
section, the fines shall become a lien on the property of the real property. 



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or shall be recovered by indictment or a complaint pursuant to M.G.L. c. 
40, Section 41. 

E. The Local Code Enforcement Officer shall indicate on the notice of 
violation that the violation is either 1) a written warning or 2) a code 
violation. If the notice is for one or more violations, the Code 
Enforcement Officer shall indicate on the notice the scheduled 
assessments for each violation alleged. If the notice is for a continuing 
condition, the Code Enforcement Officer shall indicate that the condition 
must be corrected within 24-hours of receipt of such notice. Failure to 
correct condition within 24-hours may serve as grounds for criminal 
prosecution. 

F. The Violator may appeal any decision of the Code Enforcement 
Officer to the Municipal Hearings Officer. The Appeal must be initiated 
within 14 calendar days of the person receiving such notice. The 
Hearings Officer shall act on the request for a hearing within 14 calendar 
days of receiving notice. 

G. Final disposition. Any person notified to appear before the Clerk of a 
District Court as hereinbefore provided may so appear and confess the 
offense charged either personally or through a duly authorized agent or 
by mailing to the Town Clerk of the Town of Randolph, together with 
the notice, such specific sum of money as the Town shall fix as penalty 
for violating the ordinance, rule or regulation. Such payment shall, if 
mailed, be made only by postal notice, money order. Upon receipt of the 
notice, the Town Clerk shall forthwith notify the District Court Clerk of 
such payment, and the receipt by the District Court Clerk of such 
notification shall operate as a final disposition of the case. The case shall 
be governed by the provisions of M.G.L c. 40, § 2 ID. 



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Chapter 4 
AUDIT, ANNUAL 

§4-L Supervision. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



§ 4-1. Supervision. 

There shall be an annual audit of the Town's accounts under the supervision 
of the Director of Accounts of the Department of Revenue, in accordance 
with the provisions of M.G.L c. 44, § 35. 



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Chapter 9 

BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS 



ARTICLE I TERMS OF OFFICE 

§ 9-1. Committee members. 
ARTICLE II COMMUNITY 
PRESERVATION COMMITTEE 
§ 9-2. Establishment. 
Act surcharge. 

§ 9-3. Appointment; membership. 



§ 9-4. Duties regarding 
community preservation. 

§ 9-5. Duties regarding acquisition of open space. 

§ 9-6. Recommendations regarding funding. 
§ 9-7. Exemption from Community Preservation 



ARTICLE III TOWN PROPERTY 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
[HISTORY: Adopted as indicated in article histories. Amendments noted where 
applicable.] 

GENERAL REFERENCES 
Finance Committee - See Ch. 17. Town Council- See Ch. 61. 

Planning Board - See Ch. 42. Water Commissioners - See Ch. 68. 

Board of Recreation - See Ch. 53. 



ARTICLE I 

Terms of Office 

[Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995] 
§ 9-1. Committee members. 

A. Unless otherwise authorized by the Massachusetts General Laws, the 
term of office of any member of a standing committee shall be three 
years. 

B. Unless otherwise required by direction of the Town Manager or by 
state statute or by the requirements of a bond issue, the term of office of 
a member of a committee shall be one year. 

ARTICLE II 
Community Preservation Committee 
[Adopted 4-25-2006 ATM, approved 10-18-2005] 
§ 9-2. Establishment. 

The Randolph Community Preservation Committee is established consisting 
of nine members pursuant to Chapter 44B of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth. 

§ 9-3. Appointment; membership. 

The Randolph Community Preservation Committee shall be appointed by the 
Town Manager and shall consist of one member each from as follows: 

A. For an initial term of three years and thereafter upon reappointment 
for terms of three years, or so long as such designee remains a member 
of such Committee or board, one member of the Randolph Conservation 
Commission as designated by the Conservation Commission, one 
member of the Historical Commission as designated by the Historical 
Commission, and one member of the Randolph Planning Board as 
designated by the Planning Board. One Community Member who is a 



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Randolph resident, chosen by the Town Manager and one Community 
Member who is a Randolph resident appointed by the Town Manager 
from the Randolph business community defined as those who own or 
operate a business within the limits of the Town of Randolph. 

B. For an initial term of two years and thereafter upon reappointment 
for terms of three years, or so long as such designee remains a member 
of such commission or board, one member of the Recreation 
Commission as designated by the Recreation Commission; one member 
of the Randolph Housing Authority as designated by the Housing 
Authority. 

C. For an initial term of one year and thereafter for a term of three 
years, one resident from the community, appointed by the Town 
Manager. 

D. For an initial term of one year and thereafter for a term of three years, 
or so long as such designee remains a member of such board, one 
member of the Town Council as appointed by the Council President and 
ratified by the Town Council. 

§ 9-4. Duties regarding community preservation. 

The Randolph Community Preservation Committee shall study the needs, 
possibilities, and resources of the Town regarding community preservation. 
The Committee shall consult with existing municipal boards and hold one or 
more public informational hearing(s) yearly on the needs, possibilities and 
resources of the Town regarding community preservation. This meeting shall 
be publicly posted for each of two weeks preceding a hearing in the local 
newspaper. 

§ 9-5. Duties regarding acquisition of open space. 

The Community Preservation Committee shall make recommendations to the 
Town Council for the acquisition, creation, and preservation of open space, 
for the acquisition, preservation, rehabilitation, and restoration of historic 
resources, for the acquisition, creation, and preservation of land for 
recreational use, for the creation, preservation, and support of community 
housing and for the rehabilitation or restoration of open space, historical 
resources, land for recreational use, and community housing that is acquired 
or created as provided in the Community Preservation Act. With respect to 
community housing, the Community Preservation Committee shall 
recommend, whenever possible, the reuse of existing buildings or 
construction of new buildings on previously developed sites. 
§ 9-6. Recommendations regarding funding. 

The Community Preservation Committee may include in its recommendation 
to the Town Council a recommendation to set aside for later spending funds 
for specific purposes consistent with the community preservation act. 



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§ 9-7. Exemption from Community Preservation Act surcharge. [Added 
2-25-2006 ATM by Art. 4, approved 10-17-2006] 

Applications for exemption from the Community Preservation Act Surcharge 
must be filed with the Office of the Board of Assessors no later than three 
months after issuance of the actual real estate tax bill. 

ARTICLE III 
Town Property Advisory Committee 

[Adopted 5-15-2007 ATM by Art. 8, approved 8-20-2007, dissolved 
October 2012] 

Chapter 12 
TREASURER 
§ 12-1. Redemption of tax title real estate. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-25-2006 ATM by Art. 30, approved 10-17-2006. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 12-1. Redemption of tax title real estate. 

A. Pursuant to the provisions of M.G.L. c.60 § 62A, the Treasurer of the 
Town of Randolph ("Town") may enter into a written payment 
agreement ("Agreement") with any person(s) entitled to redeem 
ownership of parcels of real estate ("Redeemer") which have been taken 
by the Town as a result of non-payment of real estate taxes. The 
Agreement shall be executed by the Town and Redeemer and shall set 
forth the terms and conditions for payment of the delinquent taxes 
interest and any other costs, fees or charges associated with same. 

B. The Redeemer of the following assessment categories of real 
property shall be eligible to enter into an Agreement provided for in the 
preceding paragraph: 

(1) Commercial property; and 

(2) Residential property. 

C. The following conditions must be met prior to the Treasurer and 
Redeemer entering into an Agreement: 

( 1 ) The Town has not filed a petition to foreclose the rights of 
redemption with the Land Court and the recording date of the 
Instrument of Taking recorded in the Norfolk Registry of Deeds or 
Norfolk Registry District of the Land Court must be no more than 10 
years from the date of the proposed Agreement; 

(2) All real estate taxes due for the current fiscal year assessed 
against the parcel must be paid to date; 

(3) The Redeemer, at the time of execution of said Agreement, must 
pay to the Town a minimum of 25% of the amount due to redeem the 



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Parcel. The Redeemer must then agree to pay the remaining balance 
due to the Town in three equal installments over a period not to 
exceed three years, with one installment payment due each year. 

D. After the Town has received the initial installment and two 
additional installment payments pursuant to the Agreement, the 
Redeemer shall be entitled to a credit equal to 50% of the accrued 
interest on the delinquent tax amount. This credit shall be applied against 
the fmal installment due under the Agreement. 

E. During the term of the Agreement, the Treasurer may not bring an 
action to foreclose the tax title of the Redeemer unless payments are not 
made in accordance with the schedule provided in the Agreement or 
timely payments are not made on other amounts due to the municipality 
that are a lien on the same parcel. 

Chapter 17 
FINANCE COMMITTEE- (Dissolved) 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 Annual Town Meeting, Art. 8, approved 
10-27-1995. Amendments noted where applicable. Dissolved October 
2012] 

GENERAL REFERENCE 
Annual Audit, see Chapter 4 

Chapter 18 
FINANCES 

§ 18-1. Certain charges to be included as liens. § 18-2. Credit 

cards and debit cards. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-16-1996 ATM by Art. 12, approved 7-29-1996. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

GENERAL REFERENCES 
Finance Committee - See Ch. 17. Junk/Unregistered 
vehicles - See Ch. 176-3D. 
Licenses and permits - See Ch. 127. 



§ 18-1. Certain charges to be included as liens. [Amended 4-25-2006 
ATM by Art. 32, approved 10-17-2006] 

The following municipal charges shall be included as liens created by M.G.L 
c. 40, § 58 to be added to and collected as unpaid real estate taxes: police 
alarms (Ch. 73 of the Code); fire alarms (Ch. 73 of the Code); water and 
sewer use charge (Ch. 192 of the Code); ambulances services (Ch. 105 of the 
Code); dog violations (Art. 7 of the 1994 Annual Town Meeting); dishonored 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



checks (.Ajrt. 24 of the 1991 .\nnual Town Meeting). Non criminal disposition 
ticket fines and penalties pursuant to M.GU. c. 40, S.21D. for violation of 
Board of Health Rules and Regulations Article 1 Sec. 1.2 (A). 
§ 18-2. Credit cards and debit cards. [Added 11-2-1999 STM by Art. 73, 
approved 1-31-2000] 

Town Council hereb\' authorizes town departments, committees and 
commissions, to use Credit Cards and Debit Cards for collection of fees, 
fines and penalties pursuant to an\' policies, as approxed by the Town 
Manager. 

Chapter 27 

LANDSC APE REMEW BOARD - (Dissolved) 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 Annual Town .Meeting. Art. 8, approved 
10-27-1995. Ch. 27. Sec. 27-1 through 27-5. Landscape Re\1ew Board 
deleted 11-1-1999. Art. 4. approved 1-31-2000] 

Chapter 31 
MEETINGS 

§ 31-1. Town Charter. § 31-3. Reports. 

§ 31-2. Petitions. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



§ 31-1. Town Charter [Amended 4-26-1999 ATM by Art. 19, approved 
9-30-1999: amended 6-17-2002 ST.M by Art. 3, approved 10-3-2002] 

Refer to the Town Chaner. 
§31-2. Petitions. 

The To\^"n Council shall hold a public hearing and act with respect to every 
petition which is addressed to it. which is signed by 150 voters, or more and 
which seeks the passage of a measure. The heanng shall be held by the 
Tow n Council, or by a committee or subcommittee thereof and the action by 
the To\^n Council shall be taken not later than 3 months after the petition is 
filed with the Clerk of the Council as may be appropriate. Hearings on 2 or 
more petitions filed under this section may be held at the same time and 
place. The Clerk of the Council shall mail notice of the hearing to the 10 
persons whose names appear first on the petition at least 48 hours before the 
heanng. Notice, by publication, of all such hearings shall be at public 
expense. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



§ 31-3. Reports. [Amended 11-9-1998 STM by Art. 9, approved 2-8- 
1999] 

Refer to the Town Charter, Town Manager, Powers and Duties, Section 3-2. 

Chapter 36 
OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES 

ARTICLE I TOWN CLERK § 36-3. Hours established; exception 

§ 36-1. Reports and records. ARTICLE III TOWN TREASURER 
§ 36-2. Zoning Code. § 36-4. Disposal of property 

ARTICLE II OFFICE HOURS 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

GENERAL REFERENCES 
Personnel - See Ch. 39 

ARTICLE I 
Tow n Clerk 

§ 36-1. Reports and records. 

The Town Clerk shall keep a file of all Town reports, reports submitted by all 
committees chosen by the Town and all original documents relating to the 
affairs of the Town which come into the Town Clerk's custody. The Town 
Clerk shall suitably index all such reports and all the records of the Town in 
the Town Clerk's custody in a manner convenient for reference and 
examination. 

§ 36-2. Zoning Code. [Added 5-10-2000 ATM by Art. 4, approved 9-27- 
2000] 

The Town Clerk is the responsible Town department head to allocate the 
reference numbers and update the Zoning Code. 

ARTICLE II 
Office Hours 
§ 36-3. Hours established; exception. 

The doors of the offices of all Town departments shall be kept open at all 
times during the conduct of regular Town business; hours at the Town Hall 
shall be posted. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



ARTICLE III 
Town Treasurer 

§ 36-4. Disposal of property. 

The Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Town Council, shall, for the 
best interests of the Town, dispose of all property owned by the Town on 
account of foreclosure of tax titles. 

Chapter 39 
PERSONNEL 

[The Personnel Code is produced as a separate document. 
See the Town Manager for details.] 
§6. Officers and Employees (Ch. 39) 
[Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art 8] 

Chapter 42 
PLANNING BOARD 
§ 42-1. Establishment; terms of members. § 42-4. Powers and duties. 
§ 42-2. Town planner § 42-5. Review of plans. 

§ 42-3. Vacancies § 42-6. Zoning Code. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

GENERAL REFERENCES 

Zoning - See Ch. 200. 

§ 42-1. Establishment; terms of members. [Amended 4-16-1996 ATM by 
Art. 10, approved 7-29-1996] 

A board of five members is hereby established to be known as the "Planning 
Board." The terms of members shall be five years. They shall be appointed 
by the Town Manager. 
§ 42-2. Town planner. 

The Town Manager shall have the power to appoint a Town Planner. 

§ 42-3. Vacancies. [Amended 4-16-1996 ATM by Art. 10, approved 7-29- 

1996] 

VACANT 

§ 42-4. Powers and duties. [Amended 4-16-1996 ATM by Art. 10, ! 
approved 7-29-1996] 

The duties of such Planning Board shall be such as are stated in M.G.L c. 41, 
§ 81B, and, further, to consider and advise upon municipal improvements 
either at the request of other officials of the Town or upon its own initiative. 
It shall consider and develop a Town plan, with special attention to main 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



ways, land developments, zoning, playgrounds and parks and sites for 
permanent school plants. The Planning Board shall meet at regular intervals. 
It may hold public meetings. It shall at all times have access to public 
documents or information in the possession of any Town official or 
department. It shall examine the plans for the exterior of any building, 
monument or similar feature, and for the development and treatment of the 
grounds about the same before the adoption thereof, and may make such 
recommendations thereon as it may deem needful. It may provide for public 
lectures and other educational work in connection with its recommendations. 
It may incur expenses necessary to the carrying on of its work within the 
amount of its annual or special appropriations. 
§ 42-5. Review of plans. 

See Site Plan and Design Review in the Zoning Ordinances Chapter 200-90 
through 200-100. 

§ 42-6. Zoning Code. [Added 5-10-2000 ATM by Art. 4, approved 9-27- 
2000] 

Now Chapter 36-2 
Chapter 45 
PROPERTY, SALE OF 
§ 45-1. Approval or disapproval by Town Council. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



§ 45-1. Approval or disapproval by Town Council. 

On all open areas, agricultural areas or farm areas, etc., where the Town has 
the right of first refusal on a proposed sale of the above-mentioned land, and 
on any land offered to the Town for purchase, it shall be mandatory that, 
before said sale takes place, a Council Order shall be presented to the Town 
Council at a regular or Special meeting of the Town Council for purchase 
approval or disapproval by the Town Council. 

Chapter 48 
PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 
§ 48-1. Public hearing on rate changes. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 48-1. Public hearing on rate changes. 

The Town Council shall hold a public hearing before any change is acted 
upon by the Town Council for any water, sewer, betterments or related 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



charges. Such hearing shall be publically advertised in local newspapers at 
least Fourteen (14) days before such public hearings. 

Chapter 50 
PURCHASING AND CONTRACTS 
§ 50-1. Award of contracts to Town Officials. § 50-2. Purchasing procedure. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



§ 50-1. Award of contracts to Town Officials. 

No elected or appointed member of any committee or board in the Town of 
Randolph shall be awarded any contract to be exercised in the Town of 
Randolph, the value of which is in excess of $ 1 ,000 unless said contract was 
open to competitive bidding. 
§ 50-2. Purchasing procedure. 

The Town of Randolph shall use the Mass. Uniform Procurement ACT - 
M.G.L. 30B. 

Chapter 53 
RECREATION, BOARD OF 
§ 53-1. Establishment. § 53-5. Director of recreation. 

§ 53-2. Membership. § 53-6. Office; accounts and records. 

§ 53-3. Terms of office; vacancies. § 53-7. Acquisition or taking of property. 

§ 53-4. Officers; rules and regulations. § 53-8. Expenses. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 Annual Town Meeting, Art. 8, approved 
10-27-1995. Amendments noted where applicable. 

GENERAL REFERENCES 
Credit and Debit Card - See Ch. 18-2. 

There shall be a Board of Recreation to consist of seven members. 

The Board of Recreation shall create policy concerning the operation of 

recreation programs. 

§ 53-1. Establishment. 

Under the provisions of M.G.L c. 45, § 14, there is hereby estabhshed in the 
Town of Randolph a Board of Recreation. 
§ 53-2. Membership. 

The Board of Recreation shall consist of seven persons, with staggered terms, 
serving without pay, who shall be appointed by the Town Manager. 
§ 53-3. Terms of office; vacancies. 

The term of office shall be for three years, or until their successors are 
appointed and qualified, except that the members of such Board first 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

appointed shall be appointed for terms of one, two and three years, and 
thereafter the term of office shall expire after three years. Vacancies 
occurring otherwise than by expiration of term shall be filled by the Town 
Manager for the unexpired term. 
§ 53-4. Officers; rules and regulations. 

Immediately after appointment the Board of Recreation shall meet and 
organize by electing one of its members Chairperson and such other officers 
as may be deemed necessary. The Board shall have the power to adopt rules 
and regulations to conduct and regulate recreation and the means thereof and 
rules to protect the rights and property vested in the Town and under the 
control of the Board and shall have such other powers as may be necessary 
for the proper discharge of its duties. 
§ 53-5. Director of recreation. 

The Town Manager shall have the power to appoint a Director of Recreation. 
§ 53-6. Office; accounts and records. 

The Board of Recreation shall) cause to be kept proper accounts and records 

of the proceedings of the Board. 

§ 53-7. Acquisition or taking of property. 

The Board of Recreation may, with the approval of the Town Council, take 
and hold, by purchase, gift or devise, real and/or personal property and 
receive gifts and donations, bequests to be applied, principal or income, for 
recreation purposes. The Board shall recommend to the Town Manager and 
Town Council the acquisition of property to be used for recreation purposes. 
§ 53-8. Expenses. 

Annually in the authorized manner the Board shall transmit the estimates of 
the amount of money required for the purposes of the Board for the ensuing 
fiscal year. When approved by the Town Manager, the estimates may be 
placed in the annual Town budget and the funds appropriated for the 
operation and extension of the recreation system subject to Town Council 
approval. 

Chapter 56 
REPORT, ANNUAL 

§ 56-1. Delivery. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



§ 56-1. Delivery. 

The Town Manager shall produce a bound annual report no later than June 1 
of each year; these reports shall be available at Town Hall and the Turner 
Free Library. 



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Chapter 61 
Town Manager 



§ 61-1. Appointment, Term of office; Qualifications. 
§ 61-2. Powers and Duties generally. 
§ 61-3. Compensation. 



§ 61-4. Removal of Town Manager. 
§ 61-5. Acting Town Manager. 
§ 61-6. Evaluation. 



[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 Annual Town Meeting, Art. 8, approved 
10-27-1995. Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 61-1. Appointment, Term of office; Qualifications. 

A. Appointment, Term of Office - The town council, by the affirmative 
vote of at least two-thirds of the members, shall appoint a town manager 
to serve for a term of office of up to 5 years. 

B. Qualifications - The town manager shall be a person of proven 
administrative ability, specially qualified by education and training with 
at least 5 years full-time paid experience as a city or town manager, or an 
assistant city or town manager or the equivalent public or private sector 
level experience. The town council may, from time to time, establish 
such additional qualifications as seems necessary and appropriate. The 
town manager shall devote his fiill time to the office and shall not hold 
any other public office, elected or appointed, nor shall he engage in any 
other business, occupation or profession during his term unless such 
action is approved, in advance, by the town council. The town council 
may, by ordinance, establish other qualifications for the office of town 
manager. 

§ 61-2. Powers and Duties generally. 

The Town Manager shall be the Chief Administrative Officer of the Town 
and shall be responsible to the Town Council for the proper administration of 
all Town affairs placed under his charge under the charter. The powers and 
duties of the Town Manager shall include, but are not intended to be limited 
to, the following: 

He shall supervise, direct and be responsible for the efficient administration 
of all Town activities placed under his control by the charter, by ordinance, 
or otherwise, including all officers appointed by him and their respective 
agencies. He shall be responsible for the coordination of the activities of all 
agencies under his control with the activities of all other Town agencies, 
including those elected by the voters of Randolph and those appointed by 
other elected officials. Except as otherwise provided by this charter and 
subject to the civil service law and any collective bargaining agreements as 
may be applicable, the Town Manager shall appoint, based upon merit and 
fitness alone, all department heads, officers, subordinates, employees and all 
appointed multiple member bodies for whom no other method of selection is 
provided in this charter except employees of the school department. 
Appointments made by the Town Manager shall become effective upon the 



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approval of the council; provided, however, that such approval is received 
within 15 days of filing such notice of appointment. If the Town Council 
shall fail to act, appointments made by the Town Manager shall become 
effective on the fifteenth day following the day on which notice of the 
proposed appointment is filed with the Town Council. For the purpose of 
this section, notice of appointment shall be considered filed with the Town 
Council when such notice is filed at an open meeting of the Town Council. 
Department heads shall appoint all officers, subordinates and employees 
within their department subject to the approval of the Town Manager. He 
shall administer all personnel policies, practices, or rules and regulations, any 
compensation plan and any related matters for all municipal employees and 
administer all collective bargaining agreements, except for school department 
agreements, entered into by the Town. He shall be responsible for the 
negotiation of all union and non-union contracts with Town employees over 
wages and other terms and conditions of employment, except employees of 
the school department. The Town Manager may, subject to the approval of 
the Town Council, employ Special Counsel to assist in the performance of 
these duties. Contracts shall be subject to the approval of the Town Council. 
He shall be responsible for making sure that all of the provisions of the laws 
of the Commonwealth, the Town Charter, Town ordinances and other votes 
of the Town Council which require enforcement by him, or by officers or 
employees subject to his supervision, are faithfully carried out and enforced. 
He shall prepare and submit an annual operating budget and a capital outlay 
program as provided in Article 5. He shall be responsible for making sure 
that a full and complete record of the financial and administrative activities 
of the Town is kept and shall render a complete report to the Town Council 
at the end of each fiscal year and at such times as the Town Council may 
reasonably require. He shall execute contracts, subject to such prior Town 
Council approval as may be prescribed by ordinance. He shall have full 
jurisdiction over the rental and use of all Town facilities, except school or 
library buildings and grounds and properties under the jurisdiction of the 
Conservation Commission pursuant to Section 8C of Chapter 40 of the 
General Laws. He shall be responsible for the maintenance and repair of all 
Town-owned property, including school or library buildings and grounds but 
not including vacant land under the jurisdiction of the Conservation 
Commission pursuant to said Section 8C of said Chapter 40, if a Town 
ordinance authorizing a central Town maintenance department is created. He 
may at any time inquire into the conduct of office of any officer, employee or 
department under his supervision. He shall be responsible for ensuring that a 
full and complete inventory of all property owned by the Town, both real and 
personal, is kept. He shall keep the Town Council fully advised as to the 
financial condition of the Town and of the administration of the Town's 
affairs by filing written reports with the Town Council not less than quarterly 



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throughout the year. He shall, from time to time, as in his judgment the needs 
of the Town require, make such recommendations to the Town Council for 
action to be taken by it as he may deem to be necessary or desirable. He may 
authorize any subordinate officer or employee to exercise any power or 
perfomi any function which he is authorized to exercise or perform; 
provided, however, that all acts performed under any such delegation shall be 
deemed to be acts of the Town Manager. He shall determine the existence of 
a public emergency or danger and shall assume responsibility for the 
maintenance of public safety, public order and enforcement of the laws of the 
Commonwealth. The Manager shall notify the Council President as soon as 
practical, but within 24 hours, of such a public emergency or danger and of 
the actions taken. Should the public emergency continue more than 24 
hours, the Town Council may meet to review, ratify or terminate such public 
emergency. He shall execute all deeds conveying Town real property; 
provided; however, that any such conveyance shall have been previously 
authorized by the vote of the Town Council pursuant to the applicable 
provisions of the laws of the Commonwealth. He shall publish an annual 
report comprised of the complete statistical record of the operations of every 
Town department, commission and committee for the preceding year and 
such report shall be published annually and made available for distribution to 
the public not later than 4 months after the end of the period on which the 
report is based. He shall perform such other functions as may, from time to 
time, be assigned to the office of Town Manager by ordinance or other vote 
of the Town Council, or otherwise. 
§ 61-3. Compensation. 

The Town Manager shall receive compensation as may be established by the 
Town Council, from time to time, for the office of Town Manager. 
§ 61-4. Removal of Town Manager. 

The person serving as Town Manager shall cease to be Town Manager upon 
expiration of his contract or term of office. Earlier in time than the expiration 
described in the preceding sentence, the Town Council, by affirmative vote 
of a two-thirds majority of the full board may vote to terminate, remove or 
suspend the Town Manager from office in accordance with the following 
procedure. Before the Town Manager may be removed, if he so demands, he 
shall be given a written statement of the reasons alleged for his removal and 
shall have a right to be heard thereon at a meeting of the Town Council prior 
to the final vote on the question of his removal, but pending and during such 
hearing the Town Council may suspend him from office. The action of the 
Town Council in suspending or removing the Town Manager shall be final, it 
being the intention of this section to vest all authority and to fix all 
responsibility for such suspension or removal in the Town Council. The 
Town Manager shall continue to receive his salary until the effective date of 
a final vote of removal. The Town Council may, by ordinance, establish a 



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procedure governing the removal from office of a Town Manager in such 
detail as it may deem necessary or desirable. 

No contract of employment for a Town Manager shall be inconsistent with 
this section. 

§ 61-5. Acting Town Manager. 

A. Temporary Absence - The Town Manager shall, by letter filed with 
the Town Council and a copy filed with the Town Clerk, designate a 
qualified Town officer or administrative employee to exercise the powers 
and perform the duties of his office during a temporary absence. During 
the first 10 working days of a temporary absence of the Town Manager, 
the Town Council may revoke such designation by a two-thirds vote and, 
after the expiration of 10 working days, by a majority vote, whereupon it 
may appoint another qualified Town officer or employee to serve as 
acting Town Manager until the Town Manager shall return and resume 
his duties. 

B. Vacancy - Any vacancy in the office of Town Manager shall be 
filled as soon as possible by the Town Council but pending such 
appointment, the Town Council shall designate a qualified Town officer 
or administrative employee to exercise the powers and perform the duties 
of the Town Manager on an acting basis. The appointment of an acting 
Town Manager shall be for a term not to exceed 4 months; provided, 
however, 1 renewal, not to exceed a second 4 months, may be permitted. 

C. Powers and Duties - The powers of a temporary or acting Town 
Manager shall be limited to matters not admitting of delay; provided, 
however, that no temporary Town Manager acting under subsection (a) 
shall have authority to make any permanent appointment to, or removal 
from, any office or position under the Town. 

§ 61-6. Evaluation. 

There shall be an annual review of the Town Manager's job performance 
conducted by Town Council. 

[HISTORY: Change of Government from Board of Selectmen to Town 
Manager adopted at Annual Town Meeting on December 16, 2008. Effective 
as of Special Town Election on September 15, 2009.] 

Chapter 68 
WATER COMMISSIONERS 

§ 68-1. Powers and duties. § 68-3. Representation- Joint Water Board. 

§ 68-2. Representation- Tri-Town 
Water Commissioners. 

[HISTORY; Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



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GENERAL REFERENCES 
WATER - See Ch. 192. 

§ 68-L Powers and duties. 

The Town Council shall be the agents and attorneys of the Town to 
prosecute, defend, compromise and settle any and all suits and proceedings in 
which the Town may be interested, as a party or otherwise, so far as the same 
in any manner relates to the preserving, taking and use of the water of Great 
Pond or to the construction of the waterworks, either jointly or separately, as 
authorized under Chapter 217 of the Acts of 1885, and to employ counsel, if 
necessary. 

§ 68-2. Representation- Tri-Town Water Commissioners. 

The Town Council shall appoint one of its members or its designee to serve 
as the Town's representative to the Tri-Town Water Commissioners. 
§ 68-3. Representation- Joint Water Board. 

The Town Council shall appoint one of its members or its designee to serve 
as the Town's representative to the Joint Water Board. 



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PART II 
GENERAL LEGISLATION 



Chapter 73 
ALARM SYSTEMS 

ARTICLE I POLICE DEPARTMENT 

§ 73-1. Automatic dialing devices. 
§ 73-2. Direct connections to Police Department. 
§ 73-3. Control and curtailment of signals 
emitted by alarm systems. 
§ 73-4. Testing of equipment. 
§ 73-5. Violations and penalties. 
§ 73-6. Release required. 
ARTICLE II FIRE DEPARTMENT 
§ 73-7. Definitions. 

§ 73-8. Connection by way of master box. 



§ 73-9. Connection of central station operating 
companies. 

§ 73-10. Updating information. 

§ 73-11. Fire alarm system malfunctions, fines. 

§ 73-12. Appeal procedure. 

§ 73-13. Regulations and enforcement. 

§ 73-14. Disposition of fines. 

§ 73-15. Severability. 

ARTICLE III KEY BOXES 

§ 73-16. Key box required; exceptions. 

§ 73-17. Violations and penalties. 



[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable. 

ARTICLE I 
Police Department 
§ 73-1. Automatic dialing devices. 

A. No automatic dialing device shall be interconnected to any telephone 
numbers at the police station, unless approved by the Police Department 
prior to installation, after the effective date of this article. 

B. Within six months after the effective date of this article, all 
automatic dialing devices interconnected to any number at the police 
station shall be disconnected there from, with the exception of telephone 
dialers approved by the Police Department. The user of each device shall 
be responsible for having the device disconnected or approved by the 
Police Department. 

C. Approval of dialers by Police Department. To obtain approval of a 
telephone alarm dialer, the owner of the dialer alarm must certify to the 
Police Department that the dialer will disconnect from the phone lines 
automatically after the third call is made to the Police Department. 

§ 73-2. Direct connections to Police Department. 

A. Alarm systems may be connected to the alarm console in the police 
station by interfacing through the one company maintaining the alarm 
console at the police station. 

B. The alarm user or alarm business contracting for servicing the alarm 
user's alarm system shall be responsible for obtaining the required leased 
telephone lines between the alarm user's premises and the alarm- 
receiving equipment at the Police Department and for furnishing the 



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appropriate interface equipment, if required, to be compatible with the 
receiving equipment used to operate the alarm console. 
§ 73-3. Control and curtailment of signals emitted by alarm systems. 

A. Every alarm user shall submit to the Police Chief the names and 
telephone numbers of at least two persons, in addition to the alarm user, 
who can be reached at any time, day or night, and who are authorized to 
respond to an emergency signal transmitted by an alarm system, and who 
can open the premises wherein the alarm system is installed. 

B. All alarm systems shall be equipped with a test device which will 
give a ten-second delay prior to alarm system activation in order to warn 
the alarm user of an open circuit. 

C. Within six months from the effective date of this article, all alarm 
systems which use an audible horn, siren or bell shall be equipped with a 
device which will shut off such horn, siren or bell within 30 minutes after 
activation of the alarm system. 

D. Each alarm system user, to include also all automatic devices 
interconnected to any number at the police station, shall be allowed, in 
the course of any consecutive twelve-month period; three free false 
alarms. False alarms in excess of three shall be assessed a fme in 
accordance with the Fine Schedule. 

§ 73-4. Testing of equipment. 

No alarm system connected to the Police Department shall be tested, worked 
on or demonstrated without first obtaining permission from the Police 
Department. 

§ 73-5. Violations and penalties. 

Any alarm user who violates the provisions of this article shall be subject to a 
fme in accordance with the Fine Schedule and subsequent to the third offense 
in a twelve-month period, may be ordered by the Chief of Police to 
disconnect from the alarm system totally. 
§ 73-6. Release required. 

Any person making application for interconnection of an alarm security 
system to the Randolph Police Station shall, prior to said connection being 
made, execute a release running to the Randolph Police and the Town of 
Randolph. 

ARTICLE II 
Fire Department 

§ 73-7. Definitions. 

When used in this article, unless a contrary intention clearly appears, the 
following words shall have the meanings indicated: 

ALARM ACTUATING - Any device, such as smoke or heat detector, pull 
station or sprinkler flow switch, that causes the alarm to sound. 



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AUTOMATIC DEVICE - A fire protection device that requires no manual 
operation during activation. 

CENTRAL STATION OPERATING COMPANY - A company equipped to 
receive a fire alarm signal from each of its customers and which then 
transmits to the RED the location of any such alarm which the "central 
station operating company" receives. 

FALSE ALARM = A "false alarni" shall be defined as any and/or all of the 
following: 

A. The activation of an alarm system through mechanical failure, 
malfunction, improper installation or negligence of the user of an alarm 
system or his/her employees or agents. 

B. Any signal or automatic dialing service transmitted to the RED 
requesting or requiring or resulting in a response on the part of the RED 
when a situation requiring response by the RED does not in fact exist. 

C. For the purposes of this section, a "false fire alarm" shall be defined 
to include any and/or all of the following: 

(1) The operation of a faulty smoke- or heat-detection device. 

(2) Faulty control panel or associated equipment. 

(3) A water pressure surge in automatic sprinkler equipment. 

(4) Accidental operation of an automatic sprinkler system. 

(5) An action by an employee of the owner or occupant of the 
protected premises or a contractor employed by the owner or the 
occupant causing accidental activation of the internal fire alarm 
system. 

FIRE ALARM CONTROL PANEL - The electrical and electronic center of 
a system that detects alarm conditions, sounds signals and provides power 
and supervisory features. 

FIRE ALARM SERVICE COMPANY - A commercial firm that specializes 
primarily in the installation and service of fire alarm devices. 
FIRE ALARM SYSTEM - Any heat-activated, smoke-activated, flame- 
energy-activated or other such automatic device capable of transmitting a fire 
alarm signal to either a central station operating company or directly to the 
RED by way of a master box. 

FIRE ALARM SYSTEM OWNER - An individual or entity who or which 
owns the title to and/or has on his/her or its business or residential premises a 
fire alarm system equipped to send a fire alarm signal to a central station 
operating company or directly to the RFD by way of a master box. 
FIRE CHIEF - The Chief of the RFD. 

FIRE WATCH - A Randolph fire fighter having knowledge of fire safety 
rules and regulations and having the ability and knowledge to properly sound 
an alarm and one who tours the property being protected in the event of fire. 
MANUAL DEVICE - A fire alarm pull station or other device that requires 
manual activation for operation. 



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MASTER BOX OWNER - An individual or entity who or which has, on 
his/her or its business or residential premises, a fire alarm system equipped to 
send a fire alarm signal directly to the RFD by way of a master box. 
RED - The Randolph Fire Department. 

SERVICE INDIVIDUAL - An individual having extensive knowledge in the 
repair and maintenance of fire alarm systems, such as an electrician who 
specializes in signaling systems. 

SIGNALING CIRCUIT - The electrical circuit that connects and operates all 
fire alarm system horns, bells or other devices. 

SINGLE STATION UNIT - A self-contained fire protection device equipped 
with all features of a system within a small housing, such as a battery- 
operated smoke detector (i.e., detector, power supply, signal). 
SUPERVISORY CIRCUIT - Any alarm circuit that passes a small current 
through a device and detects a fault on that circuit. 

TYPE I SYSTEM - A total fire alarm system that includes detecting devices, 
annunciator signals, power supply and control panel that sounds the local 
signals at the structure being protected and trips a master fire alarm box 
connected to the RFD. 

TYPE II SYSTEM - Same as a Type I system, except that there is no direct 

connection to the Fire Department. 

§ 73-8. Connection by way of master box. 

A. Every master box owner whose fire alarm system on the effective 
date of this article is connected to the RFD by way of a master box shall 
pay the fees as set forth in accordance with the Fee Schedule. 

B. Every master box owner whose fire alarm system is connected after 
the effective date of this article to the RFD by way of a master box shall 
pay the fees as set forth in accordance with the Fee Schedule. 

C. Before any fire alarm system is connected to the RFD, the master 
box owner shall provide the Fire Chief with the following information: 

(1) The name, address, home and work telephone number of the 
master box owner. 

(2) The street address where the master box is located. 

(3) The names, addresses and telephone numbers of the persons or 
businesses protected by the fire alarm system connected to the 
master box. 

(4) The names, addresses and home and work telephone numbers of 
at least two persons other than the owner who can be contacted 24 
hours a day who are authorized by the master box owner to respond 
to an alarm signal and who have access to the premises in which the 
master box is located. 

(5) Such other information as the Fire Chief may require. 

D. If, at the passage of this article, a fire alarm system has already been 
connected to the RFD by way of a master box, the master box owner 



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shall comply with the requirements of this section within 60 days after 
the RED has sent him or her notice, by first-class mail, of the 
requirements of this section. 

E. If a master box owner fails to comply with this section, the Fire 
Chief may assess a fme in accordance with the Fine Schedule for each 
day of noncompliance. 
§ 73-9. Connection of central station operating companies. 

A. Every central station operating company which has a direct 
connection on the effective date of this article to the RED shall pay the 
fees as set forth in accordance with the Fee Schedule. 

B. Every central station operating company which makes a direct 
connection after the effective date of this article to the RED shall pay the 
fees as set forth in accordance with the Fee Schedule. 

C. Before any central station operating company is connected with the 
RED, it shall provide the Fire Chief with the following information: 

(1) The name, address and telephone numbers of the central station 
operating company. 

(2) The names, addresses and home and work telephone numbers of 
at least two persons who can be contacted 24 hours a day who are 
authorized by the central station operating company to respond to an 
alarm signal and who have access to the premises from where the 
alarm signal is emitting to the central station operating company. 

(3) The name, address, home and work telephone numbers and 
location of the premises of each customer of the central station 
operating company who has a fire alarm system equipped to send a 
fire alarm signal to the central station operating company. 

(4) Such other information as the Fire Chief may require. 

D. If at the passage of this article a central station operating company 
already has a direct connection to the RED, the central station operating 
company shall comply with the requirements of this section within 60 
days after the RFD has sent it notice, by first class mail, of the 
requirements of this section. 

E. If a central station operating company fails to comply with this 
section, the Fire Chief may assess a fine of in accordance with the Fine 
Schedule for each day of noncompliance. 

§ 73-10. Updating information. 

A. Every master box owner and every central station operating company 
shall be responsible for updating the information herein required to be 
provided to the Chief If the information provided changes, the master 
box owner and the central station operating company shall provide the 
Fire Chief with the updated information and shall pay the fee, if any, 
required by this article. 



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B. If a master box owner or a central station operating company fails to 
comply with this section, the Fire Chief may assess a fme in accordance 
with the Fine Schedule. 
§ 73-11. Fire alarm system false alarms, fines. 

A. If there is a fire alarm system false alarms, as defined herein, the Fire 
Chief may assess a fine against a fire alarm system owner for each false 
alarnis per fiscal year in accordance with the Fine Schedule. 

(1) First offense: no charge. 

(2) Second and third offense. Upon the recording of the second and 
third offense by the RED, the Fire Chief shall notify the owner of the 
building, in writing, by certified mail, of such fact and at this time 
inform the owner of the Department's policy with regard to charging 
for false alarms. (A copy of the poUcy shall be sent at this time.) 

(3) Fourth through sixth offense: in accordance with the Fine 
Schedule. 

(4) Seventh through 1 1th offense: in accordance with the Fine 
Schedule. 

(5) Each offense after the 1 1th: in accordance with the Fine Schedule. 

B. Private fire alarm systems connected to the RED by other automatic 
means or through a central station system shall be subject to the above 
conditions. 

C. Any false fire alarm which is the result of the failure of the property 
owner, occupant or his/her agents to notify the RED of repair, 
maintenance or testing of the internal fire alarm system within the 
protected premises shall cause a penalty to be assessed in accordance 
with Subsection A. 

D. Property owners will be billed once a month for the previous month's 
malfunction activity. 

E. If the bill is not paid within thirty (30) calendar days, a second notice 
will be sent. If the bill is not paid after another thirty (30) calendar-day 
period, a final notice will be sent infonning the owner and/or occupant 
that the master box will be disconnected and the insurance company 
notified. 

§ 73-12. Appeal procedure. 

Any fire alarm system owner who is aggrieved by an action taken by the Fire 
Chief under this article may, within 10 days of such action, file an appeal, in 
writing, to the Town Manager of the Town of Randolph. After notice, the 
Manager shall hold a hearing, after which he shall issue a decision in which 
he affirms, annuls or modifies the action taken by the Fire Chief, giving his 
reasons therefore. The Manager shall send its decision to the owner by first- 
class mail within 10 days after the hearing. The decision of the Manager shall 
be a final administrative decision. The owner shall have 30 days from the 



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date of the written decision to seek judicial review in the Norfolk County 
Superior Court. 

§ 73-13. Regulations and enforcement. 

The Fire Chief may promulgate such regulations as may be necessary to 
implement this article. The Fire Chief is authorized to pursue such legal 
action as may be necessary to enforce this article. 
§ 73-14. Disposition of fines. 

All fines assessed herein shall be payable to the Town of Randolph Fire 
Department for deposit in the general fund. 
§ 73-15. Severability. 

The provisions of this article shall be deemed to be severable, and if any of 
its provisions shall be held unconstitutional by any court of competent 
jurisdiction, the decision of such court shall not affect or impair any of the 
remaining provisions. 

ARTICLE III 
Key Boxes 
§ 73-16. Key box required; exceptions. 

Any building, other than a residential building of less than six units, which 
has a fire alarm system or other fire protective system, shall provide a secure 
key box, installed in a location accessible to the Fire Department in case of 
emergency. This key box shall contain keys to fire alarm control panels and 
other keys necessary to operate or service fire protection systems. The key 
box shall be a type approved by the Chief of the Randolph Fire Department 
and shall be located and installed as approved by the Chief or his designee. 
§ 73-17. Violations and penalties. 

Any building owner violating this article, after receiving due notice by the 
Fire Department, shall be subject to a fine in accordance with the Fine 
Schedule. 

Unpaid fines shall be a lien on the owner's property. 

Chapter 76 
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 

§ 76-1. Prohibited acts. § 76-3. Enforcement. 

§ 76-2. Evidence of violation. § 76-4. Violations and penalties. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 76-1. Prohibited acts. 

No person shall drink any alcoholic beverages, as defined in M.G.L c. 138, § 
1 , while on, in or upon any public way or any way in which the public has a 
right of access, any place to which members of the public have access as 
invitees or licensees, any park or playground or any private land or place 
without consent of the owner or person in control thereof 



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§ 76-2. Evidence of violation. 

Possession of an open can, bottle or other container which, upon analysis by 
a member of the Police Department, is determined to contain an alcoholic 
beverage, as defined in M.G.L c. 138, § 1, shall be prima facie evidence of 
drinking said alcoholic beverage. 
§ 76-3. Enforcement. 

A. A police officer may, without a warrant, arrest anyone who violates 
this chapter. 

B. All alcoholic beverages being used in violation of this chapter shall 
be seized and safely held until adjudication of the charge against the 
person or persons arrested or summoned before the court, at which time 
they shall be returned to the person entitled to lawfiil possession. 

§ 76-4. Violations and penalties. 

Violation of this chapter will result in a fine in accordance with the fine 
schedule, for the offender. 



[HISTORY: Adopted 5-15-2007 ATM by Art. 9, approved. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 79-1. Authority. 

This chapter is adopted pursuant to the authority granted the Town by virtue 
of M.G.L c. 140, §147A. 
§ 79-2. Town responsibility. 

A. Upon the effective date of this chapter, the Town of Randolph shall 
assume all responsibility for regulation of dogs within the jurisdiction of 
the Town and shall be responsible for the costs and expenses relating 
thereto. All money received from licenses or recovered as fines under 
this chapter shall be paid into the treasury of the Town and shall not 
hereafter be paid over by the Town Treasurer to the County of Norfolk. 

B. Town enforcement. Beginning upon the effective date of this 
chapter, the Town shall take over and assume responsibility for all dog 
control functions previously undertaken by the County of Norfolk Dog 
Control Program within the limits of the Town and shall be responsible 
for administering all laws, rules and regulations applicable to dogs within 
the Town. 



Chapter 79 
ANIMALS 



§ 79-1. Authority. 

§ 79-2. Town responsibility. 

§ 79-5. Violations and penalties; enforcement. 

§ 79-6. Nature of licenses. 



§ 79-7. Vicious dogs. 

§ 79-8. Unleashed/Abandoned dogs. 

§ 79-9. Nature of licenses. 

§ 79-10. Repealer. 



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§ 79-3. Animal Control Officer; enforcement. 

The provisions of this chapter shall be administered and enforced by the 
Animal Control Officer; provided, however, that except as otherwise 
specifically set forth in this chapter for the disposition of funds collected, this 
chapter shall not change the duties or responsibilities of the Town or of any 
Town official or employee as described in the Massachusetts General Laws 
applicable to the regulation of dogs. 
§ 79-4. Regulations. 

A. Definitions. As used in this chapter, the following words and phrases 
shall have the following meanings: 

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER - Any officer or assistant officer appointed 
pursuant to this Chapter for the enforcement of animal control laws, and who 
shall be responsible for this Chapter. 

ATTACK - Conduct by a dog directed at a person or domestic animal 
consisting of biting or other act reasonably likely to cause injury or harm. 
This conduct shall include, but not be limited to, conduct by a dog if it is 
restrained by a leash, fence or other means, and it is clear that only the 
presence of the leash, fence, or other means of restraint prevents the dog 
from causing injury or harm to a person or to a domestic animal. 
COMMERCIAL KENNEL - A kennel maintained as a business for the 
boarding of dogs or cats, or for the grooming of dogs or cats. 
FANCIER KENNEL - A kennel maintained for a collection of seven or more 
dogs on a single premises or a kennel maintained for a collection of seven or 
more cats on a single premises. 

(1) Hobby Kennel - Canine. 

(2) Hobby Kennel - Feline. 

HOBBY KENNEL - A kennel maintained for a collection of four to six dogs 
on a single premises or a kennel maintained for a collection of four to six cats 
on a single premises. 

( 1 ) Hobby Kennel - Canine. 

(2) Hobby Kennel - Feline. 

KEEPER - Any person, corporation, or society, other than the owner, 
harboring, or having in his possession a dog or cat. 

KENNEL - Any single premises on which are kept a pack or collection of 

four or more dogs or cats over the age of three months. 

KENNEL LICENSE - A license for any type of kennel. 

LICENSE PERIOD - The time between January first and the following 

December 31st, both dates inclusive. 

OWNER - Includes corporations, societies, associations, partnerships, 
individuals and any persons or agencies or political subdivisions provided 
they show ownership of an animal by possession of a current and valid 
license or other satisfactory proof of ownership. 



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VICIOUS DOG - A dog which has been determined to be 'Vicious" pursuant 
to the provisions of this Chapter. 
B. Licenses and tags. 

(1) The owner or keeper of a dog within the Town shall cause the 
dog to be initially licensed within 30 days if greater than six months 
of age, or when it attains the age of six months, and annually 
thereafter. 

(2) The Town shall issue dog licenses and license tags. The Town 
shall state upon each license application the following description of 
the dog: name, age, sex, reproductive status, breed and color as well 
as the name, address, and telephone number of the owner, and the 
license registration number. 

(3) The schedule fees for such licenses and regulations shall be 
adopted by the Board of Selectman Town Manager after a public 
hearing. 

(4) Failure to pay the annual review license due by April 1st each 
year pursuant to this section shall result in a fme of $25 in 
accordance with the fme schedule in addition to the licensing fee 
required. 

(5) The Town shall not issue a license for any dog unless the owner 
or keeper provides the Town with a licensed veterinarian's certificate 
verifying that the dog is currently vaccinated against rabies, as 
required by section 79-4C below. 

(6) No fee shall be charged for licensing dogs specifically trained to 
lead or serve a blind, deaf or other handicapped person so long as 
such dog is so employed and a certificate of such training is 
presented to the Town. 

(7) Tags and licenses shall not be transferable. 

(8) The fee for a replacement tag shall be determined by the Board 
of Selectmen Town Manager after a public hearing. 

(9) No license shall be issued to any child under the age of 18. If a 
dog is owned or kept by a child under the age of 18, the license shall 
be issued in the name of the child's parent or legal guardian who 
shall be deemed the keeper of the animal for purposes of this 
Chapter. 

(10) A license fee shall not be refunded because of a subsequent 
death, loss, spaying, neutering, or removal from the Town of said 
dog.) The owner or keeper of a dog shall securely attach the license 
tag to said dog's collar or harness. If the tag is lost, the owner or 
keeper shall promptly apply for a replacement tag and shall attach 
same to the collar or harness of the dog. Failure to comply will result 
in a fine in the amount of $50 in accordance with the fine schedule. 



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C. Rabies vaccination. 

( 1 ) The owner or keeper of any dog or cat six months of age or older 
shall cause such dog or cat to be vaccinated against rabies by a 
licensed veterinarian using a vaccine approved by the Department of 
Public Health. 

(2) Upon request, the keeper/owner shall provide a rabies certificate 
which states the description of the dog or cat: name, age, sex, 
reproductive status, breed and color, as well as the name, address, 
and telephone number of the owner, in addition to the date of 
vaccination, product used and the duration of immunity. 

(3) Unvaccinated dogs or cats acquired or brought into the Town 
shall be vaccinated within 30 days after acquisition or entry into the 
Town or upon reaching the age of six months, whichever comes 
later. 

(4) Any exemption from the requirements of having to produce valid 
rabies certificate in order to obtain a dog license shall be granted if 
the owner or keeper presents a signed statement from a veterinarian, 
indicating that because of infirmity, other physical condition or 
regimen of therapy, inoculation is thereby deemed inadvisable. 

D. Kennel license. 

(1) Any owner or keeper of four or more dogs, or cats, three months 
or older, or who boards or grooms dogs or cats, shall apply to the 
Town Clerk's Office for the appropriate kennel license(s), in writing 
upon forms provided to the applicant by the Town. 

a) Each species (feline and canine) are counted individually 
when applying for a Hobby Kennel or a Fancier Kennel Permit. 
A single premise containing more than four cats or more than 
four dogs would need to apply for the appropriate permit(s) for 
each species. 

b) The application must be acted upon by the Town Clerk, or 
the Town Clerk's designee, within 30 days of its submission and 
date stamp by the Town Clerk's Office. 

c) The Animal Control officer may provide to the Town Clerk 
or the Town Clerk's designee such conditions or restrictions on 
the issuance of a kennel license as the Animal Control Officer 
deems necessary for the public good. This may include, but not 
limited to, a public hearing with notification of abutters, a 
maximum number of animals allowed by the license for Fancier 
and Commercial licenses. 

d) All approved applications must conform with all Randolph 
Zoning laws and Business license requirements of Randolph. 



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(2) The annual fees for kennel licenses and regulations shall be 
adopted by the Board of Selectmen Town Manager after a public 
hearing. 

(3) Failure to pay the annual renewal license fee due January 1st, by 
April 1st, shall resuh in a fine of $25 in accordance with the fine 
schedule. 

(4) In addition to the required kennel fee. 

(54)The Town shall issue, without charge, upon written approval of 
the Animal Control Officer, a kennel license to any domestic 
charitable corporation incorporated in the Commonwealth 
exclusively for the purpose of protecting animals from cruelty, 
neglect, or abuse. 

(65) A veterinary hospital shall not be considered a kennel unless it 
contains an area for the grooming or selling of dogs or cats, or for 
boarding of dogs or cats for other than medical or surgical purposes 
in which case it shall apply for a commercial kennel license. 
(76) If a kennel owner desires to increase the capacity of his kennel 
during a license period, he shall apply to the Town Clerk for a 
license modification, and upon approval by the Town Clerk or the 
Town Clerk's designee, the kennel owner shall pay only the increase 
in fee between the previous kennel fee and the new assessed kennel 
fee. Kennel licenses shall not be transferable. The owner or keeper of 
a kennel shall renew the license annually prior to the commencement 
of each succeeding license period. Failure to renew a kennel license 
shall result in a fine of $25 in accordance with the fine schedule in 
addition to the required kennel fee. 
E. Kennel inspection. 

(1) The Animal Control Officer, or his designee, may at any time 
inspect or cause to be inspected any kennel. If he/she believes after 
such inspection that the kennel is not being maintained in a sanitary 
and humane manner, or if the animals within such kennel constitute a 
public nuisance, the Animal Control officer may suspend such 
license and request a license revocation hearing to be held by the 
Board of Selectmen Town Manager within 30 days. 

(2) Upon re-inspection of any kennel with a suspended license, if the 
Animal Control Officer detennines the cause for suspension to be 
satisfactorily resolved, the Animal Control Officer shall make a 
report to the Board of Selectmen Town Manager and may rescind the 
temporary license suspension and re-instate such license. Any license 
once revoked may be reapplied for in the event of changed 
conditions. 

(3) If any person shall make a verbal complaint, to be followed in 
writing, to the Animal Control Officer that they are aggrieved, or 



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annoyed to any unreasonable extent, by one or more dogs at the 
kennel, because of excessive barking or vicious disposition of said 
dogs or other conditions connected with such kennel constituting a 
public nuisance, the Animal Control Officer, or his designee, shall 
investigate such complaint within seven days. 

(a) This investigation may include but not be limited to 
inspection of the kennel, imposing restrictions or conditions on 
such kennel, or requesting a hearing to be held by the Board of 
Selectmen Town Manager within 30 days. 

(b) Within seven days after such public hearing the Board of 
Selectmen Town Manager shall make an order either revoking, 
or suspending or modifying such kennel license or otherwise 
regulating said kennel, or dismissing said petition. 

(dc) Any person maintaining a kennel after the license therefore 
has been so revoked, or while such license is so suspended, may 
be punished by a fme of $50 in accordance with the fme 
schedule for each offense, 

(ed)The holder of such license may petition the District Court for 
rehef in accordance with M.G.L c. 140, § 137C. 

F. Injured or diseased animals. Whenever the Animal Control Officer 
determines that any animal has been injured sufficiently to require the 
services of a veterinarian and has transported such animal to the local 
veterinarian, a transportation charge in an amount to be set by the Board 
of Selectmen in accordance with the fee schedule pursuant to M.G.L. c. 
40, section 22F, shall be paid by the owner of the animal to the Town of 
Randolph. In addition, the owner shall be directly responsible for the 
charge for the services of the veterinarian. 

G. Animal pickups. A pickup fee proportional to the size of the animal 
but in an amount to be accordance with the fee schedule set by the Board 
of Selectmen Town Manager pursuant to M.G.L. c. 40, section 22F shall 
be paid by the property owner or in the case of a registered animal, by 
the owner of any said animal whenever the Animal Control Officer is 
required to enter upon private property to pick up the animal, dead or 
alive. 

H. Leash law. 

(1) No person owning or harboring a dog shall suffer or allow it to 
run at large in any of the streets or public ways or places or upon the 
premises of anyone other than the owner or keeper unless the owner 
or occupant of such premises grants permission. No dog shall be 
permitted in any public place or street within the Town of Randolph 
unless it is effectively restrained by a chain or leash not exceeding 
seven feet in length and attended by a person of adequate age and 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



discretion to properly control its actions. Violations of the foregoing 
shall be penalized in accordance with M.G.L c. 140, § 173. 

(2) If any person shall make a verbal complaint, to be followed in 
writing, to the Animal Control Officer that any dog owned or 
harbored within his/her jurisdiction is a nuisance by reason of 
vicious disposition or excessive barking, violation of personal 
property or other disturbance, the Animal Control Officer shall 
investigate such complaint, which may include an examination, 
under oath, of the complainant, and submit a written report to the 
Selectmen Town Manager of his/her findings and recommendations, 
together with the written complaint. 

(3) Upon receipt of such report and examination of the complainant 
under oath, the Selectmen Town Manager may make such order 
concerning the restraint, muzzling or disposal of such dog as may be 
deemed necessary. The Animal Control Officer, after investigation, 
may issue an interim order that such dog be restrained or muzzled for 
a period not to exceed 14 days to enable the Selectmen Town 
Manager to issue their order following receipt of the report of the 
Animal Control Officer. If the Selectmen Town Manager fail to act 
during the period of the interim order, upon expiration of the period 
the interim order automatically is vacated. 

(4) The animal control officer may issue an interim order against 
any dog for any of the following reasons: 

(a) For having bitten any person. 

(b) If found at large. 

I. Daytime repetitive barking. It shall be unlawftil for a dog owner, 
keeper, or kennel owner to allow a dog, or dogs, within the Town of 
Randolph to bark in the open, outside of any building, or to bark inside a 
building in such a manner as to be heard beyond the premises where the 
dog, or dogs, are quartered, repetitively for more than 30 minutes during 
the hours between 7:00 a.m. and 9:00 p.m. 

J. Nighttime repetitive barking. It shall be unlawftil for a dog owner, 
keeper, or kennel owner to allow a dog, or dogs, within the Town of 
Randolph to bark in the open, outside of any building, or to bark inside a 
building in such a manner as to be heard beyond the premises where the 
dog, or dogs, are quartered, repetitively for more than 10 minutes during 
the quiet hours between 9:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. 

K. The owner of any dog found by the Animal Control Officer or Police 
Department to be unleashed or unsecured and to have bitten or attacked a 
person or another domesticated animal shall be subject to the fines set 
forth in M.G.L. c. 140, section 173A. 

L. The keeper of any dog that has been quarantined for suspicion of 
rabies and fails to obey such order shall be subject to a fine of $50 in 



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accordance with the fine schedule for each offense, each day constituting 
a separate offense. 

M. Animal waste removal "pooper scooper." The owner or keeper of a 
dog shall cause to be removed any defecation made by said dog, at the 
time made, from any street, public way, public place or property of 
another. Failure to comply with this section shall result in a fine which 
shall be subject to a fine in accordance with the fine schedule, as follows: 
In keeping with the above, all persons who are walking said dog shall be 
required to possess the means of picking up, retrieving and disposing of 
said waste. 

(1) Written warning first offense in a 365 day period. 

(2) $25.00 second offense in a 365 day period. 

(3) $50.00 third or subsequent offense in a 365 day period. 

N. Fees to treasury. All money received from licenses or recovered as 
fines pursuant to this chapter shall be paid into the treasury of the Town, 
and no portion thereof shall be retained, withheld or paid back to any 
Town official or employee as compensation, nor shall said money be 
paid over to Norfolk County. 
§ 79-5. Violations and penalties; enforcement. 

A. Fine. Any violation of this chapter, except where otherwise 
specifically provided herein, shall be punished by a fine of $50 in 
accordance with the fine schedule. This chapter shall be enforced by the 
Animal Control Officer utilizing the non-criminal tickets and disposition 
mechanism of M.G.L c. 40, § 2 ID. 

B. Other remedies. Any violation of this chapter may be further remedied 
by the Board of Selectmen Town Manager, after hearing, issuing orders 
concerning the restraint, muzzling or disposal of dogs as may be deemed 
necessary in the same manner as authorized by M.G.L c. 140 § 157, or 
any other general law of the Commonwealth regulating dogs, here fully 
incorporated by reference as applicable to the dog regulations of this 

chapter. 

C. Leash law complaint. Whenever a complaint is sought in the District 
Court for violation of the so-called leash law, the procedure set forth in 
M.G.L c. 140, § 173 A, may be followed. 

§ 79-6. Nature of licenses. 

All licenses, tags and other permission from the Animal Control Officer or 
other Town office or official related to this Chapter 79 shall be construed as a 
privilege, conferring no property interest or other right, that may be revoked 
at any time by written notice. No license granted under this Chapter 79 shall 
be transferable or assignable. 
§ 79-7. Vicious dogs: 

A. Hearing by the Board of Selectmen Town Manager. 



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(1) The Board of Selectmen Town Manager at the request of the Animal 
Control Officer or upon the filing of a signed, written complaint with the 
Board of Selectmen Town Manager in accordance with M.G.L. c. 140, § 
157, shall hold a public hearing to determine whether the dog which is 
the subject of the request or complaint is "vicious." 

(2) A dog may be determined by the Board of Selectmen Town Manager 
to be "vicious" if any of the following conditions have been 
demonstrated: 

(a) The dog has attacked any person or domestic animal or has 
attempted to attack any person or domestic animal. 

(b) The dog has a known propensity, tendency or disposition to 
attack persons or domestic animals. 

(c) The dog acts in a highly aggressive manner when unprovoked 
within a fenced yard or enclosure and reasonably appears to the 
Animal Control Officer to be able to escape the area in which it is 
confined. Vocalization or barking, without more, shall not satisfy the 
requirement of this sub-section. 

(d) The dog, whether leashed or not, has approached any person in 
an apparent attitude of attack upon the streets, sidewalks, or any 
public grounds or places. 

(e) The dog is owned or harbored primarily for the purpose of dog 
fighting or has been trained for dog fighting or had been trained for 
the purpose and intent of protecting or promoting illegal activity as 
determined by the Randolph Police Department, Randolph Animal 
Control Officer, and/or other local, state, or federal law enforcement 
agencies. 

(3) No dog shall be determined to be "vicious" in the following 
circumstances: 

(a) At the time of the dog's conduct, the person attacked by the dog 
was committing criminal trespass or other tort upon premises 
occupied by the owner, keeper, or harborer of the dog; was teasing, 
tormenting, abusing, provoking, or assaulting the dog; or was 
committing or attempting to commit a crime. 

(b) At the time of the dog's conduct, the domestic animal attacked 
by the dog was attacking the dog. 

(c) At the time the dog attacked a domestic animal, the dog was 
working as a hunting dog, herding dog or predator control dog on the 
property of or under the control of its owner, harborer, or keeper and 
the injury was to a species or type of domestic animal appropriate to 
the work of the dog. 

(d) At the time of the dog's conduct it was protecting or defending a 
person within the immediate vicinity of the dog from an attack or 
assauk by another person or animal. 



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(e) At the time of the dog's conduct it was performing duties as a 
military, correctional or police-owned dog and its conduct was such 
as is reasonably contemplated by those duties. 

(f) At the time of the dog's conduct it was reacting to pain or injury, 
or was protecting itself, its kennel, or its offspring. 

B. Duties of board of selectmen when dog is determined "Vicious." 

(1) When the Board of Selectmen Town Manager determines that a dog 
is "vicious" after hearing, the Board of Selectmen Town Manager shall 
order the following: 

(a) Spaying or neutering, if the dog is not already altered; provided, 
however, that no such order shall issue if a licensed veterinarian 
certifies in a written statement that the dog is unfit for alteration 
because of a medical condition. 

(b) Positive identification of the dog as "vicious." The preferred 
means of positive identification shall be microchip identification, but 
a permanent tattoo approved by the Animal Control Officer is 
acceptable. 

(c) Behavior evaluation from a Certified Veterinary Behaviorist, as 
determined by the Animal Control Officer; and 

(d) Rabies vaccination as required by M.G.L. c. 140 § 145B, if the 
dog is not current on its annual vaccinations. Vaccination shall be 
ordered unless a licensed veterinarian certifies in writing that the 
dog's vaccination is current in accordance with the requirements of 
law. 

(2) When the Board of Selectmen Town Manager determines that 
additional protection for the public is necessary in addition to the 
measures set forth in sub-section (l)(a)-(d), above, the Board of 
Selectmen Town Manager may order any of the following additional 
measures: 

(a) A requirement that when the dog is removed from a secure area, 
such as indoor or outdoor confinement, the dog must be securely 
muzzled at all times. The muzzle must be approved by the Animal 
Control Officer so as not to interfere with normal breathing while at 
the same time it is effective to prevent the dog from biting. 

(b) Additional reasonable confinement measures, which may include 
additional fencing, enclosures or signage. 

(c) Limitations as to which person or persons are allowed to remove 
the dog from indoor or outdoor confinement. 

(d) Other actions which the Board of Selectmen Town Manager 
deems appropriate. These additional actions may include destruction 
of the dog by euthanasia if, based upon the evidence presented at the 
hearing, the Board of Selectmen finds in writing that the measures 
set forth in sub-section (l)(a)(d) and in sub-section (2)(a)-(c), above, 



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are not reasonably like'iy to prevent future injury to persons or to 
domestic animals. Such order shall comply with the provisions of 
M.G.L. c. 140, Section 157. 
(3) All costs involved regarding any orders of the Board of Selectmen 
Town Manager with regards to maintaining a vicious dog in the Town of 
Randolph shall be borne by the owner/keeper or harborer of said dog. 

C. Compliance. After a dog has been determined to be ''vicious," the 
Animal Control Officer shall maintain all records pertaining to that dog and 
shall take all steps necessary to ensure that the owner/keeper or harborer 
complies with all orders of the Board of Selectmen Town Manager pertaining 
to that dog. 

D. Confinement. 

( 1 ) Outdoor confinement. No person shall own, keep or harbor, or allow 
to be upon any premises occupied by him under his charge or control, 
any vicious dog unless the dog is confined behind a secure fence. The 
fence must be approved by the Animal Control Officer. Such dog may 
not be taken out of the secure enclosure unless the dog is leashed on a 
leash no longer than four feet in length. The dog must be under control of 
a responsible person 1 8 years of age or older. No such dogs are allowed 
on or within 500 feet of any parks, playgrounds, school yards or open 
space that is owned by the Town or other governmental entity, whether 
at large or under restraint. 

(2) Lidoor confinement. No vicious dog may be kept on a porch, patio, 
or in any part of a house or structure that would allow the dog to exit 
such building of its own volition, hi addition, no such dog may be kept in 
a house or structure where the windows are open or where screen 
windows or screen doors are the only obstacles preventing the dog from 
exiting the structure. 

E. Signs. All owners, keepers, or harborers of vicious dogs shall display in a 
prominent place on their premises a sign easily readable by the public, using 
the words "Beware of Dog." In addition, a similar sign is required to be 
posted by the kennel or pen of such dog. These signs must be easily read by a 
child and approved by the Animal Control Officer. 

F. Transfer/relocation. 

( 1 ) No vicious dog shall be given away, sold or bartered to any person or 
entity located within the Town of Randolph unless the new owner/keeper 
or harborer complies with the requirements imposed under this section. 

(2) Any owner, keeper or harborer of any vicious dog who is changing 
residence or location within the Town of Randolph must immediately 
notify the Animal Control Officer. The owner, keeper or harborer of any 
dog which has been determined to have met criteria similar to those set 
forth in this section for "vicious" dogs in any other city. Town or county 
who is relocating to the Town of Randolph for more than 10 (2)days 



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must immediately notify the Animal Control Officer. Any owner, keeper 
or harborer of any vicious dog who is relocating to another city, Town or 
county shall immediately notify the Animal Control Officer, or person 
performing similar duties, in that city. Town or county that the dog has 
been determined "vicious" by the Board of Selectmen Town Manager. 

G. Licensing surcharge. The annual licensing fee for a vicious dog shall 
include a $50 keep in accordance with the fee schedule surcharge in addition 
to the regular licensing fee. The surcharge required by this provision shall be 
enforced by the Animal Control Officer. 

H. Enforcement. 

(1) If 30 days expire following receipt by the owner/keeper or harborer 
of written notification that the dog has been determined to be "vicious," 
an owner/keeper or harborer who is not in compliance with any of the 
provisions of this section shall be subject to a fine of $100 in accordance 
with the fine schedule each day that the owner is not in compliance with 
any provision shall constitute a separate offense. 

(2) If any vicious dog is found running at large or is in violation of the 
provisions of this section, it shall immediately be impounded by the 
Animal Control Officer. Upon required notice, a hearing shall be held by 
the Board of Selectmen, Town Manager following which the Board of 
Selectmen Town Manager shall determine what measures are necessary 
to reasonably protect the public safety, including destruction of the dog 
by euthanasia. 

§ 79-8. Unleashed/Abandoned Dogs 

Any dog found running at large shall be impounded by the Animal Control 
Officer. The impoundment fee shall be borne by the owner/keeper or 
harborer whether or not such dog is reclaimed. If such dog is not reclaimed 
within 1 days of such impoundment, the animal may be disposed of by 
adoption or by euthanasia, which determination shall be made by the Animal 
Control Officer, 
§ 79-9. Nature of licenses. 

All licenses, tags and other permission from the Animal Control Officer or 
other Town office or official related to this Chapter 79 shall be construed as a 
privilege, conferring no property interest or other right, that may be revoked 
at any time by written notice. No license granted under this Chapter 79 shall 
be transferable or assignable. 
§ 79-10. Repealer. 

This chapter supersedes and replaces Article Seven, Section 21 (ATM 3-18- 
1974), Section 21A (ATM 3-20-1972), Sections 21B and 21C (STM 2-22- 
1993) and Section 21C (ATM 6-21-1993). This chapter supersedes and 
replaces above. (ATM 4-25-2006, Art. 1 1 - approved 10-17-2006) 



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Chapter 83 
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

§ 83-1. Reserved. § 83-3. Excavation and trench safety. 

§ 83-2. Regulating the security and maintenance of 
Abandoned and/or dilapidated buildings. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 12-2-2008 STM by Art. 8, approved.] 

§ 83-1. Reserved [Building construction in the Town of Randolph is 
governed by the current edition of the Massachusetts State Building 
Code.] 

§ 83-2. Regulating the security and maintenance of Abandoned and/or 
dilapidated buildings. 

A. Purpose. 

(1) Abandoned and/or Dilapidated Buildings encourage blighted and 
unsecured properties; cause the surrounding neighborhood to suffer 
from stagnant or declining real estate values; and create significant 
maintenance and monitoring costs to the Town of Randolph. 

(2) Accordingly, it is the intent of this section to protect public 
health, public safety, security, general welfare and quiet enjoyment 
of occupants, abutters, and neighborhoods by requiring the 
registration of all Abandoned and/or Dilapidated Buildings, as 
defined herein, and, by doing so, expedite the prompt rehabilitation 
and permanent occupancy of such buildings. 

B. Definitions. 

ABANDONED AND/OR DILAPIDATED BUILDING. Any residential, 
commercial or industrial building and/or premises, where the Owner, by his 
or her action or inaction, has failed to correct a material health and/or safety 
condition at the building or premises or on the surrounding Property. A 
material health and/or safety condition may be found where the health, safety 
and welfare of the neighborhood is or may be at risk, such as: 

(1) Where a building is vacant for a length of time that is inconsistent 
with its use as a residential, commercial or industrial building and/or 
premises (the state of being vacant is not necessarily to be considered a 
prerequisite to a finding of Abandonment and/or Dilapidation); or 

(2) Where there exists a lack of maintenance and/or a deterioration of a 
building or grounds which actually or potentially poses a risk to the 
public health, public safety, security, general welfare and quiet 
enjoyment of occupants, abutters, and neighborhoods; or 

(3) Where a building is not safe and/or structurally sound or where the 
building or its interior is otherwise unfit for healthy or safe habitation or 
access; or 



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(4) Where the structural vandalism of a building or grounds has gone 
unrepaired; or 

(5) Where a lack of maintenance or use and/or a deterioration of the 
building and/or premises promotes a degradation of the surrounding 
neighborhood affecting the public health, public safety, security, general 
welfare and quiet enjoyment of occupants, and abutters. 
ABANDONMENT. A building in the state of Abandonment is one 
which shows Evidence of Abandonment as defined below and is vacant 
or occupied by a person without a legal right of occupancy, and may be 
subject to a current Notice of Default and/or Notice of Trustee's Sale, 
pending Tax Assessors Lien Sale, and/or part of any real Property 
conveyed via a Foreclosure sale resulting in the acquisition of title by an 
interested beneficiary of a deed of trust, and/or part of any real Property 
conveyed via a deed in lieu of Foreclosure/sale. Indicia of Abandonment 
shall include without limitation no or inadequate response to requests 
from officials of the Town of Randolph for verification of ownership 
and/or to orders to repair to such Property for more than thirty (30) days 
after issuance of such requests and/or orders. 

CODE MANAGEMENT TASK FORCE. Pursuant to Chapter 61, Section 
61-9 of the General Ordinances, the Code Management Task Force 
("CMTF") coordinates the activities of various agencies involved in the 
enforcement of laws, ordinances, and regulations adopted to protect and 
promote the public health, public safety, security, general welfare and quiet 
enjoyment of the residents of the Town of Randolph. 

DILAPIDATED. A Dilapidated building is one which shows signs of decay, 
strewn trash, deterioration, or full or partial ruination through neglect or 
misuse. 

EVIDENCE OF ABANDONMENT. Any building and/or premise 
condition(s) that independently, or in the context of the totality of 
circumstances would lead a reasonable person to believe that a building is 
vacant or occupied by a person without a legal right of occupancy. Such 
conditions include but are not limited to: (1) overgrown grass (Ift or higher) 
or noticeable amounts of dead vegetation; (2) accumulation of unclaimed 
newspapers, circulars, flyers or mail; (3) past due utility notices or 
disconnected utilities; (4) accumulation of trash, junk or debris; (5) the 
absence of window coverings such as curtains, blinds or shutters; (6) the 
absence of furnishings or personal items consistent with residential 
habitation; (7) a swimming pool in such disrepair that a dangerous condition 
may exist; and/or (8) reports by neighbors, passersby, delivery agents, 
government employees that the building is vacant. 



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FORECLOSURE. The process by which Property, used as security for a real 
estate loan, is prepared for sale to satisfy the debt if the borrower defaults. 

NEIGHBORHOOD STANDARD. The condition of buildings and premises 
that prevails in and throughout the neighborhood where an Abandoned 
and/or Dilapidated Building is located. No Abandoned and/or Dilapidated 
Building shall be considered in determining this standard. 

OWNER. Every person, entity, service company, Property manager or 
realtor, who alone or severally with others: (1) has legal or equitable title to 
any building, dwelling, dwelling unit, mobile dwelling unit, or parcel of land, 
vacant or otherwise, including a mobile home park; or (2) has care, charge or 
control of any building, dwelling, dwelling unit, mobile dwelling unit, or 
parcel of land, vacant or otherwise, including a mobile home park, in any 
capacity including but not limited to agent, executor, executrix, 
administrator, administratrix, trustee or guardian of the estate; or (3) is a 
mortgagee in possession of a building and/or premises; or (4) is an agent, 
trustee, or other person appointed by the court and vested with possession or 
control of a building and/or premises; or (5) is an officer or trustee of the 
association of unit Owners of a condominium (each such person is bound to 
comply with the provisions of this ordinance as if he were the Owner); or (6) 
operates a rooming house; or (7) is a trustee who holds, owns, or controls 
mortgage loans or mortgage-backed securities transactions and has initiated 
Foreclosure. The Owner, as defined herein, may also be referred to as the 
"Responsible Person" in this chapter. 

PROPERTY. Any unimproved or improved real Property, or portion thereof, 
including but not limited to buildings or structures located on said Property, 
regardless of condition. 

THIS SECTION or ORDINANCE. Section 83-2 of Chapter 83 of the Town 
of Randolph's General ordinances, entitled, "REGULATING THE 
SECURITY AND MAINTENANCE OF ABANDONED AND/OR 
DILAPIDATED BUILDINGS WITHIN THE TOWN OF RANDOLPH." 

TOWN COUNCIL or COUNCIL- The Town Council for the Town of 
Randolph. 

C. Registration, Failure to Register, Change of Ownership. 

(1) Within forty-five (45) days of a building becoming Abandoned 
and/or Dilapidated, as determined by the CMTF pursuant to this Section, 
the Owner of such building shall register said building with the Police 



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Department, Building Department and Health Department by providing 
each department, on a form to be provided by such department, the 
name, address, telephone number of the Owner of the building, the street 
address of the building and the map, block and parcel number of such 
building. If the Owner does not reside in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, then the registration form shall also include the name, 
address and telephone number of a person who resides within the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and is authorized to accept service of 
process on behalf of the Owner and who shall be designated as the 
Owner's agent for purpose of receiving all notices issued pursuant to this 
Section. 

(2) Failure to register an Abandoned and/or Dilapidate Building shall be 
a violation of this Section. Each department, as referred to above, shall 
be immediately notified by the Owner of an Abandoned and/or 
Dilapidated Building if the ownership of said building changes 
subsequent to registration. 

D. Annual Registration Fee, Failure to Pay. 

( 1 ) On or before November 1 5th of each calendar year the Owner of any 
Abandoned and/or Dilapidated Building shall pay to the Town of 
Randolph an annual registration fee to cover the administrative cost of 
monitoring and ensuring the security and proper maintenance of such 
building. The annual registration fee shall be set by the Town Council 
pursuant to M.G.L c. 40, Section 22 F and listed in the fee schedule. 

(2) Failure to pay the annual registration fee shall be a violation of this 
Section, and the full fee shall be deemed an assessment resulting from a 
violation of this ordinance. Such fee, and any fines issued for violations 
of this Section, shall constitute a "municipal charges lien" on the 
Property to be collected in accordance with M.G.L. c. 40, Section 58. 

E. Security and Maintenance Requirements. 

The Owner, as that term is defined herein, shall secure buildings subject to 
registration pursuant to this Section in a such a manner as to prevent access 
by unauthorized persons, including but not limited to the following: (1) 
closing and locking of windows, doors (walk-through, sliding and garage), 
gates, swimming pools and any other opening of such size that it may allow a 
child to access the interior of the building; (2) re-glazing or boarding of any 
broken window; and (3) if directed to do so by the Town of Randolph, 
implement additional maintenance and/or security measures, including 
installing additional security lighting, increasing the frequency of on-site 



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inspections, employing an on-site security guard(s), disconnecting utilities 
and removing meter boxes, or implementing other measures as may be 
required to stop the structural decline of the Abandoned and/or Dilapidated 
Building and prevent unauthorized entry. 

F. Inspections and Posting. 

(1) If the Responsible Person is a corporation and/or out-of-area 
beneficiary/trustee/Owner, a local Property manager shall be hired to 
perform weekly inspections of the Abandoned and/or Dilapidated 
Building to verify that the requirements of this ordinance and any other 
applicable laws are being complied with. 

(2) The Abandoned and/or Dilapidated Building shall be posted with the 
name and 24-hour contact phone number of the local Property manager. 
The posting shall be no less than 18 inches by 24 inches and shall be 
legible from a distance of 45 feet. The posting shall contain the words: 

"THIS PROPERTY MANAGED BY [add name of Property manager]" and 
"TO REPORT PROBLEMS OR CONCERNS PLEASE CALL [add 24-hour 
contact phone number]" 

The posting shall be visible from the street and placed on the interior of a 
window of the Abandoned and/or Dilapidated Building that faces the main 
street or secured to the front exterior of the building facing the main street or, 
if no such area exists, on a stake of sufficient size to support the posting in a 
location that is visible from the main street but not readily accessible to 
vandals. Exterior posting must be constructed of, and printed with weather 
resistant materials. 

G. Billing Statement. 

On or before October 15th of each calendar year, the Town of Randolph shall 
send a billing statement, setting forth the required registration fee, to the 
Owner of the Abandoned and/or Dilapidated Building. The registration fee, 
as set by the Council pursuant to Subsection 83-2.040, shall be due and 
payable on November 1 5th of each year regardless of the delivery or receipt 
of such billing statement. 

H. Appeal. 

Any Owner aggrieved by the requirements of this Section may appeal such 
requirements and/or such fee in writing to the Town Manager no later that 



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fifteen (15) calendar days after the receipt of the billing statement. The 
appeal request must be accompanied by a non-refundable appeal cost to be 
set by the Council pursuant to M.G.L. c. 40, Section 22 F. Upon the proper 
filing of an appeal, payment of the registration fee shall be stayed pending 
the outcome of the appeal. If, upon appeal, the decision of the Manager is 
adverse to the Owner, the payment of the registration fee shall be due within 
ten (10) calendar days of such decision. 

I. Other Violations. 

The provisions of this Section are in addition to, and not in lieu of, any and 
all other applicable provisions of the General Ordinances of the Town of 
Randolph or any provisions of the Zoning Ordinances or any applicable 
regulations and laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and/or the 
Town of Randolph. 

J. Enforcement, Fine. 

A violation of this Section, either by failing to register an Abandoned and/or 
Dilapidated Building, failing to pay the registration fee or otherwise, shall be 
subject to a fine in accordance to the fine schedule per offense and each day 
that the violation is outstanding shall constitute a separate offense. The 
Health Agent and/or any Police Officer of the Town of Randolph or any 
official designee of the CMTF shall have the right to enforce this Section 
pursuant to the non-criminal disposition procedures set forth in Chapter 1, 
Section 1-6 of the Town of Randolph's ordinances. This Section shall not 
supersede, preempt or negate any individual department's statutory authority 
to act independently on such matters. 

K. Severability. 

If any provision of this Section is held to be invalid by a court of competent 
jurisdiction, then such provision shall be considered separately and apart 
from the remaining provisions, which shall remain in full force and effect. 

L. Notice. 

A copy of this ordinance shall be mailed by CMTF to all Owners of 
Abandoned and/or Dilapidated Buildings located in the Town of Randolph. 
The CMTF shall also mail a copy of this ordinance to all loan institutions, 
banks, real estate offices, and management companies located in and/or 
having legal or equitable interest in residential, commercial or industrial 
Property located in the Town of Randolph, to the extent that such 



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information is readily ascertainable and accessible from records on file with 
Town of Randolph or elsewhere. 

§ 83-3. Excavation and trench safety. 

A. Purpose. 

The purpose of this section is to establish reasonable standards to protect the 
safety of the citizens of the Town of Randolph from the hazards inherent in 
trenches and to provide for penalties for individuals who violate any 
provision of this ordinance. 

B. Authority, Fee. 

Pursuant to the provisions of M.G.L c. 82 A, the regulations of the 
Department of Public Safety in conjunction with the Division of 
Occupational Safety as promulgated under 520 CMR 14.00 regarding 
excavation and trench safety are expressly incorporated into this ordinance 
by reference. A reasonable fee to defray the cost of administration incurred in 
the review and processing of permits under this ordinance shall be 
established pursuant to M.G.L c. 40, s. 22F and c. 82A, s. 2. 

C. Permitting Authority. 

The Director of the Department of Public Works or his designee shall serve 
as the "Permitting Authority" for excavations to take place on both property 
that is owned or controlled by a public agency or that a public agency 
otherwise has a property interest in, including but not limited to an easement, 
and for excavations to take place on privately owned land. Designees of the 
Director of the Department of Public Works may include the Building 
Inspector and the Fire Chief or their respective designees. 

D. Fire Department Detail. 

In the event that the Permitting Authority becomes aware or is notified of an 
unattended trench during a time when the permit holder is unavailable, it may 
require a fire department detail to attend such unattended trench to protect 
the general public, the cost of which shall be assessed to the permit holder. 

E. Application. 

The provisions of this ordinance shall apply to any excavator in the Town of 
Randolph. 



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F. Violations. 

Any person violating this section shall be fined in accordance with the Fine 
Schedule for each offense, each day constituting a separate offense. The 
enforcing persons for this ordinance shall be the Permitting Authority or his 
designees and any one fire shift commander of the Town of Randolph. Non- 
criminal disposition of violations shall be available to apply to violations 
pursuant to Chapter 1, Section 1-6 of the Town of Randolph's General 
Ordinances. 

Chapter 86 
BUILDINGS, MOVING OF 

§ 86-L Procedure. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 Annual Town Meeting, Art. 8, approved 
10-27-1995. Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 86-1. Procedure. 

No person shall move a building from one lot to another lot without having 
followed this procedure: 

A. Obtain from the Building Commissioner and/or local inspector 
written permission to do so. 

B. Receive from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, all necessary 
permits. 

C. File with the Town Council a bond or other surety in the total 
amount determined by said Board to indemnify any or all persons. 

D. Receive from the Town Council permission to make said move 
during such hours and on such public ways as it may determine. 

E. Employ such security personnel, consisting of but not limited to 
police, fire, public works or others, as may be determined by the Town 
Council. 

Chapter 87 

DEMOLITION OF HISTORIC BUILDINGS 

§ 87-1. Purpose. § 87-5. Historic districts. 

§ 87-2. Definitions. § 87-6. Enforcement and remedy. 

§ 87-3. Procedure. § 87-7. Appeal procedure. 

§ 87-4. Emergency demolition. § 87-8. Severability. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-20-1999 ATM by Art. 8, approved 8-23-1999; as 
amended 6-17-2002 STM by Art. 2, approved 10-3-2002] 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



§ 87-1. Purpose. 

This ordinance is adopted for the purpose of preserving and protecting 
significant buildings within the Town of Randolph which reflect or constitute 
distinctive features of the cultural, architectural, economic, political or social 
history of the Town and to encourage the preservation and restoration rather 
than the demolition of such buildings. 
§ 87-2. Definitions. 

BUILDING - Any combination of materials forming a shelter for persons, 
animals, or property. 

BUILDING COMMISSIONER - The Randolph Building Commissioners. 
COMMISSION - The Randolph Historical Commission. 
DEMOLITION - Any act of pulling down, destroying, removing, or razing a 
building or any portion thereof, or commencing the work of total or 
substantial destruction with the intent of completing the same. 
DEMOLITION BY NEGLECT- a process of ongoing damage to the 
materials, viability and/or functionability of a building leading towards 
and/or causing its eventual demolition due to decay and/or structural failure 
and/or severe degradation over a period of time as a result of a general lack 
of maintenance, and/or failure to secure the building from pests or vandals, 
and/or failure to take reasonable measures to prevent the ingress of water, 
snow, ice, and wind through the roof, walls, or apertures. This definition to 
apply to buildings that meet one or more of the following criteria: Municipal 
Building; Listed as part of a Local Historic District, a National Register or 
National Register eligible property, or listed on a Form A or B in the 
Massachusetts Cultural Resource Inventory Survey (MAORIS). 
DEMOLITION PERMIT - The permit issued by the Building Commissioner 
as required by State Building Code, for the demolition or removal of a 
building or structure. This permit must also indicate the location of the 
facility at which the debris is to be disposed. 

SIGNIFICANT BUILDING - Any building or portion thereof which is 100 
years old or over and is not included in a historic district but which: 

A. Is listed on, or is within an area listed on, the National Register of 
Historic Places, or is the subject of a pending application for listing on 
said National Register; or 

B. Is included in the Cultural Resources Inventory prepared by the 
Commission including those buildings listed for which completed 
surveys may be pending; or 

C. Has been determined by a vote of the Commission to be historically 
or architecturally significant in terms of period, style, method of building 
construction, or association with a famous architect, builder, person or 
event provided that the owner of such a building and the Building 
Commissioner have been notified, in hand or by certified mail, within 10 
days of such vote. 



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§ 87-3. Procedure. 

A. Prior to application for a demolition permit of any building in the 
Town that is 100 years old or older, applicant should apply to the 
Historical Commission for a determination of whether such building is a 
Significant Building. A list of 100 years old or older buildings shall be 
maintained at the offices of both the Building Commissioner and the 
Historical Commission. No demolition permit shall be issued for such a 
property without the determination specified herein, except as noted 
below. 

B. After the Commission has received a copy of the application for a 
determination of historical significance, it shall within 20 days submit a 
preliminary recommendation regarding the granting of a demolition 
permit. If the commission issues a recommendation in favor of granting 
such a permit, an application may be filed with the Building 
Commissioner for the granting of such a permit, no permit shall be 
issued until a more thorough investigation and a public hearing is 
undertaken and a final recommendation is made by the Commission. 
Such investigation, public hearing and recommendation shall be 
completed within 45 days of the original submission to the Commission. 

C. After the Commission issues a preliminary recommendation in 
opposition to the granting of a permit for demolition, the Commission 
shall fix a time for the hearing no more than 30 days from the issuance of 
the preliminary recommendation and shall give public notice thereof by 
publishing notice of the time, place, and purpose of the hearing, in a local 
newspaper at least 14 days before said hearing, and also, within seven 
days of said hearing, by mailing a copy of said notice to the applicant, to 
the owners of all property within a three-hundred-foot radius of subject 
property as they appear on the most recent local tax list and to other such 
persons as the Commission shall deem entitled to notice. 

D. If, after such hearing, the Commission determines that the demolition 
of the Significant Building would not be detrimental to the historical 
heritage or resources of the Town, the Commission shall so notify the 
Building Commissioner with 10 days of such determination. Upon 
receipt of such notification, or after the expiration of 15 days from the 
date of the conduct of the public hearing if notification from the 
Commission has not been received, the Building Commissioner may, 
subject to the requirements of the State Building Code and any other 
applicable law, ordinances, rules and regulations, issue the demolition 
permit, 

E. If the Commission determines that the Significant Building would be 
detrimental to the historical heritage or resources of the Town, such 
building shall be considered a "preferably-preserved significant 
building." 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



F. Upon determination by the Commission that the Significant Building 
which is the subject of the application for a demolition permit is a 
preferably-preserved significant building, the Commission shall so 
advise the applicant and the Building Commissioner, and no demolition 
permit may be issued for at least six months after the date of such 
determination by the Commission. 

G. Notwithstanding Subsection F preceding, the Building 
Commissioner may issue a demolition permit for a preferably-preserved 
significant building at any time after receipt of written advice from the 
Commission to the affect that either: 

(1) The Commission is satisfied that there is no reasonable 
likelihood that either the owner or some other person or group is 
willing to purchase for fair market value, to preserve, rehabilitate, or 
restore such building, or 

(2) The Commission is satisfied that for at least six months the 
owner has made continuing, bona fide and reasonable efforts to 
locate a purchaser to preserve, rehabilitate and restore the subject 
building, and that such efforts have been unsuccessful. 

§ 87-4. Emergency demolition. 

A. If the Commission determines that a vacant building appears to 
suffer from deterioration and meets the definition of "demolition by 
neglecf stated in Subsection 87-2.5, the Commission shall so notify the 
owner of the property by certified mail. 

B. The property owner shall have 30 days to respond in writing to the 
Commission and submit a plan for securing the building from ftirther risk 
of loss or damage. 

C. Upon submission of the plan for securing the building, the owner 
shall perform the actions described in the plan no later than 30 days after 
submission of the plan, with completion to be within a reasonable time to 
be determined by the Commission and the owner. 

D. If the property owner fails to carry out the plan described in §87-4.3 
above, the Commission shall deem the building to be at risk of 
demolition by neglect and shall refer the violation to the Code 
Management Task Force for further action. 

E. Failure to respond to the Commission's notification shall result in the 
property being referred to the Town's Code Management Task Force for 
ftirther action. 

§ 87-5. Historic districts. 

Notwithstanding the foregoing sections of this Chapter 87, these provisions 
shall not apply to any building or structure located within a local historic 
district and subject to regulation under the provisions of M.G. L c. 40C and 
any ordinances regulating historic districts in the Town of Randolph. 



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§ 87-6. Enforcement and remedy. 

A. The Commission and Building Commissioner are each authorized to 
institute any and all proceedings in law or equity as they deem necessary 
and appropriate to obtain compliance with the requirements of this 
ordinance, or to prevent the violation thereof. 

B. Whoever violates any provisions of this ordinance shall be 
punishable by a fme in accordance with the fme schedule for each such 
violation. Each day during which a violation exists shall constitute a 
separate offense. 

C. No building permit shall be issued with respect to any premises upon 
which a Significant Building has been voluntarily demolished in 
violation of this ordinance for a period of three years after the date of 
completion of such demolition. As used herein, "premises" includes the 
parcel of land upon which the demolished significant building was 
located. 

D. The provisions of sub-section B above shall not apply to those 
buildings or structures that were demolished due to fire, storm or other 
natural disaster, provided that said fire damage was not the result of 
arson or other intentional destruction by the owner as determined by the 
Fire Chief or his designee or State Fire Marshal. 

§ 87-7. Appeal procedure. 

Any person aggrieved by the determination of the Commission, may within 
20 days after the filing of the notice of such determination with the Building 
Commissioner, appeal to the Superior Court for Norfolk County. 
§ 87-8. Severability. 

If any section, paragraph, or part of this ordinance is for any reason declared 
invalid or unconstitutional by any court, every other section, paragraph and 
part shall continue in full force and effect. 

Chapter 90 
BURNING, OUTDOOR 
§ 90-1. Prohibited act. § 90-2. Violation and penalties. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 Annual Town Meeting, Art. 8, approved 
10-27-1995. 

Amendments noted where applicable.] 
§ 90-1. Prohibited acts. 

All outdoor burning of any materials, with the exception of fires used in the 
preparation of food or fires authorized by a permit issued by the Fire 
Department, is hereby prohibited. 



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§ 90-2. Violations and penalties. 

Violation of this chapter shall be punishable by a fine in accordance with the 
fine schedule. 

Chapter 93 
BUSINESS HOURS 

§ 93-1. Nighttime quiet hours. § 93-2. Violations and penalties. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 93-1. Nighttime quiet hours. 

No person, factories, plants, contractors and/or industries shall cause to be 
generated any noise that disturbs between the hours of 12:01 a.m. and 5:59 
a.m., except on emergency snow removal or with special permission by 
written permit from the Chief of Police. 
§ 93-2. Violations and penalties. 

Violation of this chapter shall be punishable by a fine in accordance with the 
fine schedule for each offense. 

Chapter 105 

FEES- Now located at the end of the book in Fee Schedule Chapter 300 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 Annual Town Meeting, Art. 8, approved 
10-27-1995. Amendments noted where applicable.] 

Chapter 109 
GAS STATIONS 

§ 109-1. Self-serve systems. § 109-3. Free water to be provided. 

§ 109-2. Free air to be provided. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



§ 109-1. Self-serve systems. 

The dispensing of motor fuel by means of self-serve automated dispensing 
systems shall be permitted, at the option of the individual dealer. All such 
installations shall comply with the regulations promulgated by the Board of 
Fire Prevention Regulations of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
§ 109-2. Free air to be provided. 

Local gas stations shall provide free air with a pressure-measuring device. 
§ 109-3. Water. 

All local gas stations shall provide free water for the purpose of coolant. 



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Chapter 113 
HERBICIDES 

§ 1 13-1. Use by Town agencies prohibited. § 1 13-2. Form to be filed prior to application. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 

Amendments noted where applicable.] 
§ 113-1. Use by Town agencies prohibited. 

No agency of the Town shall use herbicides to control or eliminate 
vegetation. 

§ 113-2. Form to be filed prior to application. 

All professional applicators of herbicide, pesticide, insecticide, fungicide or 
rodenticide products shall file a form, approved by the Board of Health, with 
the Town Health Department prior to the application. 

Chapter 116 
HUNTING AND FIREARMS 

§ 116-1. Prohibited acts. § 116-2. Violations and penalties. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 116-1. Prohibited acts. 

No person shall hunt or fire, discharge, explode or set off any firearm within 
the limits of the Town. Target shooting is prohibited within the limits of the 
Town except where permitted, in writing, by the Chief of Police of 
Randolph. With respect to firearms, this section shall not prohibit the lawful 
defense of life or protection of property nor be applicable to any law 
enforcement official acting in the discharge of his/her duties. 
§ 116-2. Violations and penalties. 

Violation of this chapter shall be punishable by a fine in accordance with the 
fine schedule for each offense. 

Chapter 121 
JUNK DEALERS 

§ 121-1. License required. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 121-1. License required. 

No person shall be a collector of or a dealer in junk, old metals or 
secondhand articles, or a keeper of a shop for the purchase, sale or barter of 
junk, old metals or secondhand articles, unless licensed therefore by the 



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Town Council, except in accordance with the Table of Allowable Activity 
and upon a payment of a fee in accordance with the fee schedule. 

Chapter 127 
LICENSES AND PERMITS 
ARTICLE I - Fees § 127-5. Denial, revocation or suspension of 
license or permit. 

§ 127-1. Town Council. § 127-6. Payment agreement. 

§ 127-2. Local licensing authority. § 127-7. Waiver. 

§ 127-3. Authority. § 127-8. Exceptions. 

§ 127-4. List of delinquent taxpayers. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 Annual Town Meeting, Art. 8, approved 
10-27-1995.Amendments noted where applicable.] 



ARTICLE I 
Fees 

§ 127-1. Town Council. 

The Town Council shall set all fees unless otherwise determined by M.G.L. 
§ 127-2. Local licensing authority. 

The local licensing authority or the Town Council shall be empowered to set 
the fee for all hcenses under M.G.L c. 138, § 30A , and M.G.L c. 140, § 
1851. 

ARTICLE II 
Delinquent Taxpayers 

§ 127-3. Authority. 

The Town, by accepting the provisions of M.G.L c. 40, § 57, may deny any 
application or revoke or suspend any local license or permit, including 
renewals or transfers, issued by any board, officer or department for any 
person, corporation or business enterprise who or which has neglected or 
refused to pay any local taxes, fees, assessments, betterments or any other 
municipal charge. 

§ 127-4. List of delinquent taxpayers. The Tax Collector or other municipal 
official responsible for records of all municipal taxes, assessments, 
betterments and other municipal charges, hereinafter referred to as the "Tax 
Collector," shall annually furnish to each department, board, commission or 
division, hereinafter referred to as the "licensing authority," that issues 
licenses or permits, including renewals and transfers, a list of any person, 
corporation or business enterprise, hereinafter referred to as the "party," that 
has neglected or refused to pay any local taxes, fees, assessments, 
betterments or other municipal charges for not less than a twelve-month 
period and that such party has not filed in good faith a pending application 
for an abatement of such tax or a pending petition before the Appellate Tax 
Board. 



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§ 127-5. Denial, revocation or suspension of license or permit. 

The licensing authority may deny, revoke or suspend any license or permit, 
including renewals and transfers, of any party whose name appears on said 
list furnished to the licensing authority by the Tax Collector; provided, 
however, that written notice is given to the party and the Tax Collector, as 
required by applicable provisions of law, and the party is given a hearing, to 
be held not earlier than 14 days after said notice. Said list shall be prima facie 
evidence for denial, revocation or suspension of said license or permit to any 
party. The Tax Collector shall have the right to intervene in any hearing 
conducted with respect to such license denial, revocation or suspension. Any 
findings made by the licensing authority with respect to such license denial, 
revocation or suspension shall be made only for the purposes of such 
proceedings and shall not be relevant to or introduced in any other 
proceeding at law, except for any appeal from such license denial, revocation 
or suspension. Any license or permit denied, suspended or revoked under this 
article shall not be reissued or renewed until the license authority receives a 
certificate issued by the Tax Collector that the party is in good standing with 
respect to any and all local taxes, fees, assessments, betterments or other 
municipal charges, payable to the municipality as the date of issuance of said 
certificate. 

§ 127-6. Payment agreement. 

Consistent with the provisions of § 12-1 herein, any party shall be given an 
opportunity to enter into a payment agreement, thereby allowing the 
licensing authority to issue a certificate indicating said limitations to the 
license or permit, and the validity of said license shall be conditioned upon 
the satisfactory compliance with said Agreement. Any party shall be given an 
opportunity to enter into a payment agreement, thereby allowing the 
licensing authority to issue a certificate indicating said limitations to the 
license or permit, and the validity of said license shall be conditioned upon 
the satisfactory compliance with said agreement. Failure to comply with said 
agreement shall be grounds for the suspension or revocation of said license 
or permit; provided, however, that the holder be given notice and a hearing as 
required by applicable provisions of law. 
§ 127-7. Waiver. 

The Town Council may waive such denial, suspension or revocation if it 
finds that there is no direct or indirect business interest by the property 
owner, its officers or stockholders, if any, or members of the property 
owner's immediate family, as defined in M.G.L c. 268, § 1, in the business or 
activity conducted in or on said property. 
§ 127-8. Exceptions. 

A. This Article shall not apply to the following licenses and permits: open 
burning, M.G.L c. 48, § 13; bicycle permits, M.G.L c. 85, § 11 A; sales of 
articles for charitable purposes, M.G.L c. 101, § 33; children work permits, 



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M.G.L c. 149, § 69; clubs and associations dispensing food or beverage 
licenses, M.G.L c. 140, § 21E; dog licenses, M.G.L c. 140, § 137; fishing, 
hunting and trapping hcenses, M.G.L c. 131, § 12; marriage licenses, M.G.L 
c. 207, § 28; and theatrical events and public exhibition permits, M.G.L c. 
140, § 181. 

B. The Town may exclude any local license or permit from this article by 
ordinance. 



Chapter 140 
PEACE AND GOOD ORDER 



§ 140-1. General provisions. 
§ 140-2. Indecent exposure. 



§ 140-3. Graffiti and advertisements. 

§ 140-4. Deposit of waste materials 
on public property. 
§ 140-5. Carrying of a weapon on 
person or in vehicle. 



§ 140-6. Solicitation and panhandling. 

§ 140-7. Public Consumption or Use of Marijuana or 

Tetrahydrocannabinol. 

§ 140-8. Sale of drug paraphernalia, blunt wraps, bath 
salts or similar substance. 

§ 140-9. Multiple public safety responses to dwellings 



[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



GENERAL REFERENCES 



Alcoholic beverages - See Ch. 76. 

Animals - See Ch. 79. 



Hunting and firearms - See Ch. 116. 



§ 140-1. General provisions. [Amended 4-16-1996 ATM by Art. 8, 
approved 7-29-1996] No person shall throw stones, snowballs, sticks or 
other missiles, nor kick any football, nor play at any game in which a ball is 
used, nor fly any kite or balloon, nor shoot with or use a bow and arrow, gun, 
air-gun or sling, in or across any of the public ways of the Town, nor take 
hold of or ride upon the hind part of any carriage or other vehicles, without 
leave; nor drive, wheel or draw any coach, cart or other carriage of burden or 
pleasure, except children's carriages drawn by hand, upon any sidewalk in 
the Town; nor drive or permit any horse under his/her care to go or stand 
upon any sidewalk in the Town or to stand on any crosswalk; nor behave 
himself or herself in a rude or disorderly manner; nor use any profane, 
indecent or insulting language in any street or other public place in the Town 
or near any dwelling house or other buildings therein; nor be or remain upon 
any doorstep, portico or other step or projection of any such building or 
house, to the annoyance of other persons, under a penalty, in accordance with 
the fine schedule. 
§ 140-2. Indecent exposure. 

No person shall bathe or swim in any waters within the Town in a state of 
nudity in places exposed to public view, or in the immediate sight of the 



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occupant or occupants of any dwelling house, shop or factory, under a 
penalty, in accordance with the fine schedule. 
§ 140-3. Graffiti and advertisements. 

A. No person shall make any indecent figure or write any indecent or 
obscene words upon any fence, building or structure in any public place 
or upon any sidewalk or wall. 

B. No person, unless required by law so to do, shall make any marks, 
letters or figures of any kind, or place any sign, advertisement or placard 
upon or against any wall, fence, post, ledge, stone, tree, building, 
sidewalk or structure in or upon any street in this Town without the 
permission of the owner thereof 

C. No person shall cause to be placed any gang insignia or item to 
determine boundaries upon any building, sidewalk roadway, wire, rock, 
sign or other pertinent structure within the limits of the Town. 

§ 140-4. Deposit of waste materials on public property. 

No person shall throw debris, rubbish or waste material or cause spillage of 

any of the aforementioned materials to be deposited on a public way or 

sidewalk, or public property under a penalty in accordance with the fine 

schedule. 

§ 140-5. Carrying of a weapon on person or in vehicle. 

A. No person except as provided by law, shall carry on his or her 
person, or carry under his or her control, in a vehicle, including those 
weapons and instruments mentioned in Chapter 269 of the General Laws, 
Section 10, Paragraph (b) and Section 12, and weapon or object 
commonly called "nunchucks," of any substance or material, a shotgun 
having a barrel less than eighteen inches in length, any saber, sword or 
weapon of like or similar nature, any knife having any type of blade in 
excess of two and one-half inches (except when actually engaged in 
hunting or fishing or in going directly to and/or returning directly from 
such activities, or in any employment which requires the use of any type 
of knife), or other object or tool so redesigned, fashioned, prepared or 
treated that the same may be used to inflict bodily harm or injury to 
another. 

B. Violation of any provision of this section shall be subject to arrest 
and a fine in accordance with the fine schedule. 

§ 140-6. Solicitation and panhandling. 

A. No panhandling or soliciting shall be done that prohibits free flow of 
traffic, unless a permit is issued to do so. Persons wishing to panhandle 
or solicit, shall obtain said permit from the Town Manager's Office at 
Town Hall. 

B. In the interest of the public's health and safety, no person shall solicit 
nor panhandle so as to request an immediate donation of money or other 
thing of value from another person, regardless of the solicitor's purpose 



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or intended use of the money or other value. The solicitation may be, 
without limitation, by 

( 1 ) The spoken word 

(2) The written word 

(3) The printed word 

(4) Bodily gestures 

(5) Signs 

(6) Any other means of communication 

C. No person shall permit any conduct that is 

(1) Intended to or is likely to cause a reasonable person to fear 
imminent bodily harm or the commission of a criminal act upon 
property in that person's immediate possession. 

(2) Intended to or is likely to cause a reasonable person to be 
intimidated into responding affirmatively to the solicitation. 

D. No person shall persistently closely follow or approach a person, 
after the person solicited has been solicited and informed the solicitor by 
words or conduct that such person does not want to be solicited or does 
not want to give money or any other thing of value to the solicitor. 

E. No person shall intentionally or recklessly block or interfere with the 
safe or free passage of the person being solicited, whether the person is a 
pedestrian or the operator of a vehicle, including the situation where the 
person takes evasive action to avoid physical contact with the person 
making the solicitation. 

F. No person shall intentionally touch or make any physical contact 
with the person being solicited in the course of the solicitation without 
the person's consent. 

G. No person shall solicit or panhandle within ten (10) feet of the 
entrance or exit of a bank, financial institution and/or ATM during the 
hours of operation. 

H. Any person who violates this ordinance shall be subject to a fine in 
accordance with the fine schedule. 

§ 140-7. Public Consumption or Use of Marijuana or 
Tetrahydrocannabinol. 

A. No person, whether in or upon a vehicle, motor vehicle, conveyance, 
or on foot, shall bum, smoke, display, roll, ingest, or otherwise use or 
consume marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol (as defined in M.G.L. c. 
94C, § 1, as amended) while in or upon any area owned by or under the 
control of the Town of Randolph, including but not limited to, any street, 
sidewalk, public way, footway, passageway, stairs, bridge, park, 
playground, beach, recreation area, boat landing, public building, school, 
school grounds, cemetery, or parking lot; or in or upon any place to 
which the public has a right of access as invitees or licensees. 



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B. The consumption of marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol is also 
prohibited in any motor vehicle in or on a public way whether or not the 
user is operating the vehicle or whether the vehicle is in operation at all. 

C. Any marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol burned, smoked, ingested, or 
otherwise used or consumed in violation of this ordinance shall be 
seized, held, and disposed of in accordance with M.G.L. c. 94C, § 47A. 

D. Whoever is found in violation of this ordinance shall, when 
requested by an official authorized to enforce this ordinance, state his or 
her true name and address to said official. 

E. This ordinance may be enforced through any lawful means in law or 
in equity including, but not limited to, enforcement by criminal 
indictment or complaint pursuant to M.G.L. c. 40, § 21, or by non- 
criminal disposition pursuant to M.G.L. c. 40, § 2 ID, by any police 
officer. 

F. The fine for a violation of this ordinance shall be in accordance with 
the fine schedule for each offense. A penalty imposed under this 
ordinance shall be in addition to any civil penalty imposed under M.G.L. 
c. 94C, § 32L. 

§ 140-8. Sale of drug paraphernalia, blunt wraps, bath salts or similar 
substance. 

In the interest of the public's health and safety the following are not 
permitted for sale: drug paraphernalia, blunt wraps, bath salts or similar 
substance, within the Town of Randolph. 

As used in this section, the following words shall, unless the context clearly 
requires otherwise, have the following meanings: 

BATH SALTS- 

(1) a drug which contains any quantity of barbituric acid or any of the 
salts of barbituric acid; or any derivative of barbituric acid which the 
United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare has by 
regulation designated as habit forming; or 

(2) a drug which contains any quantity of amphetamine or any of its 
optical isomers; any salt of amphetamine or any salt of an optical isomer 
of amphetamine; or any substance which the United States Attorney 
General has by regulation designated as habit forming because of its 
stimulant effect on the central nervous system; or 



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(3) lysergic acid diethylamide; or 

(4) any drug except marijuana which contains any quantity of a 
substance which the United States Attorney General has by regulation 
designated as having a potential for abuse because of its depressant or 
stimulant effect on the central nervous system or its hallucinogenic 
effect. 

BLUNT WRAP- Any tobacco product manufactured or packaged as a wrap 
or as a hollow tube made wholly or in part from tobacco that is designed to 
be filled by the consumer with loose tobacco or other fillers. 

DRUG PARAPHERNALIA- all equipment, products, devices and materials 
of any kind which are primarily intended or designed for use in planting, 
propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, 
converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, 
repackaging, storing, containing, concealing, ingesting, inhaling or otherwise 
introducing into the human body a controlled substance in violation of this 
chapter. It includes, but is not limited to: 

( 1 ) kits used, primarily intended for use or designed for use in planting, 
propagating, cultivating, growing or harvesting of any species of plant 
which is a controlled substance or from which a controlled substance can 
be derived; 

(2) kits used, primarily intended for use or designed for use in 
manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing or 
preparing controlled substances; 

(3) isomerization devices used, primarily intended for use or designed 
for use in increasing the potency of any species of plant which is a 
controlled substance; 

(4) testing equipment used, primarily intended for use or designed for 
use in identifying or in analyzing the strength, effectiveness or purity of 
controlled substances; 

(5) scales and balances used, primarily intended for use or designed for 
use in weighing or measuring controlled substances; 

(6) diluents and adulterants, such as quinine hydrochloride, mannitol, 
mannite, dextrose and lactose, used, primarily intended for use or 
designed for use in cutting controlled substances; 

(7) separation gins and sifters used, primarily intended for use or 
designed for use in removing twigs and seeds from or in otherwise 
cleaning or refining marijuana; 

(8) blenders, bowls, containers, spoons and mixing devices used, 
primarily intended for use or designed for use in compounding controlled 
substances; 



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(9) capsules, balloons, envelopes and other containers used, primarily 
intended for use or designed for use in packaging small quantities of 
controlled substances; 

(10) containers and other objects used, primarily intended for use or 
designed for use in storing or concealing controlled substances; 

(11) objects used, primarily intended for use or designed for use in 
ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing marijuana, cocaine, hashish 
or hashish oil into the human body, such as: 

(a) metal, wooden, acrylic, glass, stone, plastic or ceramic pipes, 
which pipes may or may not have screens, permanent screens, 
hashish heads or punctured metal bowls; 

(b) water pipes; 

(c) carburetion tubes and devices; 

(d) smoking and carburetion masks; 

(e) roach clips; meaning objects used to hold burning material, such 
as a marijuana cigarette that has become too small or too short to be 
held in the hand; 

(f) miniature cocaine spoons and cocaine vials; 

(g) chamber pipes; 

(h) carburetor pipes; 

(i) electric pipes; 
(j) air-driven pipes; 
(k) chillums; 

(1) bongs; 

(m) ice pipes or chillers; 
(n) wired cigarette papers; 
(o) cocaine freebase kits. 

§ 140-9. Multiple public safety responses to dwellings. 

When a landlord does not reside on the property they own and the police 
details and fees associated with the same. 

A. Definitions 

Problem Property- 1 . The Police Department has been called to the property 
not fewer than four times within the preceding twelve-month period for any 
incident involving any arrestable offense including but not limited to 
disturbing the peace, trespassing, underage drinking or assault; or 2. the 
Police Department has received not fewer than four (4) sustained complaints 
for noise within the preceding twelve-month period; or 3. the Inspectional 
Services Department or the Public Health Department have received not 



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fewer than four(4) sustained complaints within the preceding twelve- month 
period for noxious, noisome or unsanitary conditions. 

Valid Complaint- an investigated finding, documented by on-duty Police 
Department personnel dispatched or caused to respon to an incident, that a 
criminal act has taken place in a dwelling unit within a property, on a 
particular property or at a specific location which distrbs the health, safety 
and welfare of other inhabitants of said property or location. The term shall 
not include incidents involving an occupant of the premises as the victim of 
the crime. 

Police Response- any and all police action deemed appropriate by the Police 
Chief to protect the health, safety and welfare of inhabitants of a property or 
location where valid complaints have been documented. Coordination of 
police action shall be subject to the rules and regulations of the police 
department. 

B. Police response. 
The Police Chief, as deemed appropriate to protect the health, safety and 
welfare of other inhabitants of a property or location where a valid complaint 
has been made, is hereby authorized and empowered to assign a member or 
members of the police department to staff as police response on said property 
or location; 

(1) Upon being dispatched or caused to respond to an incident, in a 
dwelling unit within a property, or a particular property or at a 
specific location, involving a criminal offense, police department 
personnel shall investigate the complaint to determine whether it is a 
valid complaint. 

(2) Upon finding a valid complaint, police department personnel 
shall make a record of the incident and shall keep, within the 
department's control, a record of the number of incidents which 
occur in said dwelling unit within a property, particular property or 
location. 

(3) After four (4) valid complaints incidents have occurred in a 
twelve-month period relating to the occupancy of a dwelling unit 
within a property, on a particular property or at a specific location, 
the Police Chief, or his designee, may notify the Chair of Town 
Manager's Task Force on problem Properties/Code Enforcement 
Officer and shall submit to the Chair/Code Enforcement Officer the 
all-calls report relating to police response at said dwelling, particular 
property or location. 



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C. Duties of the Task Force. 

(1) The Chair/Code Enforcement Officer shall create a master file of 
all information received from the Chief pertaining to that dwelling 
unit, particular property or location an shall discuss said information 
with the members of the Task Force/Code Enforcement Officer at a 
monthly meeting at Town Hall. 

(2) If a specific address falls within the definition of a problem 
property, the Chair of the Task Force/Code Enforcement Officer 
shall notify in writing, the property owner by regular and certified 
mail, return receipt requested, sent to the property owner's residence 
or usual place of business that is on record at the Assessor's Office. 
The notification shall identify: 

(a) The property owner and list the specific address that has 
been designated a problem property. 

(b) The number of valid complaint incidents which have 
occurred on said property within a twelve-month period. 

(c) The Randolph Police Contact the property owner may 
contact to coordinate a plan to resolve the incidents at the 
particular property or location, and/or inform the Randolph 
Police of problem complaint(s). 

(d) Where and to whom the property owner must address a letter 
of appeal of the Task Force's/Code Enforcement Officer's 
decision. 

(3) In making a final designation of a property as a problem 
property, the Chair of the Task Force/Code Enforcement Officer 
shall take into consideration the nature of the complaints, the number 
of dwelling units at the property, and the nature of the use of said 
property. 

(4) Upon receipt of confirmation from the Police Chief, or his 
designee, that the owner of a particular property deemed problematic 
has cooperated with the Randolph Police Department in addressing 
each specified valid complaint, the Task Force/Code Enforcement 
Officer shall remove said property from designation as a problem 
property. 

D. Cost of Police response assigned to problem properties. 

( 1 ) The Police Chief, or his designee, shall keep an accurate record 
of the cost of police response to the dwelling unit within a property, 
a particular property or a specific location, and such record shall 
include the number of officers who are part of the determined 
response. 

(2) The Police Chief shall forward such record to the Treasurer- 
Collector. 



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(3) After eight (8) valid complaint incidents in a twelve-month 
period relating to occupants of a dwelling unit within a property, a 
particular property or a specific location, the Police Chief, at his 
discretion, shall determine whether the cost of a police response 
should be assessed to the property owner and shall notify and submit 
said determination to the Chair of the Task Force/Code Enforcement 
Officer. 

(4) The Chair of the Task Force/Code Enforcement Officer shall 
notify, in writing, the property owner of the Chiefs decision to 
assess the cost of the police response. The notification shall: 

(a) Be delivered by regular and certified mail, return receipt 
requested, sent to the property owner's residence or usual place 
of business that is on record at the Assessor's Office. 

(b) Identify the number of valid complaint incidents that have 
occurred since the first notification. 

(c) Where appropriate, inform the property owner of his failure 
to contact the Randolph Police Contact to coordinate a plan to 
resolve the incidents at a dwelling unit within a property, 
occupant(s). 

(d) Inform the property owner that he shall be subject to the 
penalties addressed in subsection E. 

(e) Indicate where and to whom the property owner must 
address a letter of appeal of police response costs assigned to 
him. 

(f) Inform the property owner he has seven (7) days to file an 
appeal. 

(5) The Police Chief should consider the following factors in 
making his decision to assess costs: 

(a) The nature, scope and seriousness of the incident(s). 

(b) Whether the incident(s) resulted in an arrest. 

(c) A history of the criminal activity taking place at the property 
or location. 

(d) The property owner's and occupant's willingness to 
cooperate with Police. 

(e) The total number of properties owned by the property owner 
relative to the number of said properties deemed problematic. 

(6) Nothing in this ordinance shall limit the statutory authority of the 
Police Chief to investigate crimes, allocate police resources and 
enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Town of Randolph. 

E. Penalties. 

( 1 ) The Treasurer-Collector is hereby authorized and empowered to 
bill the property owner for the costs the Town incurred for its police 



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response in addition to any individual costs during the period of 
police response to the particular property or location. The property 
owner is responsible for payment of the bill in full within thirty (30) 
days of receiving the bill. All amounts collected by the Treasurer- 
Collector shall be deposited into the general fund of the Town. 
(2) Any unpaid bill for police response, including interest and/or 
collection costs, shall be added to the real estate tax on the property 
and collected as part of that tax. Failure to pay real estate taxes will 
render the property owner delinquent and the Treasurer-Collector 
shall commence foreclosure proceedings. 

F. Property Owner's Rights. 

(1) The property owner may, within seven (7) days of receipt of the 
notification, appeal the Chiefs decision to assess costs by 
requesting, in writing, a hearing before a three (3) person panel 
appointed by the Town Manager. 

(2) Once the panel makes a decision it must be in writing. If the 
panel finds in favor of the property owner, the cost of the penalty 
shall be abated. 

G. Eviction. 

In the event the property owner has, in good faith, commenced eviction 
proceedings against the tenant(s) responsible for the incidents at the property, 
then the application of this ordinance shall be stayed until the eviction 
process is concluded. The Police Chief may continue police response at the 
particular property or location, at his discretion, at all times after the eviction 
proceeding has been completed; provided, however, that such costs shall not 
be assessed to the property owner if the eviction proceedings conclude in 
favor of the property owner. 

H. Charges to constitute municipal Hen pursuant to M.G.L. c. 40 § 58. 
All charges to recover costs imposed in this ordinance shall constitute a 
municipal lien on the property so charged in accordance with M.G.L. c. 40 § 
58. 

I. Report. 

The Chair of the Task Force/Code Enforcement Officer shall submit a report 
to the Town Manager and the Town Council no later than three (3) months 
after the one (1) year anniversary of the enactment date of this ordinance. 
This report shall include the total cost of administration of this ordinance, as 
well as an accounting of all revenues collected in association with it. Said 
report shall also contain data regarding all dwellings within a property, 
particular properties or locations which remain problem properties and those 
that are no longer designated as problem properties. The report shall also 
include the general impact, if any, that the implementation of this order has 
on the health, safety, and welfare of the residents of the Town of Randolph. 



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Chapter 141 
UNREASONABLE NOISE 

§ 141-1. General Prohibition and Definitions. 

§ 141-2 . Unreasonable Noise Making 
Automobile Safet>' Devices. 

§ 141-3. Unreasonable Noise from 
Automobile Safety Devices. 
§ 141-4. Regulation of Construction Hours. 
§ 141-5. Noise Levels at Residential Lot Lines. 

§ 141-6. Disturbing the Peace. 
§ 141-7. Prohibition Against Certain Sound 

Devices in Motor Vehicles. 

§ 141-1. General Prohibition and Definitions. 

No person shall make or cause to be made any unreasonable or excessive 
noise in the Town, by whatever means or from whatever means or from 
whatever source. 

As used herein, the following terms shall have the following meanings: 

A. "dBa" shall mean A-weighted sound level in decibels, as measured 
by a general purpose sound level meter complying with the provisions of 
the American National Standards Institute, "Specifications for Sound 
Level Meters (ANSI SI. 4 1971)", properly calibrated, and operated on 
the "A" weighting network. 

B. "Loud amplification device" or similar equipment shall mean a 
radio, television, phonograph, stereo, record player, tape player, cassette 
player, compact disc player, loud speaker, or sound amplifier which is 
operated in such a manner that it creates unreasonable or excessive noise. 

C. "Unreasonable" or "excessive noise" shall mean: 

(1) Noise measured in excess of 50 dBa between the hours of 1 1:00 
p.m. and 7:00 a.m., or in excess of 70 dBa at all other hours; or 

(2) In the absence of an applicable noise level standard, any noise 
plainly audible at a distance of three hundred (300') feet or, in the 
case of loud amplification devices or similar equipment, noise 
plainly audible at a distance of one hundred (100') feet from its 
source by a person of normal hearing. 

§ 141-2. Unreasonable noise-making automobile safety devices. 

The use, maintenance, installation or keeping of any device whose purpose it 
is to protect an owner's vehicle from damage and/or theft through the 



§ 141-8. Prohibition Against Loud 
Amplification Devices in Public 
Ways or Places. 

§ 141-9. Prohibition Against Loud 
Amplification Devices in or on 
Residential Premises. 
§ 141-10. Enforcement. 

§ 141-11. Penalties. 

§ 141-12. Arrest and Seizure of 

Property. 

§ 141-13. Exemptions. 



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mechanical creation of a noise of sufficient magnitude to be plainly audible 
at a distance of two hundred (200') feet from such device which does not 
automatically terminate any such noise within five (5) minutes shall be 
unlawful. Penalty for violation of this section shall be a fine of fifty ($50.00) 
dollars in accordance with the fine schedule. This section shall be deemed a 
part of the Environment Protection Ordinances, so called, and shall be 
enforced pursuant to the provisions of M.G.L. c. 40, Section 2 ID. 
§ 141-3. Unreasonable noise from automobile safety devices. 
The use of any device whose purpose it is to protect an owner's vehicle from 
damage and/or theft through the mechanical creation of a noise of sufficient 
magnitude to be plainly audible at a distance of two hundred (200') feet from 
such device which does not automatically terminate any such noise within 
five (5) minutes shall be declared an unlawful use of a noise making 
instrument. The penalty for violation of this ordinance shall be in accordance 
with the fine schedule and shall be in compliance with the provisions of 
M.G.L. c. 40, Section 2 ID. This section shall be deemed a part of the 
Environment Protection Ordinances, so called. 
§141-4. Regulation of construction hours. 

No erection, demolition, alteration, or repair of any building and excavation 
in regard thereto, except between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., on 
weekdays or except in the interest of public safety or welfare, upon the 
issuance of and pursuant to a permit from the Building Commissioner, which 
permit may be renewed for one or more periods of not exceeding one week 
each. 

§ 141-5. Noise levels at residential lot lines. 

It shall be unlawful for any person except in emergencies by Public Utility 
Companies to operate any construction device(s), including but not limited to 
impact devices, on any construction site if the operation of such device(s) 
emits noise, measured at the lot line of a residential lot in excess of 50 dBa 
between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. 
§ 141-6. Disturbing the peace. 

A. It shall be unlawful for any person or persons in a residential area 
within the Town of Randolph to disturb the peace by causing or allowing 
to be made any unreasonable or excessive noise, including but not 
limited to such noise resulting from the operation of any radio, 
phonograph or sound related producing device or instrument, or from the 
playing of any band or orchestra, or from the use of any device to 
amplify the aforesaid noise, or from the making of excessive outcries, 
exclamations, or loud singing or any other excessive noise by a person or 
group of persons, or from the use of any device to amplify such noise 
provided, however, that any performance, concert, establishment, band, 
group or person who has received and maintains a valid license or permit 
from any department, board or commission of the Town of Randolph 



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authorized to issue such license or permit shall be exempt from the 
provisions of this section. Unreasonable or excessive noise shall be 
defined as noise measured in excess of 50 dBa between the hours of 
1 1:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m. or in excess of 70 dBa at all other hours when 
measured not closer than the lot line of a residential lot or from the 
nearest affected dwelling unit. The term dBa shall mean the A-weighted 
sound level in decibels, as measured by a general purpose sound level 
meter complying with the provisions of the American National Standards 
Institute, "Specifications for Sound Level Meters (ANSI SI. 4 1971)", 
properly calibrated, and operated on the "A" weighting network. 
B. Any person aggrieved by such disturbance of the peace may 
complain to the police about such unreasonable or excessive noise. The 
police, in response to each complaint, shall verify by use of the sound 
level meter described herein that the noise complained of does exceed 
the limit described herein and if so, may thereupon arrest and/or make 
application in the appropriate court for issuance of a criminal complaint 
for violation of M.G.L. c. 272, S. 53, which sets forth the penalties for 
disturbing the peace. 
§ 141-7. Prohibition against certain sound devices in motor vehicles. 

A. It shall be unlawful for any person in any area of the Town to operate 
a loud amplification device or similar equipment, as defined in 
subsection 141-1, in or on a motor vehicle which is either moving or 
standing in a public way. 

B. No person shall operate or use on any public right-of-way any 
electronically operated or electronic sound signal device attached to, on 
or in a motor vehicle from which food or any other items are sold or 
offered for sale when the vehicle is stopped, standing, or parked. This 
subsection shall not apply to sound signal devices used as a safety 
device, such as but not limited to a car horn or back-up signal that is 
actually used for its intended purpose. For the purposes of this 
subdivision the term "stopped" means the halting of a vehicle, whether 
occupied or not, except when necessary to avoid conflict with other 
traffic or in compliance with a police officer or other authorized 
enforcement officer or a traffic control sign or signal. For purposes of 
this subdivision, the terms "standing" and "parked" shall be as defined in 
the Town of Randolph Traffic Rules and Regulations. 

§ 141-8. Prohibition against loud amplification devices in public ways or 
places. 

It shall be unlawful for any person in any area of the Town to operate a loud 
amplification device or similar equipment, as defined in subsection 141-1, in 
a public way or in any other public place. 



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§141-9. Prohibition against loud amplification devices in or on 
residential premises. 

It shall be unlawful for any person in any area of the Town to operate a loud 
amplification device or similar equipment, as defined in subsection 141-1, in 
a dwelling house or on the land or other premises of such dwelling house. 
§ 141-10. Enforcement. 

Subsections 141-7, 141-8, or 141-9 may be enforced by any police officer, 
any special police officer designated by the Police Chief to do so, or by the 
Board of Health. 
§ 141-11. Penalties. 

A. Any person who violates subsections 141-1, 141-8 or 141-9 shall be 
fined in accordance with the fine schedule. The enforcing person shall 
make a record of the complaint, such record to include the following 
information, to the extent that it is available: (i) name and address of 
person in violation, (ii) name and address of landlord of person in 
violation, if applicable, (iii) date of violation, (iv) time of violation, (v) 
location of violation, (vi) source of violation, and (vii) motor vehicle 
registration number, if applicable. If the person in violation refuses to 
provide the above-required information or if any information provided 
proves to be false, then said person shall be punished by a fine in 
accordance with the fine schedule. 

B. No person, being the landlord or person in charge of a residential 
structure shall permit, allow, or suffer repeated violations of these 
ordinances after notice thereof and shall be fined at the time of the third 
such violation and at the time of every violation thereafter within twelve 
(12) months of the first violation by a fine in accordance with the fine 
schedule and by a fine also in accordance with the fine schedule for each 
violation thereafter. It shall be a defense that the landlord or person in 
charge of a residential structure has made and documented good faith 
efforts, including but not limited to the seeking of a court order, to 
prevent violations. 

C. For all other violations of these secdons, the penalties for such 
violations are: in accordance with the fine schedule. 

D. The enforcing person shall provide a person in violation with a 
written notice of the violation and fine. If applicable, a copy of each 
notice of violation shall be sent to the person in violation's landlord and 
to the school, college, or university at which the person in violation is 
enrolled. 

E. All fines issued under these sections may be recovered by the 
noncriminal disposition procedures promulgated in M.G.L. c. 40, s. 2 ID, 
which procedures are incorporated herein by reference; provided, 
however, that if a person in violation fails to follow the procedures and 



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requirements of M.G.L. c.'40, s. 21D, then the fine or fines shall be 
recovered by indictment or by complaint pursuant to M.G.L. c. 40, s. 41. 
§ 141-12. Arrest and seizure of property. 

A. Notwithstanding the provisions of any other ordinance of the Town 
of Randolph, if a person is arrested by a Randolph police officer under 
the authority of the Massachusetts General Laws, including without 
limitation the provisions of M.G.L. c. 272, sec. 54 for disturbing the 
peace under M.G.L. c. 272, sec. 53, or any applicable Massachusetts 
General Law, the arresting officer may, pursuant to said General Laws, 
seize any loud amplification device or similar equipment, as defined in 
subsection 141-1 as evidence. In the event of such seizure for evidence 
by a Randolph police officer incident to such arrest, such amplification 
device or similar equipment shall be inventoried and held by the 
Randolph Police Department or its agents, and shall be returned to its 
owner according to the terms of this section, unless a court of competent 
jurisdiction orders otherwise. 

B. The arresting officer, in addition to any other reports or procedures 
required of him, shall give the person claiming to be the owner of said 
loud amplification device or similar equipment a receipt indicating 
where, when, and for what reason said device or equipment was seized, 
and for what purpose it is being held. Copies of said receipt shall be filed 
in the Randolph Police Department and shall be made available to the 
court. No receipt shall be redeemed and no such device or equipment 
shall be returned to any person unless and until all judicial proceedings 
that may be held regarding the criminal allegations shall have been 
finally completed; provided, however, that if a motor vehicle shall be 
seized incident to an arrest, such motor vehicle may be returned to its 
registered owner if said loud amplification device or equipment has been 
duly removed therefrom with the written permission of the registered 
owner of said motor vehicle. In such cases, the Police Department shall 
provide said owner with a receipt for the removed device or equipment 
as herein provided. 

§ 141-13. Exemptions. 

The following are exempted from the provisions of Section 14 land shall not 
be considered unreasonable or excessive noise for purposes of this section: 

A. Noise from law enforcement motor vehicles. 

B. Noise from emergency vehicles which is emitted during an actual 
emergency. 

C. Noise which a person is making or causing to be made where such 
person has received and maintains a valid license or permit therefor from 
any department, board or commission of the Town authorized to issue 
such license or permit; provided, however, that such noise shall be 
permitted only to the extent allowed by the license or permit. 



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Chapter 143 
PEDDLING AND SOLICITING 



ARTICLE I HAWKERS AND PEDDLERS 
§ 143-L Permit required. 
§ 143-2. Registration with Chief of Police; 
vehicle identification. 

§ 143-3. Disturbance of the peace prohibited. 

§ 143-4. License to sell fruit and vegetables. 

§ 143-5. Sale of nonpetroleum products 

from gasoline station. 

§ 143-6. Violations and penalties. 

ARTICLE II PROHIBITED MERCHANDISE 

§ 143-7. Silly string. 

§ 143-8. Stink bombs. 

ARTICLE HI SOLICITORS AND CANVASSERS 



§ 143-9. License required; applicability. 
§ 143-10. Definitions. 

§ 143-11. Application; fee; waiver. 
§ 143-12. Investigation; approval 
or disapproval; issuance of license. 
§ 143-13. Enforcement; transfers. 

§ 143-14. Revocation of license; appeals. 

§ 143-15. Expiration of license. 

§ 143-16. Renewal of license. 

§ 143-17. Misrepresentation. 

§ 143-18. Trespassing. 

§ 143-19. Violations and penalties. 



[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



ARTICLE I 
Hawkers and Peddlers 

§ 143-1. Permit required. 

No person shall sell, solicit or display goods, articles, wares or merchandise 
upon the public ways of the Town unless duly licensed to do so by first 
having obtained a written permit from the Town Manager. 
§ 143-2. Registration with Chief of Police vehicle identification. 
No person shall hawk or peddle any of the articles enumerated in M.G.L c. 
101, § 17, and all amendments thereof until he or she has recorded his/her 
name and residence with the Chief of Police and has been assigned a number 
by the Chief of Police, nor unless any vehicle or receptacle in which he or 
she may carry or convey such articles shall have painted on the outside 
thereof, in letters and figures at least two inches in height, the name of the 
person selling and the number given the person by the Chief of Police and be 
approved on the first Monday in every month by the Chief of Police. 
§ 143-3. Disturbance of the peace prohibited. 

No person hawking, peddling, selling or exposing for sale any article 
enumerated in M.G.L c. 101, § 17, and acts in amendment thereof, shall cry 
his/her wares to the disturbance of the peace or comfort of the inhabitants of 
the Town. 

§ 143-4. License to sell fruit and vegetables. 

A. The Town Manager may from time to time grant licenses to suitable 
persons to be hawkers and peddlers of fruit and vegetables within the 
Town. 

B. Every license so granted shall expire on the first day of May next 
following the date thereof, but no such license shall be effective until the 



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I 

licensee shall have paid to tfie Town Treasurer a fee in accordance with 
the fee schedule. 
§ 143-5. Sale of nonpetroleum products from gasoline station. 

A. No hawker or peddler or transient vendor, as defined in M.G.L c. { 
101, shall sell nonpetroleum products from a gasoline station site unless 
licensed to do so by the Town Manager. 

B. Violation of the foregoing shall be punishable by a fme in 
accordance with the fme schedule. 

§ 143-6. Violations and penalties. 

Any hawker or peddler of fruit or vegetables who conducts his/her business 
within the Town and is not licensed as provided in § 143-4 of this article and 
any person who violates any of the provisions of the foregoing sections of 
this article shall be punished by a fme in accordance with the fme schedule. 

ARTICLE II 
Prohibited Merchandise 

§ 143-7. Silly string. 

A. No hawkers or peddlers, merchants or any other person shall sell or 
barter or offer for sale or barter any goods or merchandise capable of 
spraying or shooting an object from a closed container by means of 
compressed air or gas, consisting of items commonly referred to as 
'liquid string" or "silly string." 

B. Persons violating this section shall be punished by a fme in 
accordance with the fme schedule. | 

§ 143-8. Stink bombs. | 

A. No hawkers or peddlers, merchants or any other person shall sell or 
barter or offer for sale or barter within the Town any goods or 
merchandise capable, upon being triggered by crushing or stamping 
upon, of emitting noisome or unpleasant odors from an enclosed 
container, including but not limited to goods or merchandise commonly 
referred to as "stink bombs." 

B. Persons violating this section shall be punished by a fme in 
accordance with the fme schedule. 

ARTICLE III 
Solicitors and Canvassers 
§ 143-9. License required; applicability. 

It shall be unlawful for any solicitor or canvasser, as defined in this article, to 
engage in such business within the Town without first obtaining a license 
therefore in compliance with the provisions of this article. The provisions of 
this article shall not apply to any person exempted under M.G.L c. 101 or to 
any person duly licensed under M.G.L c. 101 or to any person exempted by | 
another general law, nor shall this article be construed to prevent route 



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salesmen or other persons having estabHshed customers to whom they make 
periodic dehveries from calhng upon such customers or from making calls 
upon prospective customers to solicit an order for future periodic route 
deliveries. 

§ 143-10. Definitions. 

As used in this article, the following terms shall have the meanings indicated: 
SOLICITOR OR CANVASSER - Any person who, for himself or herself or 
for another person, firm or corporation, travels, by foot, automobile or any 
other type of conveyance, from place to place, from house to house or from 
street to street taking or attempting to lease or take orders for retail sale of 
goods, wares, merchandise or services, including, without limitation, the 
selling, distributing, exposing for sale or soliciting orders for magazines, 
books, periodicals or other articles of a commercial nature, the contracting of 
all home improvements or for services to be performed in the future whether 
or not such individual has, carries or exposes for retail sale a sample of the 
subject of such sale or whether he or she is collecting advance payment on 
such retail sales. 

§ 143-11. Application; fee; waiver. 

A. Applicants for a license shall file with the Chief of Police, on a form 
issued by the Police Department, a written application, signed under the 
penalties of perjury, containing the following information: 

(1) Name of applicant. 

(2) Address of applicant (local and permanent home address). 

(3) Applicant's height, weight and eye and hair color. 

(4) Applicant's social security number. 

(5) The length of time for which the right to do business is desired. 

(6) A brief description of the nature of the business and the goods to 
be sold. 

(7) The name and home office address of the applicant's employer. 
If self-employed it shall so state. 

(8) A photograph of the applicant, which picture shall be submitted 
by the applicant and shall be two by two inches, showing the head 
and shoulders of the applicant in a clear and distinguishing manner. 

(9) If operating a motor vehicle, the year, make, model, motor 
number, registration number, state of registration, vehicle's owner 
and address. 

B. At the time of filing the application, each applicant shall pay a fee in 
accordance with the fee schedule. 

C. The Chief of Police may waive any provision of this section. 

§ 143-12. Investigation; approval of disapproval; issuance of license. 

A. Upon receipt of the application, the Chief of Police shall investigate 
the applicant's reputation as to morals and integrity. 



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B. After an investigation of the applicant's morals and integrity, but 
within seven calendar days of the filing of the application, the Chief of 
Police shall endorse on such application approval or disapproval. Failure 
of the Police Chief to act on said permit within seven calendar days of 
the applicant's filing shall constitute approval. If disapproved, the 
applicant shall have the right of appeal to the Town Manager in writing 
within seven calendar days of the denial by the Chief of Police. The 
Town Manager must act on the appeal at one of their next two regularly 
scheduled meetings. Failure to so act shall be deemed approval. 

C. Such license when issued shall contain the signature of the Chief of 
Police or the Town Manager and shall show the name, address and 
photograph of said licensee, the date of issuance and the length of time 
the same shall be operative, as well as the license number. The Police 
Department shall keep a record of all licenses issued for a period of six 
years. Solicitors and canvassers, when engaged in the business of 
soliciting or canvassing, are required to display an identifying badge 
issued by the Police Department by wearing said badge on an outer 
garment. Each licensee is required to possess an individual license. 

D. All Applicants shall comply with the Fingerprint Identification 
Ordinance. 

§ 143-13. Enforcement; transfers. | 

The police officers of the Town shall enforce this article. No license shall be 
transferred. 

§ 143-14. Revocation of license; appeals. I 

Any license granted under this article may be revoked by the Chief of Police 
upon conviction by the licensee of any crime that, in the judgment of the 
Chief, warrants such revocation, or upon submission to the Chief of evidence 
satisfactory to the Chief that, during the term of the license, the licensee has 
violated any provision of this article, or for any other sufficient cause. Any 
person aggrieved by such revocation may appeal to the Town Manager 
within seven calendar days, and a hearing will be scheduled for one of the 
next two regularly scheduled meetings of the Town Manager. 
§ 143-15. Expiration of license. 

Each license issued under the provisions of this article shall continue in force 
from the date of its issue until the 31st day of December following, unless 
sooner revoked. 
§ 143-16. Renewal of license. 

A license issued under the provisions of this article may be renewed by the 
Chief of Police. An applicant requesting a renewal of a license must apply in 
person for such license renewal and provide such information as is required 
to obtain an initial license. 



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§ 143-17. Misrepresentation. 

A. No solicitor or canvasser, licensed or exempted from license, may 
represent, in any manner, the buyer's right to cancel as stipulated by M. 
G. L. c. 93,93A and255D. 

B. No solicitor or canvasser, licensed or exempted from license, may 
use any plan, scheme or ruse which misrepresents the true status or 
mission of the person making the call in order to gain admission to a 
prospective buyer's home, office or other establishment with the purpose 
of making a sale of consumer goods or services. 

§ 143-18. Trespassing. 

It shall be unlawful for any canvasser or solicitor to enter the premises of a 
resident or business who or which has displayed a no-trespassing or no- 
soliciting sign or poster. Further, it shall be unlawful for canvassers or 
solicitors to ignore a resident's or businessperson's "no solicitation" directive 
or remain on private property after its owner has indicated that the canvasser 
or solicitor is not welcome. 
§ 143-19. Violations and penalties. 

Any person violating any provision of this article shall, upon violation, be 
punished by a fme in accordance with the fme schedule. 

Chapter 144 
ICE CREAM VENDING PERMITS 

§ 144-1. Definitions. § 144-2. Ice Cream Vending Permit Requirements. 

§ 144-1. Definitions. 

As used in this chapter, the following terms shall have the meanings as 
defined in this section: 

A. "Ice cream truck" means a motor vehicle in which ice cream, 
popsicles, ice sherbets or other frozen desserts of any kind are carried for 
the purpose of retail sale on the streets of the town. 

B. "Vend" or "vending" means offering ice cream, popsicles, ice 
sherbets, frozen desserts, or, as incidental thereto, other food items which 
are prepackaged by the manufacturer and do not require further 
processing, such as gum, candy, juice, chips, and soft drinks, for sale 
from an ice cream truck on the streets of the town. 

§ 144-2. Ice cream vending permit required. 

A. General. No person shall operate or permit an ice cream truck owned 
or controlled by such person to be operated as an ice cream truck on the 
streets of the Town except as authorized by a duly issued and currently 
valid ice cream vending permit obtained pursuant to this section. 

B. Terms. Ice cream vending permits may be issued only for the sale of 
ice cream, popsicles, ice sherbets, frozen desserts, and, as incidental 
thereto, other food items which are prepackaged by the manufacturer and 



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do not require further processing, such as gum, candy, juice, chips and 
soft drinks, from an ice cream truck. A permit shall be effective on the 
first day of January of the calendar year immediately following the date 
of issuance and shall remain in effect, unless sooner revoked, until 
December 3 1 of the same calendar year. Ice cream vending permits, or 
any rights or privileges thereunder, may not be assigned or transferred. 
Acceptance of a permit by the permittee shall constitute an agreement by 
such permittee that he has no property right in the permit, and that such 
permittee shall appear and defend, and indemnify and hold the Town, its 
officers and employees, harmless from and against any and all claims,- 
loss, damage or expense for any injury to or death of any person or 
persons, or for damage to property, resulting from, relating to, or arising 
out of any activity, act or omission of such permittee, or any of 
permittee's employees, agents, representatives or customers on the town 
streets. The Town and its elected and appointed officials and employees 
assume no responsibility for or regarding any goods sold or activities by 
any permittee, or any of permittee's employees, agents, representatives, 
contractors, or customers. 

C. Application. A person seeking an ice cream vending permit shall file 
a written application for such permit with the Chief of Police on a form 
provided by the Chief of Police. The application shall contain the 
following information: 

(1) Name, address and telephone number of the applicant; 

(2) A description and license number of the ice cream truck 
proposed to be used in the business; 

(3) An acknowledgment by the applicant that he agrees to be bound 
by all of the terms, conditions and provisions set forth in this section, 
and such additional terms and conditions as may be set forth in the 
permit; 

(4) Such other information as the Chief of Police may deem 
necessary to make a detennination on the application. 

D. Issuance. 

Prior to issuance of an ice cream vending permit, the applicant shall 
provide the Chief of Police with proof that the applicant, and each 
employee, agent, and representative thereof who will operate the ice 
cream truck, has been issued and is the holder of a currently valid license 
to operate a motor vehicle of such class in the State of Massachusetts, 
and that the-applicant is the holder of a State of Massachusetts Business 
License which is currently valid. 

E. Limitations. 

(1) The permit issued under this section shall be prominently 
displayed on the ice cream truck whenever it is being used for 
vending. No permittee, or any employee, agent or representative 



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thereof, shall operate an ice cream truck unless there is displayed on 
the ice cream truck a current State of Massachusetts Business 
License, a current State of Massachusetts Food Handling Permit if 
applicable, and the permittee's operation complies with all applicable 
local, state and federal health and sanitation requirements, and 
complies with all other applicable laws, ordinances and regulations. 

(2) Each permittee, and any employee, agent or representative 
thereof, shall insure that persons waiting to make purchases at the ice 
cream truck line up in single file on the side away from the traveled 
part of the street and in such a fashion as to create the least 
obstruction to pedestrian traffic. 

(3) Each permittee, and any employee, agent or representative 
thereof, shall vend only from the side of the ice cream truck away 
from moving traffic and as near as possible to the curb or side of the 
street. 

(4) No permittee, or any employee, agent or representative thereof, 
shall: 

(a) Vend unless such permittee, employee, agent or 
representative has a litter receptacle available for use by patrons, 
nor shall any permittee, or any employee, agent or representative 
thereof, leave any location without first picking up, removing 
and disposing of all trash or refuse remaining from sales made 
by such permittee, employee, agent or representative; 

(b) Vend unless the ice cream truck is fully stopped; 

(c) Vend to any person standing on the roadway side of the ice 
cream truck; 

(d) Back an ice cream truck to make or attempt to make a sale; 

(e) Vend from an ice cream truck stopped or parked on the 
roadway side of a vehicle stopped or parked at the edge or curb 
of a street or roadway; 

(f) Vend within less than fifty feet of any intersection; 

(g) Leave any ice cream truck unattended at any time when such 
vehicle is being used for vending upon a public street, provided, 
however, that such permittee may alight align to the street or 
sidewalk for the purpose of vending from the ice cream truck; 

(h) Make any sales within 1 ,500 feet of a restaurant, retail store 
selling prepackaged food items or a fixed place of business 
having a common victualler's license issued by the Town of 
Randolph unless a one-day permit is granted by the Police Chief; 

(i) Make any sales within 1,500 feet of any public school, 
unless a one-day permit is granted by the Police Chief; 

(j) Stop at any time for the purpose of making sales in any area 
where parking is prohibited by the Town of Randolph or in any 



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area posted as a "no parking zone" by the Randolph Pohce 
Department; 

(k) Stop at any time for the purpose of making sales for more 
than 10 minutes in a single location, unless a one-day permit is 
granted by the Police Chief; 

(1) Fail to operate four-way flashers when so stopped; 

(m) Stop for the purpose of making sales only between the hours 

of 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 a.m. 

(n) No one shall vend or sell their wares on any Town land 
within the Town of Randolph without first obtaining a 
vendors/stand cart permit. 
(5) An ice cream truck is subject to all local and state vehicle and 
traffic laws, ordinances and regulations applicable to other vehicles. 

F. Fees. 

The application fee shall be in accordance with the fee schedule, which fee 
shall be nonrefundable and payable at the time of filing of the application. 

G. Insurance. 

Each permittee shall maintain at all times during the entire term of the permit 
a current public liability insurance policy in an amount of not less than five 
hundred thousand dollars combined single limit, which policy shall name the 
Town as an additional named insured and contain a waiver of subrogation 
endorsement. The policy shall not contain any self insured retention or 
deductible in excess of one thousand dollars, and shall include a provision 
requiring that written notification be given to the Town by the insurance 
company not less than thirty days before the policy expires, or is cancelled, 
modified or terminated for any reason. Pemiittees shall submit a copy of the 
policy, or, at the option of the Town, a certificate of the policy, to the Town 
prior to beginning operations. 

H. Revocation. 

The Chief of Police may at any time revoke an ice cream vending permit for 
noncompliance with any term, condition or provision of the permit, for 
violation of any provision of this chapter or other applicable local, state or 
federal law, ordinance or regulation, or upon a determination that the 
operation of the permittee's ice cream truck is causing a hazard or a 
disruption of pedestrian or vehicular traffic, or for other reasons. The 
permittee shall be given written notice of the proposed revocation and an 
opportunity to be heard by the Chief of Police before revocation of the permit 
if so requested by such permittee not later than five days after the date of the 
written notice of proposed revocation. The permittee may appeal the decision 
of the Chief of Police to the Town Council by filing a written notice of 



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appeal with the Town Clerk not more than three days after the date of the 
decision being appealed. 

I. Fraud. 

Any person issued an ice cream vending permit under this chapter who 
commits any act of fraud, cheating or misrepresentation, whether through the 
permittee or through an employee, agent or representative thereof, while 
performing any activities provided for in the permit, direcdy or indirectly, or 
who shall barter, sell or peddle any goods upon the town streets other than 
those specified and authorized as provided in this chapter shall be guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished as provided in 
subsection 1 below. 



J. Penalty. 

Any person who violates any provision of this chapter shall be guilty of a 
misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be punished by a fme of not 
more than three hundred dollars. A separate offense shall be deemed 
committed on each day during which a violation occur or continues. 

Chapter 147 
PROPERTY MAINTENANCE 

§ 147-1. Landscaping defined. § 147-5. Excavations and hazardous conditions. 

§ 147-2. Requirements applicable to residential 

buildings. § 147-6. Maintenance of fencing and other 

barriers. 

§ 147-3. Weeds and grass. § 147-7. Parking. 

§ 147-4. Accumulations of earth material. § 147-8. Paving. 



[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 



GENERAL REFERENCES 
Abandoned vehicles - See Ch. 176. 



§ 147-1. Landscaping defined. [Amended 4-23-2001 ATM by Art. 13, 
approved 12-21-2001] 

Landscaping is defined as the finishing and adornment of unpaved yard 
areas. Materials and treatment generally include, but are not limited to, 
naturally growing elements such as grass, trees, shrubs, and flowers, and 
which may include the use of logs, rocks, fountains, water features and 
contouring of the earth. 

§ 147-2. Requirements applicable to Residential building(s) [Amended 4- 
23-2001 ATM by Art. 13, approved 12-21-2001] 

A. Landscaping is required in all front yards for all buildings and 
additions over 1,000 square feet. Said landscaping shall be 



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completed within one year from the date of occupancy of the building. 
Front yards required by this code shall be completely landscaped, except 
for those areas occupied by driveways, walls and paved walkways. All 
live landscaping required by this code shall be properly maintained. All 
dead or dying landscaping shall be replaced and all grass areas mowed 
on a regular basis. Enforcing authority shall be the Building 
Commissioner or Code Enforcement Officer. 

B. Landscaping is required in all street side side-yards for all buildings 
and additions over 1,000 square feet. Said landscaping shall be 
completed within one year from the date of occupancy of the building. 
All flanking street-side side yard shall be completely landscaped, except 
for those areas occupied by utilities, driveways, paved walks, and walls. 
All live landscaping required by this code shall be properly maintained. 
All dead or dying landscaping shall be replaced and all grass areas 
mowed on a regular basis. Enforcing authority shall be the Building 
Commissioner or Code Enforcement Officer. 
§ 147-3. Weeds and grass. 

The term, "weeds and grass," as used herein, shall mean and include all 
weeds, grasses, plants, bushes, poison oak, poison ivy, and other vegetation, 
except trees, ornamental shrubbery, flowers, garden vegetables, compost 
piles, or other plants or vegetables customarily planted and/or cultivated by 
farmers or gardeners. A general growth of "weeds and grass" in excess of 
twelve (12) inches is hereby declared to be a menace to public health and 
safety. 

A. It shall be unlawful for any owner, occupant, lessee, or agent in 
charge of land in the Town to permit "weeds and grass" to remain uncut 
and exceed a general height of twelve (12) inches. 

B. Upon the failure, refusal, or neglect of an owner, occupant, lessee, or 
agent to cut "weeds and grass" as required hereby, the Building 
Commissioner or other authorized officer or agent of the Town charged 
with the enforcement of the provisions of this article shall notify such 
owner, occupant, lessee, or agent of such condition and shall order such 
person to eliminate such "weeds and grass" within ten (10) days. Such 
order shall be in writing and may be served personally on, or sent by 
certified mail to, the owner of the property at the address shown on the 
assessment records of the Town. 

C. If said order is not complied with within said ten (10) day period, the 
Building Commissioner or other authorized officer or agent of the Town 
charged with the enforcement of the provisions of this article may cause 
the "weeds and grass" to be cut and removed, or may have such failure 
prosecuted as a violation of this Ordinance, or both. 

D. Whenever it shall be necessary for the Town to have the "weeds and 
grass" cut and removed, as above provided, the cost thereof shall 



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constitute a debt owed to the Town, and unless paid, the same shall be 
added to the personal property tax bill or real estate tax bill sent to the 
owner, and may thereafter be collected in the same manner as taxes are 
collected. 

E. Any person aggrieved by an order issued pursuant to the provisions 
of this Ordinance may file a written appeal to the Town Manager within 
ten ( 1 0) days from the date of such order, whereupon the Town Manager 
or his designee shall promptly thereafter, upon written notice, hold a 
hearing granting to such person the right and opportunity to show cause 
why he should not comply with the order. 

F. Fine. Any violation of this section of the ordinance shall be 
punishable by a penalty in accordance with the Fine Schedule. This 
chapter shall be enforced utilizing the non-criminal tickets and 
disposition mechanism of M.G.L c. 40 sec 21 D. 

§ 147-4. Accumulations of earth material. [Amended 6-17-2002 STM by 
Art. 2, approved 10-3-2002] 

Land which contains an accumulation of rock, stone, gravel, sand or other 
earth material above the surface of the ground in such a manner as to be 
dangerous to the property or person of anyone shall be deemed a nuisance 
and may be abated by the Town Manager in the following manner: 

A. Any individual, may initiate a petition to the Town Manager stating 
the nature of the nuisance complained of and apply for abatement 
thereof, whereupon the Town Manager, or their designee shall view the 
premises. If the Town Manager is of the opinion that the petition should 
be granted, it shall set a time and place for hearing, giving notice thereof 
to the petitioners, to the person whose land it may be necessary to enter 
upon to abate the nuisance and to any other person who may be damaged 
or benefited by the proceedings. Such notice shall be given in writing 
and may be served by any person authorized to serve civil process or by 
registered or certified mail. 

B. However, if the land is unoccupied and the owner or agent unknown 
or out of the commonwealth, the notice to such owner may be served by 
posting upon premises or by advertising in one or more newspapers in 
such manner as may be ordered. At the time and place appointed 
therefore, the Town Manager shall hear the parties and thereafter may 
cause such nuisance to be abated by entering upon any land and making 
such excavation as he shall deem necessary, and he shall also determine 
at whose expense the improvements shall be kept in repair and award the 
damage sustained by and benefits accruing to any person by reason of 
said improvement. The Town Manager shall forthwith give notice of its 
decision by filing with the Town Clerk and by mailing a copy, postage 
prepaid, to the owner of the premises and the petitioners, unless the 
petitioner is the Town itself The expense of making and keeping such 



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improvements in repair shall be assessed by the Assessors upon the 
person benefited thereby, as ascertained by said decision, and shall be 
included in his/her taxes. This shall be a lien upon the land benefited 
thereby and shall be collected in the same manner as other taxes upon 
land. 

C. A person who is aggrieved by the decision of said Town Manager 
may appeal there from to the Superior Court if, within seven days after 
the decision, he or she files the decision with the Superior Court, stating 
the grievance and action of the Town Manager thereon. 

§ 147-5. Excavations and hazardous conditions. [Amended 6-17-2002 

STM by Art. 2, approved 10-3-2002] 

An owner of land which has been excavated or constitutes a dangerous or 
hazardous condition shall erect barriers or take other suitable measures 
within five days after such owner has been notified in writing by the Town 
that such excavation or dangerous or hazardous condition constitutes a 
hazard to the public safety. Violation of this section shall be punishable in 
accordance with the Fine Schedule. 
§ 147-6. Maintenance of fencing and other barriers. 
Fences must be located entirely upon the private property of the person 
constructing or causing the construction of the fence, unless the property 
owner adjoining agrees in a written, notarized statement that a fence may be 
erected on the division line of both properties. Fences must be at least 12 
inches from a public sidewalk or street. 

A. Height 

(1) The front lot line - no fence shall exceed four (4) feet in height 

(2) Side and rear lot lines- no fence shall exceed six (6) feet in 
height 

B. Fence Construction 

(1) Front yards- Fences shall be constructed with boards, chain link 
construction, or other suitable material firmly connected to posts 
sunk in the soil at least two feet or more as necessary to properly 
support the fence. All fences abutting the front yard shall provide a 
clear view into the yard from the street. No pickets or posts shall be 
located closer than four (4) inches to each other. 

(2) Fences for rear and side yard- Fences shall be constructed with 
boards, chain link construction, or other suitable material firmly 
connected to posts sunk in the soil at least two feet or more as 
necessary to properly support the fence. 



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G. All new fence installations shall be erected with the smooth side 
facing outward; all posts shall be located on the inside of the fence. 
Painted fences shall be of one (1) color, which is compatible with the 
color of the home located on the parcel. 

H. No fence shall be constructed, maintained, or placed on any property 
in the Town of Randolph of metal construction or otherwise, which is 
charged or connected with an electrical current in such manner as to 
transmit said current to persons, animals, or things which intentionally or 
unintentionally might come in contact with it; with the exemption for 
agricultural uses. Barbed wire is prohibited in the Town of Randolph 
except as permitted by the Board of Zoning Appeals on approved 
protective measures fences. 

I. A dilapidated fence is any fence in an improper state of repair that 
causes a safety or heath concern. It includes any fencing that, by its age 
or deteriorating condition, lists, leans, buckles or is broken or has 
exposed pieces projecting, protruding or laying in a manner which could 
fall or be hazardous to persons walking or driving along public property 
including street or right of way or public easements; fencing that by 
improper position on or near the ground is situated in such a manner as to 
offer harborage to vermin; fencing that is damaged by animals or by 
other means such that the fence condition is unsafe and deleterious to the 
livability of the neighborhood; any eight foot section of a fence that is 
more than fifteen degrees out of vertical alignment or that has ten percent 
of its pickets or structural components either damaged, missing or rotted. 
Any fence considered a dilapidated structure must be repaired or 
replaced. 

J. Repairs to a fence with broken, missing, warped, or otherwise 
damaged materials or hardware must be repaired and aligned to the 
property boundaries. Any repairs must match existing fence style in the 
same material, at the same height, and the same location as the original 
fence. A damaged fence must be repaired within 30 days of the date the 
damage occurred. 

K. It is unlawful to obstruct the view of motorists at intersections with a 
fence, shrubbery or other vegetation, sign boards, structure of any 
description, uncontrolled weeds, etc. Any plantings on comer lots must 
permit an unobstructed view along intersecting streets for motorists and 
pedestrians approaching the intersection. 

L. Violation and Penahies. Any person violating or failing to comply 
with the provisions of this ordinance shall be subject to a fine in 



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accordance with the fine schedule and responsible for a civil infraction. 
Each day a violation continues shall be deemed a separate offense. 
§ 147-7. Parking. 

No person shall park any vehicle on any grass area of the front yard setback 
in any district unless that vehicle shall be parked on an approved driveway or 
parking area approved by the Town. 
§ 147-8. Paving. 

A. No person shall allow any pavement to be placed on any property 
within the Town of Randolph without first obtaining a permit. 

B. No person shall be allowed to pave their front yard setback of any 
residential used property except for a 20' wide driveway. 

Chapter 151 
QUARRIES 

§ 151-1. Safeguards; posting of premises. § 151-2. Violations and penalties. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

§ 151-1. Safeguards; posting of premises. All owners, lessees, operators, 
managers, persons or corporations having control of any sand bank, pit or 
quarry within the Town which, in the judgment of the Town Council, 
constitutes or contains a hazard are hereby ordered, directed and required to 
erect and maintain a suitable safeguard around such excavated areas being or 
formerly used as a sand bank, pit or quarry, except through gates therein, said 
safeguard to be in the form of a fence at least six feet in height of steel wire 
mesh or other construction approved by the Town Building Commissioner 
and/or local inspector adequate for the purposes above named, and they are 
further ordered, directed and required to keep the gates in said fence locked 
at all times, except during business hours, and they are further ordered, 
directed and required to keep said premises posted against trespassers, said 
signs to contain adequate notice that trespassers will be dealt with according 
to law. 

§ 151-2. Violations and penalties. 

Any person or persons, association or corporation violating this chapter or 
any section or provision thereof, or refusing or neglecting to comply with the 
provisions thereof, shall be found to be in violation, which shall be 
punishable by a fine in accordance with the Fine Schedule for each violation. 
When a violation of this chapter is continuous, each 24 hours thereof shall 
constitute a separate and distinct offense and violation. 



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Chapter 157 
SALES 

ARTICLE I YARD SALES § 157-4. Violations and penalties. 

§ 157-1. Definitions. ARTICLE II SALES BY NON-OWNERS 

§ 157-2. Restrictions. § 157-5. Permission of property owner 

required; registration. 

§ 157-3. Written permission required. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

ARTICLE I 
Yard Sales 

§ 157-1. Definitions. 

As used in this article, the following terms shall have the meanings indicated: 
YARD SALE - The sale or offering for sale of 10 or more items of personal 
property at any one residential premises at any one time, excluding such sales 
as may be conducted by a bona fide charitable organization, religious or 
fraternal society or other tax-exempt organization. 
§ 157-2. Restrictions. 

Unless specific written authorization is given by the Police Department, not 
more than three such sales shall be held on any one residential premises in 
each calendar year, and any such sale shall not continue for more than two 
consecutive days. Yard sales shall not be conducted before 8:00 a.m. or after 
sunset. 

§ 157-3. Written permission required. 

As a condition precedent to any such sale, written permission for the holding 
of said sale must be secured from the Police Department at least three days 
prior thereto. 

§ 157-4. Violations and penalties. 

Any person violating any of the provisions of this article shall be punished by 
a fme in accordance with the Fine Schedule for each offense. Each day that a 
violation hereof exists shall be deemed a separate offense. 

ARTICLE II 
Sales by Non-owners 
§ 157-5. Permission of property owner required; registration. In a 

business district, no product shall be displayed or offered for sale by a non- 
owner or non-tenant of the building or lot, except by permission of the owner 
of the property and the registration of said operation with the Town Council. 
The registration shall include a copy of the written permission by the owner, 
together with a bond or other surety in an amount as set by said Town 
Council. 



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Chapter 161 
SEWERS AND DRAINAGE 



§ 161-1. Drains and conduits. 



§ 161-3. Subdivisions without public sewerage. 



§ 161-2. Grass and trash racks. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

GENERAL REFERENCES 
Streets and sidewalks - See Ch. 166. Water - See Ch. 192. 

§ 161-1. Drains and conduits. 

No person shall construct or maintain any drain or conduit from any house, 
shop or other building, or from any vault, cesspool or cistern, to or upon any 
street or way so as to discharge water or other matter in or upon any such 
street or way, except when permitted in writing so to do by the Department 
of Public Works, under a penalty in accordance with the Fine Schedule. 
§ 161-2. Grass and trash racks. 

No person shall remove, damage, destroy or cause to be injured a grass and 
trash rack at or near any culvert maintained by the state or Town, under 
penalty in accordance with the Fine Schedule. 
§ 161-3. Subdivisions without public sewerage. 

There shall be no subdivisions or buildings constructed that use water or 
produce sewerage within the Town without being connected to Town 
sewerage. Where public sewerage is not available, drainage work shall be 
completed and approved by the Planning Board prior to the conducting of 
soil and percolation tests on any lot therein. 



[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 Annual Town Meeting, Art. 8, approved 
10-27-1995. Amendments noted where applicable.] 

GENERAL REFERENCES 
Sewers and drainage - See Ch. 161. Vehicles and traffic - See Ch. 179. 

§ 166-1. Obstructions. 

No person shall: 



Chapter 166 
STREETS AND SIDEWALKS 



§ 166-1. Obstructions. 

§ 166-1.1 Roadside memorials. 

§ 166-2. Construction and demolition debris. 

§ 166-3. Coasting. 



§ 166-5. Breaking ground; trees and structures. 

§ 166-6. Driveways. 

§ 166-7. Numbering of buildings. 

§ 166-8. Removal of poles, wires and overhead 

structures. 

§ 166-9. Shopping carts. 



§ 166-4. Awnings and signs. 



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A. Place or cause to be placed, in any public place, street or private way 
or in any running stream or body of water, any dirt, rubbish, wood, 
timber or other materials tending to cause obstruction, or deposit 
garbage, carrion, filth or offal, except in such places as shall be permitted 
by the Board of Health, under a penalty. [Amended 5-14-2001 ATM by 
Art. 85, approved 7-24 2001] 

B. Place leaves or cause leaves to be placed, by raking, onto any public 
way. No person engaged in the removal of snow shall, under any 
circumstances, cause said snow to be deposited so as to obstruct any 
public way or sidewalk. [Amended 4-26-2004 ATM by Art. 6, approved 
7-20-2004] 

C. Pasture or tether any animal in any street in the Town in such a 
manner as to obstruct the street or sidewalk. 

D. Obstruct the free, open and convenient use of any sidewalk, for 
travel by the public, by occupying the same with goods, wares, 
merchandise or other chattels or by trucks unloading merchandise or by 
using the same as a place of resort, amusement, recreation or business. 

E. Use or occupy part of a public street or sidewalk for the purchase, 
sale, storage or display of merchandise or other articles except by license 
of the Town Council. 

F. Deliver, place or cause to be delivered or placed, upon any sidewalk 
in this Town, any coal, truck, bale, box, crate, barrel, package, bundle or 
any other article or thing so as to obstruct the free, open and convenient 
use of such sidewalk or any part thereof for more than 30 minutes at one 
time or for more than 10 minutes at one time after being notified to 
remove such obstruction by a police officer. 

G. Cause any equipment or piece of machinery to be placed on or cross 
a curbing or sidewalk without prior approval of the Department of Public 
Works. Failure to do so will result in a fine in accordance with the Fine 
Schedule, and said person shall be obligated to repair the damage. 

H. Any person removing or clearing snow whether by snow plowing, 
snow blowing, shoveling or any other kind of snow removal, whether 
mechanical or manual, who deposits or leaves snow so removed in a 
public way, whether or not such snow deposits physically obstruct the 
flow of traffic on such public ways, shall be punished by a fine in 
accordance with the Fine Schedule. [Added 4-26-2004 ATM by Art. 6, 
approved 7-20-2004] 

I. Each of the foregoing sections of this section 166-1 ordinance may 
be enforced by any police officer, using the non-criminal ticketing 
disposition process of section 1-6 of the General ordinances of the Town. 
[Added 4-26-2004 ATM by Art. 6, approved 7-20-2004] 

J. Each of the foregoing sections of this section 166-1 ordinance shall 
be punishable by a fine in accordance with the Fine Schedule. 



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§ 166-1.1 Roadside Memorials. 

A. For the purposes of this §166-1.1, the term "roadside memoriar 
shall be defined as any items, including without limitation balloons, 
flowers, pictures, stuffed animals and religious items, placed within the 
right of way of a public way, street, sidewalk, walkway or way 
maintained and used as a public way, at or near the site of a non-fatal or 
fatal accident or occurrence. 

B. Roadside memorials pose public safety hazards by creating 
distractions for the motoring public and interfering with the flow of 
pedestrian and motor vehicle traffic. 

C. Roadside memorials hinder proper maintenance of the public right of 
way. 

D. Because of the temporary nature of roadside memorials, it is 
expressly found that after a short time the person or persons who have 
placed roadside memorials have intentionally abandoned them. 

E. ' No roadside memorial shall be left on or within the right of way of a 
public way, street, sidewalk, walkway or way maintained and used as a 
pubhc way for more than thirty (30) days. 

F. The Superintendent of the Department of Public Works shall cause 
to be removed and discarded any roadside memorial left within the right 
of way of a public way, street, sidewalk, walkway or way maintained and 
used as a public way for more than fifteen (15) days. 

§ 166-2. Construction and demolition debris. 

Any person who intends to erect, alter, repair or take down any building or 
part thereof on land abutting on any street or public place in this Town and 
who desires to make use of such street or place for the purpose of placing 
thereon building materials or rubbish shall give notice thereof to the Police 
Department. Thereupon, the Police Department may grant a permit to occupy 
such a portion thereof to be used for such purposes as in their judgment the 
necessity of the case demands and the security of the public allows, such 
permit to run for not longer than 60 days and to be on such conditions, and 
by fiimishing such security, by bond or otherwise, for the observance and 
performance of the conditions and for the protection of the Town, as the 
Department of Public Works may require, and especially, in every case, upon 
condition that during the whole of every night, from sunset in the evening 
until sunrise in the morning, proper lights shall be so placed as to effectively 
secure all travelers from liability to injury. Such pennit may be renewed at 
the discretion of the Police Department. 
§ 166-3. Coasting. 

A. No person shall coast upon any sidewalk in the Town, nor shall any 
person coast upon any of the public ways of the Town except upon such 
street as the Town Council may designate each year by public notice. 



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B. Said streets may be protected by barriers, and any unauthorized 
person or persons moving such barriers shall be subject to a fme in 
accordance with the Fine Schedule for each offense. 
§ 166-4. Awnings and signs. 

No person shall place, over any sidewalk, any awning, shade or signboard 
less than seven feet from the ground at the lowest part or construct or 
maintain any awning, shade or signboard extending beyond the line of the 
sidewalk, and for any offense against this section an offender shall pay a fme 
in accordance with the Fine Schedule. 
§ 166-5. Breaking ground; trees and structures. 

No person shall break or dig up or aid in breaking or digging up the ground 
in any street or square in the Town or set up any post, fence, tree or edge 
stone in any street or square in the Town without a permit from the Town 
Manager under a penalty in accordance with the Fine Schedule for such 
offense. 

§ 166-6. Driveways. 

No driveway shall be located within five feet of a hydrant, utility pole or 
catch basin. 

§ 166-7. Numbering of buildings. [Added 4-16-1996 ATM by Art. 6, 1 
approved 7-29-1996] 

A. It shall be the duty of the Town Engineer to assign a number to all 
buildings on the streets of the Town. 

B. The Town Engineer shall prepare and keep on file in his or her office 
a plan showing the streets and the location of all numbered lots in the 
Town. Such numbers shall cover a frontage from 50 feet or more, at the 
discretion of the Engineer, measuring from end to end of the street. 
Whenever one number shall be insufficient to particularly designate 
additional tenements or buildings on the premises comprised within a 
given frontage to such additional tenement or buildings shall be assigned, 
in conjunction with the usual and proper number, the letters of the 
alphabet, in their order, one letter to each such additional tenement or 
building. 

C. The odd numbers shall be placed on the right hand side and the even 
numbers on the left hand side of all streets following the direction of the 
numerical order from the beginning. 

D. The owner and occupant of every tenement and building situated on 
any street in the Town shall cause to be placed and maintained on or over 
the outside doors fronting the street or on front comers of every tenement 
or building having their entrances on the side thereof such number or 
numbers, letter or letters as may be assigned thereto by the Town 
Engineer under any of the provisions of this section, such number or 
letter not to be less than two inches in height and to be placed so as to be 
easily observed from the street in front of the premises. 



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E. If the owner or occupant of any tenement or building fails to number 
the same in accordance with the provisions of this section, it shall be the 
duty of the Town Engineer to place the proper number or numbers, letter 
or letters thereon, and the cost thereof may be assessed upon such owner 
or occupant. 

F. Whoever shall refuse or neglect to comply with the provisions of this 
section within 30 days after a notice in writing delivered to the owner or 
occupant of such tenement or building of the number or numbers, letter 
or letters, so assigned by the Town Engineer shall, for each and every 
offense, be subject to the penalty in accordance with the Fine Schedule 
for each day that it is not done for each offense. | 

§ 166-8. Removal of poles, wires and overhead structures. 

A. Any person, firm, corporation, partnership, their agents and 
employees, who has been granted, or may be granted, any license, 
permission, or other authority to construct or to maintain poles and 
overhead wires and associated overhead structures upon, along, under or 
across any public ways, is forbidden from installing or constructing, and 
shall remove immediately any poles, overhead wires and associated 
overhead structures which are located on, along, or across the following 
section of roadway described below, and in connection with or related to 
such removal or the provision of underground replacement facilities, 
shall install all underground construction and conduits, conductors and 
associated equipment necessary to provide and receive utility service 
between the service facilities in the building or structure being served 
and that portion of the conduits, conductors and associated equipment 
required to be furnished by it under its applicable rules, regulations and 
tariffs: 

South Main Street Northerly from Pole 9 to Crawford Square 

North Street Easterly from Crawford Square to Pole 5 Short Street 

North Main Street Easterly on Short Street, Poles 1 through 5 

North Main Street Northerly from Crawford Square to Pole 20121 at the 

bridge 

North Main Street Northerly from the bridge to Pole 28 at West Street 
North Main Street Northerly from West Comers to Pole 130 at Oliver 
Street 

Warren Street Westerly from North Main Street to Pole 8 at the 
intersection of Highland Avenue 

Highland Avenue Southerly from Warren Street to Pole 8 at Memorial 
Parkway 

Memorial Parkway Easterly from Highland Avenue to Pole 3 at North 
Main Street 

Union Street Northerly from Pole 3 to Crawford Square [Added 4-25- 
2005 ATM by Art. 6, approved 10-18-2005] 



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B. All new subdivisions consisting of two (2) or more dwellings shall 

be required to provide underground utilities. 
§ 166-9. Shopping carts. [Added 4-25-2005 ATM by Art. 7, approved 10- 
18-2005] 

A. Purpose. This Section 166-9 requires Business Establishments using 
Shopping Carts or similar devices shall install and maintain a system to 
retain the Shopping Carts within the property boundaries of the Business 
Establishment. The Building Inspector and the Director of Public Works 
Department are authorized to implement and enforce these sections. 

B. Defmitions. Unless specifically indicated otherwise, these definitions 
shall apply and control in this Section 166-9. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR - The Town's duly appointed building inspector or 
his/her designee or agent. 

BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENT - Includes but is not limited to a grocery 
store, supermarket, drugstore, pharmacy, department store, discount store, 
variety store, or other retail establishment which supplies Shopping Carts for 
the use of its customers. 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS - The Director of the Public Works 

Department or his/her designee or agent. 

DPW - The Department of Public Works or its successor. 

OWNER - The owner of a Business Establishment if it is owner-operated or 

the manager of a Business Establishment if it is not owner-operated. 

PARKING LOT - Any parcel of land owned, leased, or other wise under the 

direction and control of the Owner and used for parking motor vehicles 

related to the daily operations of the Business Establishment and shall 

include the areas of ingress and egress. 

PERMANENT IDENTITY TAG - A tag, label, plate, or other form of 
identification that is affixed to a Shopping Cart and designed to be 
removed/removable only by the Business Establishment. The Permanent 
Identity Tag shall state the name of the Business Establishment, the address 
of the Business Establishment, and the telephone number of the Business 
Establishment. The name, address, and telephone number on the permanent 
Identity Tag shall be of the neighborhood Business Establishment rather than 
a state, regional, or national headquarters, except that Business 
Establishments using a total of more than 350 Shopping carts at more than 
two locations within the Town of Randolph (the "Town") may place a central 
telephone number on the Permanent Identity Tag as long as that telephone 
number is within the Town's area code. 

SHOPPING CART OR CART - Includes but is not limited to that type of 
mobile vehicle used for transportation and portage by human propulsion of 
goods or merchandise in and about markets, stores, shopping centers, malls, 
and other Business Establishments. 

C. On-site retention. 



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(1) Each and every Shopping Cart used by a Business Estabhshment 
shall have affixed thereto a Permanent Identity Tag. A first violation 
of this section shall be subject to a warning, and each subsequent 
violation of this section shall be subject to a fine in accordance with 
the Fine Schedule. Each cart not in compliance with this subsection 
shall be considered a separate violation. 

(2) Each and every Business Establishment shall implement and 
maintain system to retain all shopping Carts within the property 
boundaries of the Business Establishment including Parking Lot. The 
Business Establishment shall provide signage in a conspicuous 
location in the premises which clearly notifies Shopping Cart users 
of the specific retention system in place and how the retention 
system operates. 

(3) Each method included in this subsection shall be considered to 
be an example of an on-site retention method complying with these 
sections. If the Business Establishment has a method for retention 
that is not delineated as an example herein, then an Owner may 
submit a plan to the Building Inspector that satisfies the intent of 
these sections to retain Shopping Carts on the premises of the 
Business Establishment and/or its Parking Lot or to ensure the 
immediate retrieval of Shopping Carts outside of the Business 
Establishment and/or its Parking Lot; no plan submitted by an Owner 
to the Building Inspector shall be valid until approved in writing by 
the Building Inspector. Examples of methods and/or plans are as 
follows: 

(a) A physical barrier, such as bollards, restricting Shopping 
Carts to a portion of the exterior of the Business Establishment, 
but physical barriers shall not interfere with fire lanes, handicap 
access, or similar building features; 

(b) A protruding vertical arm, or other similar or similarly- 
functioning device, attached to the Cart which prevents the Cart 
from being removed from the interior of the Business 
Establishment. 

(c) A system, which may be mechanical in nature, requiring the 
Cart user to remit collateral, including but not limited to a 
returnable monetary deposit to use a Shopping Cart; the 
collateral shall be reasonable in scope and shall not unreasonably 
deter the use of the Cart but instead encourage the user's return 
of the Cart the collateral shall be returned to the user upon the 
user's return of the Cart. 

(d) A wheel-locking mechanism installed in the Cart that is 
commonly used in conjunction with an electronic barrier along 
the perimeter of a Business Establishment and which mechanism 



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is activated upon the Cart's approach or passing through the 
electronic barrier; 

(e) An attendant or attendants whose sole responsibility is to 
manage and/or return the Business Establishment's Shopping 
Carts from the exterior premises of the Business Establishment 
and areas immediately adjacent thereto to the interior premises 
of the Business Establishment or another exterior area of the 
Business Establishment dedicated to the containment of 
Shopping Carts; 

(f) Other similar methods or plans submitted by an Owner for 
the approval of the Building Inspector which would satisfy the 
intent of these sections to retain Shopping Carts on the premises 
of the Business establishment and/or its Parking Lot or to ensure 
the immediate retrieval of Shopping Carts outside of the 
Business Establishment and/or its Parking Lot. 

(4) No Business Establishment shall allow Shopping Carts to 
congregate or "stack up" in such a manner as to impede ingress to or 
egress from the Business Establishment or any public or private way 
adjacent to the Business Establishment. 

(5) Prior to the close of each business day, every Business 
Establishment shall collect and secure its Shopping Carts on its 
premises, including its Parking Lot. This action shall be commenced 
no sooner than 1 5 minutes prior to the close of each business day. 

D. Removal of shopping carts: 

(1) Any unattended Shopping Cart found outside the perimeter of a 
Business Establishment or its Parking Lot may be removed and 
impounded by the Department of Public Works, the Building 
Inspector, or an agent thereof. The enforcement personnel removing 
the Cart shall make a written report that identifies himself/herself as 
well as the date, time, and location of the Cart at time of the removal; 
this report may take the form of a tag attached to the Cart; a copy of 
the report shall be immediately forwarded to the Building Inspector. 

(2) Within a reasonable time but not more than three business days 
after removal, the Building Inspector shall notify the Owner of the 
removed Cart using the infonnation provided on the Permanent 
Identity Tag attached. If the Cart does not have a Permanent Identity 
Tag then the Building Inspector may attempt to notify the Owner of 
the removed Cart if the identity of the Owner is known or reasonably 
discernible. Any notification of removed and impounded Shopping 
Carts shall be made in writing and shall include the date of removal, 
the location of removal, and the process for the Owner's retrieval of 
the Cart. 



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(3) Any Cart that does not have the Permanent Identity Tag attached ; 
and which is removed pursuant to these sections is deemed to be ' 
abandoned property and the Building Inspector may sell any such 
Cart at public auction and the proceeds shall inure to the Town, or 
destroy or otherwise dispose of any such Cart. 

(4) No person shall remove a Shopping Cart from the Business 
Establishment without the express written authorization of the 
Business Establishment. Any person that removes a Shopping Cart 
from a Business Establishment without the express written 
authorization of the Business Establishment, although subject to the 
criminal penalties in M.G.L. c.266, s. 30A, shall also be subject to a 
civil fme in accordance with the Fine Schedule. The Town's Police 
Department shall have non-exclusive authority to enforce this 
subsection. 

E. Retrieval of shopping carts. 
. (1) An Owner or an Owner's agent may retrieve a Shopping Cart 
removed pursuant to Section 166-9.D. by appearing during normal 
business hours at the location stated in the notice required under 
Section 166-9.D.(2) and by paying (i.) a fee for the removal of the 
Cart(s) in accordance with the Fine Schedule. 

(2) The obligation of the Building Inspector to release a Shopping 
Cart continues only as follows: 

(a) If no hearing in accordance with Section 166-9.F. has been 
timely and properly requested and the Cart has not been retrieved 
then the obligation of the Building Inspector extends only 30 
calendar days after notice of removal has been mailed; 

(b) If a hearing in accordance with Section 166-9.F. has been 
timely and properly requested then the obligation of the Building 
Inspector extends only 15 calendar days after a notice of decision 
of the Building Inspector has been made in accordance with 
section 166-9. 

(3) Any Shopping Cart that has not been retrieved by an Owner 
within the time periods contained in this section shall be deemed to 
be permanently abandoned, and the building Inspector may, in said 
his/her sole discretion, (i) continue to release such Carts to the 
Owner in accordance with Section 166-9.E., (ii) sell such Carts at 
public auction and the proceeds shall inure to the Town, or (iii) 
destroy or otherwise dispose of such Carts. 

(4) An Owner that does not retrieve a Cart and that has not 
petitioned for a hearing may be subject to additional fines and/or fees 
which may include a fee to dispose of the Cart of in accordance with 
the Fee Schedule. 



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F. Fines. 

Unless otherwise specified in these sections, a violation of this Section 166-9 
may be subject to the issuance of a warning for a first offense, a fine in 
accordance with the Fine Schedule Any fines and/or fees that remain unpaid 
by an Owner for more than 12 months may become liens against the real 
estate of the Business Establishment. The provisions of M.G.L. c.40, s. 21D 
may be used to enforce these sections. 

G. Appeal. 

(1) An Owner who has incurred a Shopping Cart-related warning 
and/or fee under these sections may obtain a hearing regarding the 
propriety of the warning and/or fee by making written petition to the 
Building Inspector for a hearing within 1 5 calendar days of receipt of 
the notice of removal pursuant to Section 166-9.D.(2). The Building 
Inspector shall provide written notice to the Owner of the date, time, 
and location of the hearing, and the hearing shall be held within 30 
calendar days from the date of the hearing request. 

(2) The Town Manager or his designee shall act as the hearing 
officer and the decision resulting therefrom shall be final and subject 
only to judicial review. 

(3) The Town Manager shall notify the Owner of the decision in 
writing within 30 calendar days of the hearing. 

(4) Proceedings for review of the decision of the Building Inspector 
may be instituted in any court of competent jurisdiction within the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The commencement of an action 
shall not operate as a stay of enforcement of said Building 
Inspector's decision, but the Building Inspector, at his/her discretion, 
may stay enforcement; the reviewing court may order a stay upon 
such terms as it considers proper as prescribed by M.G.L. c. 30A, s. 
14. 

H. Permits. 

The Town may withhold the issuance of any permit if the applicant therefore 
is an Owner, or is acting on behalf of an Owner, of a Business Establishment 
that has an uncorrected violation and/or amounts due for an unpaid fine or an 
unpaid fee. 

I. Stolen property. 

In their efforts to enforce the provisions of these sections, nothing in these 
sections shall be construed to prohibit, encumber, or impede DPW or the 
Building Inspector from reporting a discovery of stolen property to the 
Town's Police Department. 

J. Regulatory authority. 
The DPW Superintendent shall have the authority to promulgate rules and 
regulations necessary to implement and enforce these sections. The failure to 



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promulgate such rules and regulations shall not affect the enforceability of 
this Section 166-9. 
K. Effective date. 

Enforcement of fines, fees, and/or other penalties shall not be authorized 
until six months from time passage. 
L. Severability. 

If any provision of these sections shall be held to be invalid by a court of 
competent jurisdiction, then such provision shall be considered separately 
and apart from the remaining provisions, which shall remain in full force and 
effect. 

Chapter 176 
VEHICLES, JUNK AND UNREGISTERED 

§ 176-1. Junk vehicles/parts. § 176-5. Identification. 

§ 176-2. Unregistered vehicles/trailers. § 176-6. Enforcement. 

§ 176-3. Abandonment. § 176-7. Fine. 

§ 176-4. Public way. § 176.8. Liens. 

1. Editor's Note: This article also repealed former Ch. 176, Vehicles, 
Abandoned, adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 

[HISTORY: Adopted by Order No. 2010-16, approved by Town Council 
Sept. 13, 2010 

§176-1. Junk Vehicles/Parts. 

No Person, as owner or as one in control of a premises or property within the 
town, whether as owner, tenant, occupant, lessee, registered owner, or titled 
bill of sale owner, shall keep or allow to be kept any partially dismantled, 
non-operating, wrecked, junked or discarded, vehicle, trailer or parts thereof 
to remain in the open on such property longer than seventy -two (72) hours, 
except that this section shall not apply to any property that is duly licensed 
for such. 

The vehicle, trailer or parts thereof shall be removed within seventy-two (72) 
hours after notification or it shall be fined and impounded with any and all 
charges incurred to be borne entirely by the lawftil owner of the property 
from which it was removed. 

No person shall cause any item in this section to be stored or confined in a 
non-permanent (without a foundation) enclosure that has not been duly 
permitted by the State Building Code and the Town's Building 
Commissioner. 

§176-2. Unregistered Vehicles/Trailers. 

No person, as owner or as one in control of a premises or property within the 
Town, whether as owner, tenant, occupant, lessee, registered owner, or titled 
bill of sale owner, shall keep or allow to be kept more than one unregistered 



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vehicle/trailer to remain in the open on such property longer than seventy- 
two (72) hours, except that this section shall not apply to any property that is 
duly licensed for such. 

The vehicle/trailer shall be removed within seventy-two (72) hours after 
notification or it shall be impounded with any and all charges incurred to be 
borne entirely by the lawful owner of the property from which it was 
removed, or in the case of public property from the rightful owner of the 
removed item. 

No person shall cause any item in this section to be stored or confined in a 
non-permanent (without a foundation) enclosure that has not been duly 
permitted by the State Building Code and the Town's Building 
Commissioner. 
§176-3. Abandonment. 

No person shall abandon a motor vehicle/trailer so that it blocks a public 
way, private driveway, or creates a hazard for any length of time. 
§176-4. Public Way. 

No person shall allow an unregistered and/or uninsured vehicle/trailer upon a 
public way for any length of time. 
§176-5. Identification. 

In the event of no license plate on a vehicle, the vehicle identification 
number (VIN) shall be used. 
§176-6. Enforcement. 

The above sections shall be enforced by the Randolph Police Department 
under the direction of the Chief of Police. The Police Chief shall be the 
authority to formulate rules and regulations for the disposal of any 
vehicle/trailer or parts thereof that have not been claimed and whose 
penalties have not been paid. 

Note: The Building Commissioner is the enforcement agent for all building 

violations. 

§176-7. Fine. 

Violators shall have their vehicle/trailer tagged with a violation notice and 
fined Fifty Dollars ($50.00). in accordance with the Fine Schedule. Each day 
such violation is committed or permitted to continue shall constitute a 
separate offense, and shall be punishable as such hereunder. 
176-8. Lien. 

Any fine or penalty imposed by this section and not paid shall become a 
municipal charge under the lien created by M.G.L c. 40, s. 58. 



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Chapter 179 
VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC 

§ 179-1. Backing onto state highways. § 179-4. Preemptors for signal lights. 

§ 179-2. Warning devices on vehicles and equipment. § 179-5. Bicycles. 

§ 179-3. Parking fines. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

GENERAL REFERENCES 

Abandoned vehicles - See Ch. 176. Storage of vehicles - See Ch. 185. 

Removal of vehicles - See Ch. 182. 

§ 179-1. Backing onto state highways. 

A. In all districts abutting a state highway, no building shall be 
constructed so that it is necessary for a car to enter said highway from the 
available parking by backing a motor vehicle onto said highway. Before 
any building permit is issued to said building, the State Department of 
Transportation shall be notified in advance for its recommendations as to 
access and egress to and from the state highway. 

B. In all districts abutting a state highway, no person shall enter the 
same by backing a motor vehicle from the adjoining property into said 
highway. 

§ 179-2. Warning devices on vehicles/equipment. 

All Town-owned vehicles/equipment, all Town-hired vehicles/equipment and 
all commercial vehicles/equipment over 10,000 gvw doing work on Town 
projects or projects under inspection or supervision of Town officials shall be 
equipped with an audible warning device or alarm which will be set off 
automatically whenever said above vehicles/equipment back up. 
§ 179-3. Parking fines. 

Fines now appear in the Fine Schedule, Chapter 301. 

§ 179-4. Preemptors for signal lights. [Added 11-13-1996 STM by Art. 
35, approved 3-13-1997] 

Whenever new traffic signal lights are installed or renovations of existing 
traffic signal lights are proposed, preemptors for the Randolph Fire 
Department in connection with such signal lights shall be installed. 
§ 179-5. Bicycles. 

A. Every person operating a bicycle upon a way, as defined in M.G.L c. 
90 s. 1, shall have the right to use all public ways in the Commonwealth 
except limited access or express state highways where signs specifically 
prohibiting bicycles have been posted, and shall be subject to the traffic 
laws and regulations of the Commonwealth and the special regulations 
contained in this section except that: 

(1) The bicycle operator may keep to the right when passing a motor 
vehicle that is moving in the travel lane of the way 



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(2) The bicycle operator shall signal by either hand his intention to 
stop or turn 

(3) Bicycles may be ridden on sidewalks outside business districts 
when necessary in the interest of public safety, a person operating a 
bicycle on the sidewalk shall yield the right of way to pedestrians 
and give an audible signal before overtaking and passing any 
pedestrian. 

B. Operators of bicycles shall be subject to the following regulations: 

(1) The operator shall not ride more than 2 abreast, but with more 
than 1 lane in the direction of travel, ride single file except when 
passing. 

(2) The operator shall ride only upon or astride a permanent and 
regular seat attached to the bicycle; a passenger shall ride only upon 
or astride a permanent and regular seat attached to the bicycle or to a 
trailer towed by the bicycle. 

(a) The operator shall not transport another person between the 
ages of one and four years, or weighing forty pounds or lesson a 
bicycle except:- In a "baby seat" attached to the bicycle, with up 
right seating, a secure seat harness and some form of protection 
that keeps feet and hands from hitting the spokes of the wheels 
of the bicycle.- Upon or astride a seat of a tandem bicycle 
equipped so that the other person can comfortably reach the 
handlebars and pedals. 

Note: The operator shall not transport anyone under the age of 
one. 

(b) Any person sixteen years of age or younger operating a 
bicycle or being carried as a passenger on a bicycle on a public 
way, bicycle path or on any other public right-of-way shall wear 
a helmet. The helmet shall: 

- Fit the person's head and be secured by straps. 

- Meet standards established by the United States Consumer 
Product Safety Commission. 

Note: These requirements shall not apply if the passenger is in an 
enclosed trailer or other device that adequately holds the 
passenger in place and protects the passenger's head from impact 
in an accident. 

(c) A violation of clause (a) or (b) shall not be used as evidence 
of contributory negligence in any civil actions. 

(3) The operator shall give an audible warning whenever necessary 
to insure safe operation of the bicycle; provided, however, the use of 
a siren or whisde is prohibited. 

(4) The operator shall park his bicycle upon a way or sidewalk in 
such a manner as not to obstruct vehicular or pedestrian traffic. 



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(5) The operator shall not permit the bicycle to be drawn by any 
other moving vehicle. The operator shall not tow any other vehicle 
or person, except that bicycle trailers properly attached to the bicycle 
that allow for firm control and braking may be used. 

(6) The operator shall not carry any package, bundle or article 
except in or on a basket, rack, trailer or other device designed for 
such purposes. The operator shall keep at least one hand upon the 
handlebars at all times. 

(7) Every bicycle operated upon a way shall be equipped with a 
braking system to enable the operator to bring the bicycle travelling 
at a speed of fifteen (15) miles per hour to a smooth, safe stop within 
thirty (30) feet on a dry, clean, hard, level surface. 

(8) During the period from one-half hour after sunset to one-half 
hour before sunrise, the operator shall display to the front of his 
bicycle a lamp emitting a white light visible from a distance of at 

• least five hundred (500) feet, and to the rear of said bicycle either a 
lamp emitting a red light or a red reflector visible for not less than 
six hundred (600) feet when directly in front of lawful lower beams 
of headlamps on a motor vehicle. A generator-powered lamp that 
emits light only when the bicycle is moving shall meet the 
requirements of this clause. 

(9) During the period from one-half hour after sunset to one-half 
hour before sunrise, the operator shall display on each pedal of his 
bicycle a reflector, or around each of his ankles reflective material 
visible from the front and rear for a distance of six hundred (600) 
feet, and reflectors or reflective material, either on said bicycle or on 
the person of the operator, visible on each side for a distance of six 
hundred (600) feet, when directly in front of lawful lower beams of 
headlamps of a motor vehicle. This clause shall not prohibit a 
bicycle or its operator to be equipped with lights or reflectors in 
addition to those required by clauses (8) and (9). 

(10) No bicycle shall be operated upon a way with handlebars so 
raised that the operator's hands are above his shoulders while 
gripping them. Any alteration to extend the fork of a bicycle from 
the original design and construction of the bicycle manufacturer is 
prohibited. 

( 1 1 )The operator of a bicycle shall report any accident involving 
either personal injury or property damage in excess of one hundred 
($100) dollars, or both, to the police department. 
D. Violations. 

A police officer who observes a traffic violation committed by a bicyclist 
may request the offender to state his true name and address. Whoever, upon 
such request, refuses to state his name and address or whoever states a false 



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name and address or a name and address which is not his name and address 
in ordinary use, shall be punished by a fme in accordance with the fme 
schedule. An offender who refuses to state his true name and address may be 
arrested without a warrant for such refusal, but no person shall be arrested 
without a warrant for any other traffic law violation committed while 
operating a bicycle. A police officer shall use the ticketing procedure 
described in M.G.L. C. 90C to cite a bicyclist for a traffic violation but the 
violation shall not affect the status of the bicyclist's license to operate a 
motor vehicle nor shall it violate the bicyclist's status in the safe driver 
insurance plan. When a citation is issued to a bicyclist, it shall be clearly 
indicated on the ticket that the violator is a bicyclist, and failure to do so shall 
be a defense to the violation. 

The parent or guardian of a person under 1 8 years of age shall not authorize 
or knowingly permit that person to violate this section. A violation of this 
section by a person under 1 8 years of age shall not affect any civil right or 
liability nor shall the violation be a criminal offense. If the offender is under 
1 6 years of age, the officer may give the notice to the parent or guardian of 
the offender. 

All fines collected by the Town pursuant to this section shall be used by the 
Town for the development and implementation of bicycle safety programs. 

Chapter 182 
VEHICLES, REMOVAL OF 

§ 182-1. Authority to remove; costs. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

GENERAL REFERENCES 

Abandoned vehicles - See Ch. 176. Storage of vehicles - See Ch. 185. 

§ 182-1. Authority to remove; costs. 

The Chief of Police, or the Chiefs designated appointee having charge of 
ways, for the purpose of removing or plowing snow or for removing ice from 
any way, shall have the authority to remove or cause to be removed to some 
convenient place in the Town of Randolph, including in such term a public 
garage in the Town of Randolph, any vehicle interfering with such work, and 
said Chief of Police or the Chiefs designated appointee having charge of 
ways is authorized to impose, upon the owner of such vehicle, liability for 
the cost of such removal and of the storage charges, if any, resulting there 
from. 



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Chapter 185 
QUALITY OF LIFE 

§ 185-1. Unsolicited deliveries. 

§ 185-1. Unsolicited deliveries. 

A. Purpose and Goals. 

The purposes and objectives of this ordinance are as follows: 

To protect the health, safety, welfare, resources and property of the 
general public through prevention of unsolicited deliveries 
(excluding literature from political and/or religious organizations) at 
residential and commercial properties that may affect property 
ownership and/or the quality of life within our Town. 

. To minimize long-term effects to our Town residents' quality of life 
and property ownership from activities, such as delivery of 
unsolicited literature and items, that may adversely impact our 
community within the Town of Randolph. 

To protect the life and property of our Town's citizens from hardship 
due to unsolicited items being left at residential and commercial 
properties within the Town. 

B. Scope and Intent. 

This ordinance sets forth guidelines, standard practices, rules and 
regulations to control and to stop unsolicited deliveries within the 
Town limits. The provisions of this ordinance shall apply to all 
property owners, persons or their agents pertaining to unsolicited 
deliveries or otherwise disturbing the quality of life within the Town, 
by leaving certain unwanted and/or non-requested items left at the 
homes and businesses within the Town limits. 

C. Definitions. 

For the purpose of this ordinance only, the following terms, words, 
phrases, and their derivations, shall have the meanings set forth 
below except where the context clearly indicates a different meaning: 

Unsolicited Deliveries: shall mean the act of placing and/or delivery 
upon a residential or commercial property any unsolicited 
document(s), personal item(s) and/or personal material(s), (excluding 
political advertisements and/or literature) on any location within the 
Town of Randolph whether the location is public or private. 



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D. General Prohibition. 

It shall be unlawful for any person to cause or to deliver unsolicited 
materials to either a residential or commercial property within the 
Town of Randolph, that may cause blight and reduce property values 
or obstruct the quality of life of residents within the Town. 

E. Enforcement. 

The Town of Randolph shall authorize a designated Town 
Enforcement Officer the power to enforce any provisions of this 
ordinance. 

F. Right of Entry, Inspection. 

The Town Enforcement Officer shall have the right to enter upon any 
premises for the purposes of performing the duties imposed upon 
him by the provisions of this ordinance. 

G. Notification of Violation. 

Any person and/or business entity found to be in violation of the 
provisions of this ordinance shall be required to correct the problem 
upon written notification of violation, from the Town's Enforcement 
Officer. Such written notification may require that certain conditions 
be adhered to in the correction of the problem. These may include, 
but are not limited to, the following: 

(1) Use of specific prevention measures and techniques; 

(2) Clean up and disposal of any and all unsolicited materials; 

(3) Completion of all clean-up corrective work within a 
specified time period; and 

(4) Submittal to the Town proof of proper clean-up and/or 
disposal. 

H. Penahies for Noncompliance. 
A penalty is hereby established whereby any person who shall violate any 
provision of this ordinance shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and 
shall, upon conviction, be fined in accordance with the Fine Schedule. Each 
day after notification was given for violation for any particular section of this 
ordinance shall constitute a separable offense for the purpose of the Town's 
enforcement of this ordinance. In addition, the Town Counsel is authorized 
to petition any court of competent jurisdiction for an injunction to enjoin the 
continuance of such violation. This remedy shall be cumulative of and to all 
other enforcement powers granted to the Town by the terms of its Charter or 
any ordinance, or by the laws of the Commonwealth. 



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Chapter 188 
VENDING MACHINES, PRINTED MATTER 

§ 188-1. Permit required. § 188-8. Maintenance. 

§ 188-2. Definitions. § 188-9. Identification. 

§ 188-3. Application; fee. § 188-10. Time limit for compliance. 

§ 188-4. Insurance required. § 188-11. Notice of denial; permit. 

§ 188-5. Grant or denial of permit; hearing. § 188-12. Violations and penalties enforcement. 

§ 188-6. Location. § 188-13. Abandonment. 

§ 188-7. Use for advertising purposes prohibited. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendmentsnoted where applicable.] 

§ 188-1. Permit required. 

No person, firm, corporation, association, partnership, trust or other type of 
entity shall place, install, use or maintain any printed matter vending machine 
on any public property without obtaining a written permit therefore from the 
Town Council. 
§ 188-2. Definitions. 

As used in this chapter, the following terms shall have the meanings 
indicated: PPUNTED MATTER VENDING MACHINE (HEREINAFTER 
"MACHINES") - Any coin or token-operated box, container, stand, rack, 
storage unit or other dispenser or device installed, placed, used, operated or 
maintained for the display and sale or distribution of newspapers, periodicals 
or other printed matter for public use. 
§ 188-3. Application; fee. 

The application for the permit shall fully and specifically describe the printed 
matter vending machine by setting forth its size by height, depth and width or 
any other relevant dimensions if varying in height, depth and width, the name 
and business address of the applicant, the exact date or dates said machine 
will be in place or in operation, the exact place where said machine will be 
located, the manner by which said machine shall be affixed or held in place 
and the description of any object to which said machine shall be affixed. 
Further reasonable information which may affect the public safety, health or 
order in the community may be requested from the applicant. An annual 
application fee, the amount of which will be determined upon passage of this 
chapter and annually thereafter by the Town Council, which fee will be 
reasonably related to the costs of processing said application, shall be paid 
for each machine licensed. The form of application shall be approved by the 
Town Council. 

§ 188-4. Insurance required. 

A certification of insurance indemnifying and saving hannless the Town of 
Randolph from any loss or damage from all suits, actions and claims of any 
and every nature for or on account of any injuries or damage received or 
sustained by any person or company or other entity arising from the 



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installation, use or maintenance of such machines shall be filed with the 
Town Council prior to its issuance of any permit hereunder; further, said 
policy will directly provide for payment to any person or company or other 
entity injured thereby. 

§ 188-5. Grant or denial of permit; hearing. 

A. Within 20 days of receipt of such completed application, the Town 
Council shall grant a permit or shall order a hearing within an additional 
10 days, giving at least five days' written notice to the applicant. 

B. Within 10 days next following the close of the hearing, the Town 
Council shall grant such permit or shall deny such application upon a 
finding that issuance of such a permit would lead to the creation of a 
nuisance or would endanger the public health, safety or order by: 

(1) Unreasonably increasing pedestrian traffic in the area in which 
the machine is located; or 

(2) Endangering the public safety by reason of the machine's 
projecting onto, into or over any part of the roadway of any public 
street; by reason of its being affixed to a site or location used for 
public utility purposes, public transportation purposes or 
governmental use; by reason of its being located in such a manner as 
to unreasonably interfere with or impede the flow of pedestrian or 
vehicular traffic, sidewalk or street cleaning and/or snow removal 
and the ingress or egress from any residence, place of business or 
any legally parked or stopped vehicle; or by reason of aesthetic harm 
and defacement caused by its being affixed to poles, posts, traffic 
signs or signals, hydrants, mailboxes or other objects at or near such 
location. 

§ 188-6. Location. 

No machine shall be chained, bolted or otherwise attached to property owned 
or maintained by the Town of Randolph within three feet of any crosswalk; 
within 15 feet of any fire hydrant; within five feet of any fire or police call 
box or other emergency facility; within five feet of any driveway, public or 
private; within three feet ahead or 15 feet to the rear of any designated bus 
stop, taxi stand or place marked for handicapped parking; within three feet of 
any bus bench or shelter; at any location whereby the clear space for the 
passageway of pedestrians is reduced to less than four feet; or within three 
feet of any display window of any building abutting the sidewalk or other 
public place in such a manner as to impede or interfere with the reasonable 
use of such window for display purposes. 
§ 188-7. Use for advertising purposes prohibited. 

No machine shall be used for advertising signs or publicity purposes, other 
than that which is essential to identify, on no more than two sides of the 
machine, the printed matter offered for sale therein. No letter thereon shall 
exceed two square inches in size. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
§ 188-8. Maintenance. 

Each machine shall be maintained in a clean and neat condition and in good 
repair at all times, and it shall be of one color that does not unnecessarily 
contrast with the immediate surroundings, except that the lettering may 
contrast with such one color. No reflectorized paint, Day-Glo, fluorescent or 
scotchlite reflective materials or materials of like nature may be used on such 
machine. 

§ 188-9. Identification. 

The person who places or maintains such machine shall have his/her name or 
his/her Massachusetts agent's name, address and telephone number affixed 
thereto in a place where such information may easily be seen. 
§ 188-10. Time limit for compliance. 

All persons who have placed or intend to place machines in the Town of 
Randolph shall have 30 days from passage of the within chapter to comply 
with said provisions or such additional time as the Town Council may allow 
in its discretion. 

§ 188-11. Notice of denial; permit conditions. 

Notice of the denial of an application for permit shall be in writing and 
accompanied by a statement of the reasons therefor. No application shall be 
denied if the anticipated harm is not significant or if the likelihood of its 
occurrence is remote. The Town Council may impose conditions upon the 
permit, but said conditions may only relate to compliance with the permit, 
applicable laws or ordinances or to public safety, health or order or to steps 
required to be taken to guard against creation of a nuisance or to ensure 
adequate safety and security for the public. No applicant having been denied 
a permit as aforesaid shall submit the same or similar application within one 
year of said denial without including in said new application facts showing 
that the circumstances upon which the original denial was based have 
substantially changed. 

§ 188-12. Violations and penalties; enforcement. 

Violation of the terms and conditions in this chapter or in any permit granted 
hereunder shall be punishable by a fine in accordance with the Fine 
Schedule, and said violation shall be cause for cancellation, suspension, 
revocation or modification of the permit, after hearing, upon three days' 
written notice sent by registered or certified mail to the name and address set 
forth in the annual application. The Town of Randolph may petition the 
Superior Court Department of the Trial Court to enjoin any violation of this 
chapter or the conditions in any permit granted hereunder. If, after hearing, 
the applicant fails to comply with the order of the Town Council, said Town 
Council may order the removal of said machines and place them in storage in 
a secure place. The cost of removal and storage shall be paid by the permit 
holder. 



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§ 188-13. Abandonment. 

If such machine is not used for the distribution of printed matter for a period 
of 60 calendar days, the same shall be deemed as abandoned property and 
may be disposed of according to law. 

Chapter 189 

Collection Bins and Recycling Bins for public and private ways 

Chapter 192 
WATER 

ARTICLE I UNPAID CHARGES 

§ 192-1. Fee imposed. § 192-3. Authority to promulgate rules and regulations. 

§ 192-1.1. Interest. 

§ 192-1.2. Purpose. 

ARTICLE II WATER SUPPLY 

EMERGENCIES § 192-4. Violations and penalties. 

§ 192-5. Administration of penalties; warnings. 

[HISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments noted where applicable.] 

GENERAL REFERENCES 
Water Commissioners - See Ch. 68. 

ARTICLE I 
Unpaid Charges 

§ 192-1. Fee imposed. 

A lien fee in accordance with the Fee Schedule shall be added to those 
accounts certified by the Assessors as unpaid water charges which are added 
to real estate taxes under the provisions of M.G.L c. 40, § 42C. 
§192-1.1. Interest. [Added 4-16-1996 ATM by Art. 14, approved 7-29-1996] 
The Town shall accrue interest at the rate of 12% per annum on any water 
rate and/or sewer use charge which shall remain unpaid more than 30 
(calendar) days from the billing date. 

ARTICLE II 
Water Supply Emergencies 

§ 192-2. Purpose. 

This article is intended to preserve, maintain and increase the water supply of 
the Tri-Town Water System. 

§ 192-3. Authority to promulgate rules and regulations. 

Whenever a declaration of a state of water supply emergency or resulting 
order is legally declared and imposed on the Town of Randolph by an 
appropriate state or federal agency, or a water conservation emergency is 



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declared by the Tri-Town Board of Water Commissioners (The Braintree 
Water and Sewer Commissioners, Holbrook Board of Selectmen/Board of 
PubHc Works, Town of Randolph Town Council), said Tri-Town Board of 
Water Commissioners is authorized to promulgate such reasonable rules and 
regulations as are necessary to implement said declaration or order of water 
conservation emergency. 
§ 192-4. Violations and penalties. 

Any person who is found, after a hearing before the Braintree Water and 
Sewer Commissioners, Holbrook Board of Selectmen/Board of Public Works 
or Town of Randolph Town Council or designee, respectively, to have 
violated any of said rules and regulations as promulgated by the 
Commissioners attendant to a declaration of a state of water supply 
emergency or resulting order or water conservation emergency shall, for each 
offense, be punished by a civil penalty in accordance with the Fine Schedule. 
Each day such violation continues shall constitute a separate offense. 
§ 192-5. Administration of penalties; warnings. 

A. The Braintree Water and Sewer Commissioners, Holbrook Board of 
Selectmen/Board of Public Works and Town of Randolph Town Council 
shall be the exclusive administrator for processing receipted violations of 
water usage restriction orders. 

B. There shall be one warning issued and recorded on an approved 
appropriate department administrative form. Said warning shall be sent 
by certified mail to the site of the violation. Subsequent violations 
recorded shall be punished by a fme in accordance with the Fine 
Schedule. Subsequent violations shall be recorded on an approved 
department administrative from which stipulates that a violation has been 
found and a civil penalty has been applied with mandatory payment of 
said civil penalty to be receipted by the appropriate department. 



IHISTORY: Adopted 4-18-1995 ATM by Art. 8, approved 10-27-1995. 
Amendments adopted May 26, 2009 ATM by Art. 29.] 



Chapter 196 
WETLANDS 



§ 196-1. Purpose. 

§ 196-2. Prohibited uses. 

§ 196-3. Permitted uses. 

§ 196-4. Variances. 

§ 196-5. Notice and hearings. 

§ 196-6. Coordination with other boards. 



§ 196-9. Definitions. 
§ 196-10. Security. 
§ 196-11. Enforcement. 
§ 196-12. Burden of proof. 
§ 196-13. Appeals. 

§ 196-14. Relation to the wetlands protection 
act 

§ 196-15. Severability. 



§ 196-7. Permits and conditions. 
§ 196-8. Regulations. 



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§ 196-1. Purpose. 

The purpose of this ordinance is to protect the wetlands, water resources, 
flood prone areas, and adjoining upland areas in the Town of Randolph by 
controlling activities deemed by the Conservation Commission likely to have 
a significant or cumulative effect on resource area values, including but not 
limited to the following: public or private water supply, groundwater supply, 
flood control, erosion and sedimentation control, storm damage prevention 
including water quality, prevention and control of pollution, fisheries, 
wildlife habitat, rare species habitat including rare plant and animal species, 
agriculture, aquaculture, and recreation values, deemed important to the 
community (collectively, the "resource area values protected by this 
ordinance"). 

This ordinance is intended to utilize the Home Rule authority of this 
municipality so as to protect the resource areas under the Wetlands 
Protection Act (M.G.L. c.l31 §40; the Act) to a greater degree, to protect 
additional resource areas beyond the Act recognized by the Town as 
significant, to protect all resource areas for their additional values beyond 
those recognized in the Act, and to impose in local regulations and permits 
additional standards and procedures stricter than those of the Act and 
regulations there under (310 CMR 10.00), subject, however, to the rights and 
benefits accorded to agricultural uses and structures of all kinds under the 
laws of the Commonwealth and other relevant ordinances of the Town of 
Randolph. 

§ 196-2. Prohibited uses. 

Except as permitted by the Conservation Commission no person shall 
commence to remove, fill, dredge, build upon, degrade, discharge into, or 
otherwise alter the following resource areas: any wetlands, marshes, wet 
meadows, bogs, swamps, vernal pools, springs, banks, reservoirs, lakes, 
ponds of any size, land under water bodies; intermittent streams, brooks and 
creeks; lands adjoining these resource areas out to a distance of 100 feet, 
known as the buffer zone; perennial rivers, streams, brooks and creeks; lands 
adjoining these resource areas out to a distance of 200 feet, known as the 
riverfront area; lands subject to flooding or inundation by groundwater or 
surface water; and lands subject to flooding (collectively the "resource areas 
protected by this ordinance"). Said resource areas shall be protected whether 
or not they border surface waters. 

The jurisdiction of this ordinance shall not extend to uses and structures of 
agriculture that enjoy the rights and privileges of laws and regulations of the 
Commonwealth governing agriculture, including work performed for normal 
maintenance or improvement of land in agricultural or aquacultural uses as 



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defined by the Wetlands Protection Act regulations, found at 310 CMR 
10.04. 

§ 196-3. Permitted uses. 

The applications and permits required by this ordinance shall not be required 
for work performed for normal maintenance or improvement of land in 
agricultural and aquacultural use as defined by the Wetlands Protection Act 
regulations at 310 CMR 10.04. 

The applications and permits required by this ordinance shall not be required 
for maintaining, repairing, or replacing, but not substantially changing or 
enlarging, an existing and lawfully located structure or facility used in the 
service of the public to provide electric, gas, water, telephone, telegraph, or 
other telecommunication services, provided that written notice has been 
given to the Conservation Commission prior to commencement of work, and 
provided that the work conforms to any performance standards and design 
specifications in regulations adopted by the Commission. 

The applications and permits required by this ordinance shall not be required 
for emergency projects necessary for the protection of the health and safety 
of the public, provided that the work is to be 

performed by or has been ordered to be performed by an agency of the 
Commonwealth or a political subdivision thereof; provided that advance 
notice, oral or written, has been given to the Commission prior to 
commencement of work or within 24 hours after commencement; provided 
that the Commission or its agent certifies the work as an emergency project; 
provided that the work is performed only for the time and place certified by 
the Commission for the limited purposes necessary to abate the emergency; 
and provided that within 21 days of commencement of an emergency project 
a permit application shall be filed with the Commission for review as 
provided by this ordinance. Upon failure to meet these and other 
requirements of the Commission, the Commission may, after notice and a 
public hearing, revoke or modify an emergency project approval and order 
restoration and mitigation measures. 

Other than stated in this ordinance, the exceptions provided in the Wetlands 
Protection Act (M.G.L. c. 131 §40) and regulations (310 CMR 10.00) shall 
not apply under this ordinance. 

§ 196-4. Variances. 

Written application shall be filed with the Conservation Commission to 
perform activities affecting resource areas protected by this ordinance. The 
permit application shall include such information and plans as are deemed 
necessary by the Commission to describe proposed activities and their effects 



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on the resource areas protected by this ordinance. No activities shall 
commence without receiving and complying with a permit issued pursuant to 
this ordinance. 

The Commission in an appropriate case may accept as the application and 
plans under this ordinance any application and plans filed under the Wetlands 
Protection Act (M.G.L. c. 131 §40) and regulations (310 CMR 10.00), but 
the Commission is not obliged to do so. 

Any person desiring to know whether or not a proposed activity or an area is 
subject to this ordinance may in writing request a determination from the 
Commission. Such a Request for Determination of Applicability (RDA) or 
Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation (ANRAD) filed under the 
Act shall include information and plans as are deemed necessary by the 
Commission. 

At the time of an application, the applicant shall pay a filing fee specified in 
regulations of the Commission. The fee is in addition to that required by the 
Wetlands Protection Act and regulations. 

Pursuant to M.G.L. c. 44 §53G and regulations promulgated by the 
Commission, the Commission may impose reasonable fees upon applicants 
for the purpose of securing outside consultants including engineers, wetlands 
scientists, wildlife biologists or other experts in order to aid in the review of 
proposed projects. Such funds shall be deposited with the town treasurer, 
who shall create an account specifically for this purpose. Additional 
consultant fees may be requested where the requisite review is more 
expensive than originally calculated or where new information requires 
additional consultant services. 

Only costs relating to consultant work done in connection with a project for 
which a consultant fee has been collected shall be paid from this account, and 
expenditures may be made at the sole discretion of the Commission. Any 
consultant hired under this provision shall be selected by, and report 
exclusively to, the Commission. The Commission shall provide applicants 
with written notice of the selection of a consultant, identifying the consultant, 
the amount of the fee to be charged to the applicant, and a request for 
payment of that fee. Notice shall be deemed to have been given on the date it 
is mailed or delivered. 

The applicant may withdraw the application or request within five (5) 
business days of the date notice is given without incurring any costs or 
expenses. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

The entire fee must be received before the initiation of consulting services. 
Failure by the applicant to pay the requested consultant fee within ten (10) 
business days of the request for payment shall be cause for the Commission 
to declare the application administratively incomplete and deny the permit 
without prejudice, except in the case of an appeal. The Commission shall 
inform the applicant and Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) of 
such a decision in writing. 

The applicant may appeal the selection of an outside consultant to the Town 
Council, who may disqualify the consuhant only on the grounds that the 
consultant has a conflict of interest or is not properly qualified. The 
minimum qualifications shall consist of either an educational degree or three 
or more years of practice in the field at issue, or a related field. The applicant 
shall make such an appeal in writing, and must be received within ten (10) 
business days of the date that request for consultant fees was made by the 
Commission. Such appeal shall extend the applicable time limits for action 
upon the application. 

§196-5. Notice and Hearings. 

Any person filing a permit or other application or RDA or ANRAD or other 
request with the Conservation Commission at the same time shall give 
written notice thereof, by certified mail (return receipt requested) or hand 
delivered, to all abutters at their mailing addresses shown on the most recent 
applicable tax list of the assessors, including owners of land directly opposite 
on any public or private street or way, and abutters to the abutters within 300 
feet of the property line of the applicant, including any in another 
municipality or across a body of water. The notice shall state a brief 
description of the project or other proposal and the date of any Commission 
hearing or meeting date if known. The notice to abutters also shall include a 
copy of the application or request, with plans, or shall state where copies may 
be examined and obtained by abutters. An affidavit of the person providing 
such notice, with a copy of the notice mailed or delivered, shall be filed with 
the Commission. When a person requesting a determination is other than the 
owner, the request, the notice of the hearing and the determination itself shall 
be sent by the Commission to the owner as well as to the person making the 
request. 

The Commission shall conduct a public hearing on any permit application, 
RDA, or ANRAD with written notice given at the expense of the applicant, 
at least five business days prior to the hearing, in a newspaper of general 
circulation in the municipality. The Commission shall commence the public 
hearing within 2 1 days from receipt of a completed permit application, RDA, 
or ANRAD unless an extension is authorized in writing by the applicant. The 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Commission shall have authority to continue the hearing to a specific date 
announced at the hearing, for reasons stated at the hearing, which may 
include the need for additional infonnation from the applicant or others as 
deemed necessary by the Commission in its discretion, based on comments 
and recommendations of the boards and officials listed in §VI. 

The Commission shall issue its permit, other order or determination in 
writing within 21 days of the close of the public hearing thereon unless an 
extension is authorized in writing by the applicant. The Commission in an 
appropriate case may combine its hearing under this ordinance with the 
hearing conducted under the Wetlands Protection Act (M.G.L. c.l31 §40) 
and regulations (310 CMR 10.00). 

§196-6. Coordination with Other Boards. 

Any person filing a permit application, RDA, or ANRAD with the 
Conservation Commission shall provide a copy thereof at the same time, by 
certified mail (return receipt requested) or hand delivery, to the Town 
Council, Planning Board, Board of Appeals, Board of Health, Town 
Engineer, and Building Inspector. A copy shall be provided in the same 
manner to the Commission of the adjoining municipality, if the application or 
RDA pertains to property within 300 feet of that municipality. An affidavit of 
the person providing notice, with a copy of the notice mailed or delivered, 
shall be filed with the Commission. The Commission shall not take final 
action until the above boards and officials have had 14 days from receipt of 
notice to file written comments and recommendations with the Commission, 
which the Commission shall take into account but which shall not be binding 
on the Commission. 

The applicant shall have the right to receive any comments and 
recommendations, and to respond to them at a hearing of the Commission, 
prior to final action. 

§196-7. Permits and Conditions. 

If the Conservation Commission, after a public hearing, determines that the 
activities which are subject to the permit application, or the land and water 
uses which will result therefrom, are likely to have a significant individual or 
cumulative effect on the resource area values protected by this ordinance, the 
Commission, within 21 days of the close of the hearing, shall issue or deny a 
permit for the activities requested. The Commission shall take into account 
the extent to which the applicant has avoided, minimized and mitigated any 
such effect. The Commission also shall take into account any loss, 
degradation, isolation, and replacement or replication of such protected 
resource areas elsewhere in the community and the watershed, resulting from 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

\ 

past activities, whether permitted, unpermitted or exempt, and foreseeable 
future activities. 

If it issues a permit, the Commission shall impose conditions which the 1 
Commission deems necessary or desirable to protect said resource area 
values, and all activities shall be conducted in accordance with those 
conditions. Where no conditions are adequate to protect said resource area 
values, the Commission is empowered to deny a permit for failure to meet 
the requirements of this ordinance. It may also deny a permit: for failure to 
submit necessary information and plans requested by the Commission; for 
failure to comply with the procedures, design specifications, performance 
standards, and other requirements in regulations of the Commission; or for 
failure to avoid, minimize or mitigate unacceptable significant or cumulative 
effects upon the resource area values protected by this ordinance. Due 
consideration shall be given to any demonstrated hardship on the applicant 
by reason of denial, as presented at the public hearing. The Commission may 
waive specifically identified and requested procedures, design specifications, 
performance standards, or other requirements set forth in its regulations, 
provided that: the Commission finds in writing after said public hearing that 
there are no reasonable conditions or alternatives that would allow the 
proposed activity to proceed in compliance with said regulations; that 
avoidance, minimization and mitigation have been employed to the 
maximum extent feasible; and that the waiver is necessary to accommodate 
an overriding public interest or to avoid a decision that so restricts the use of 
the property as to constitute an unconstitutional taking without 
compensation. 

In reviewing activities within the buffer zone, the Commission shall presume 
the buffer zone is important to the protection of other resource areas because 
activities undertaken in close proximity have a high likelihood of adverse 
impact, either immediately, as a consequence of construction, or over time, 
as a consequence of daily operation or existence of the activities. These 
adverse impacts from construction and use can include, without limitation, 
erosion, siltation, loss of groundwater recharge, poor water quality, and loss 
of wildlife habitat. The Commission may establish, in its regulations, design 
specifications, performance standards, and other measures and safeguards, 
including setbacks, no-disturb areas, no-build areas, and other work limits for 
protection of such lands, including without limitation strips of continuous, 
undisturbed vegetative cover, unless the applicant convinces the Commission 
that the area or part of it may be disturbed without hami to the values 
protected by the ordinance. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



In reviewing activities within the riverfront area, the Commission shall 
presume the riverfront area is important to all the resource area values unless 
demonstrated otherwise, and no permit issued hereunder shall permit any 
activities unless the applicant, in addition to meeting the otherwise applicable 
requirements of this ordinance, has proved by a preponderance of the 
evidence that (1) there is no practicable alternative to the proposed project 
with less adverse effects, and that (2) such activities, including proposed 
mitigation measures, will have no significant adverse impact on the areas or 
values protected by this ordinance. The Commission shall regard as 
practicable an alternative which is reasonably available and capable of being 
done after taking into consideration the proposed property use, overall 
project purpose (e.g., residential, institutional, commercial, or industrial), 
logistics, existing technology, costs of the alternatives, and overall project 
costs. 

To prevent resource area loss, the Commission shall require applicants to 
avoid alteration wherever feasible; to minimize alteration; and, where 
alteration is unavoidable and has been minimized, to provide full mitigation. 
The Commission may authorize or require replication of wetlands as a form 
of mitigation, but only with specific plans, professional design, proper 
safeguards, adequate security, and professional monitoring and reporting to 
assure success, because of the high likelihood of failure of replication. 

The Commission may require a wildlife habitat study of the project area, to 
be paid for by the applicant, whenever it deems appropriate, regardless the 
type of resource area or the amount or type of alteration proposed. The 
decision shall be based upon the Commission's estimation of the importance 
of the habitat area considering (but not limited to) such factors as proximity 
to other areas suitable for wildlife, importance of wildlife "corridors" in the 
area, or actual or possible presence of rare plant or animal species in the area. 
The work shall be performed by an individual who at least meets the 
qualifications set out in the wildlife habitat section of the Wetlands 
Protection Act regulations (310 CMR 10.60). 

The Commission shall presume that all areas meeting the definition of 
"vernal pools" under §DC of this be overcome only by the presentation of 
credible evidence which, in the judgment of the Commission, demonstrates 
that the basin or depression does not provide essential habitat functions. Any 
formal evaluation should be performed by an individual who at least meets 
the qualifications under the wildlife habitat section of the Wetlands 
Protection Act regulations. 



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A permit, Determination of Applicability (DOA), or Order of Resource Area 
Delineation (ORAD) shall expire three years from the date of issuance. 
Notwithstanding the above, the Commission in its discretion may issue a 
permit expiring five years from the date of issuance for recurring or 
continuous maintenance work, provided that annual notification of time and 
location of work is given to the Commission. Any permit may be renewed 
once for an additional one-year period, provided that a request for a renewal 
is received in writing by the Commission prior to expiration. 
Notwithstanding the above, a permit may identify requirements which shall 
be enforceable for a stated number of years, indefinitely, or until permanent 
protection is in place, and shall apply to all present and future owners of the 
land. 

For good cause the Commission may revoke any permit, DOA, or ORAD or 
any other order, determination or other decision issued under this ordinance 
after notice to the holder, the public, abutters, and town boards, pursuant to 
§V and §VI, and after a public hearing. 

Amendments to permits, DO As, or ORADs shall be handled in the manner 
set out in the Wetlands Protection Act regulations and policies thereunder. 

The Commission in an appropriate case may combine the decision issued 
under this ordinance with the permit, DOA, ORAD, or Certificate of 
Compliance (COC) issued under the Wetlands Protection Act and 
regulations. 

No work proposed in any application shall be undertaken until the permit, or 
ORAD issued by the Commission with respect to such work has been 
recorded in the registry of deeds or, if the land affected is registered land, in 
the registry section of the land court for the district wherein the land lies, and 
until the holder of the permit certifies in writing to the Commission that the 
document has been recorded. If the applicant fails to perform such recording, 
the Commission may record the documents itself and require the Applicant to 
furnish the recording fee therefore, either at the time of recording or as a 
condition precedent to the issuance of a COC. 

§196-8. Regulations. 

After public notice and public hearing, the Conservation Commission shall 
promulgate rules and regulations to effectuate the purposes of this ordinance, 
effective when voted and filed with the Town Clerk. 

Failure by the Commission to promulgate such rules and regulations or a 
legal declaration of their invalidity by a court of law shall not act to suspend 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



or invalidate the effect of this ordinance. At a minimum these regulations 
shall reiterate the terms defined in this ordinance, define additional terms not 
inconsistent with the ordinance, and impose filing and consultant fees and 
penalties for noncompliance. 

§196-9. Definitions. 

The following definitions shall apply in the interpretation and 
implementation of this ordinance. 

AGRICULTURE shall refer to the definition as provided by M.G.L. c. 128 
§1A. 

ALTER shall include, without limitation, the following activities when 
undertaken to, upon, within or affecting resource areas protected by this 
ordinance: 

(1) Removal, excavation, or dredging of soil, sand, gravel, or aggregate 
materials of any kind 

(2) Changing of preexisting drainage characteristics, flushing 
characteristics, salinity distribution, sedimentation patterns, flow 
patterns, or flood retention characteristics 

(3) Drainage, or other disturbance of water level or water table 

(4) Dumping, discharging, or filling with any material which may 
degrade water quality 

(5) Placing of fill, or removal of material, which would alter elevation 

(6) Driving of piles, erection, expansion or repair of buildings, or 
structures of any kind 

(7) Placing of obstrucdons or objects in water 

(8) Destruction of plant life including cutting or trimming of trees and 
shrubs 

(9) Changing temperature, biochemical oxygen demand, or other 
physical, biological, or chemical characteristics of any waters 

(10) Any activities, changes, or work which may cause or tend to 
contribute to pollution of any body of water or groundwater 

(1 l)Incremental activities which have, or may have, a cumulative 
adverse impact on the resource areas protected by this ordinance. 

BANK shall include the land area which normally abuts and confines a water 
body; the lower boundary being the mean annual low flow level, and the 
upper boundary being the first observable break in the slope or the mean 
annual flood level, whichever is higher. 

PERSON shall include any individual, group of individuals, association, 
partnership, corporation, company, business organization, trust, estate, the 



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Commonwealth or political subdivision thereof to the extent subject to town 
ordinances, administrative agency, public or quasi-public corporation or 
body, this municipality, and any other legal entity, its legal representatives, 
agents, or assigns. 

POND shall follow the definition of 310 CMR 10.04 except that the size 
threshold of 1 0,000 square feet shall not apply. 

RARE SPECIES shall include, without limitation, all vertebrate and 
invertebrate animals and all plant species listed as endangered, threatened, or 
of special concern by the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, 
regardless whether the site in which they occur has been previously identified 
by the Division. 

VERNAL POOL shall include, in addition to scientific definitions found in 
the regulations under the Wetlands Protection Act, any confined basin or 
depression not occurring in existing lawns, gardens, landscaped areas or 
driveways which, at least in most years, holds water for a minimum of two 
continuous months during the spring and/or summer, contains at least 200 
cubic feet of water at some time during most years, is free of adult predatory 
fish populations, and provides essential breeding and rearing habitat 
fijnctions for amphibian, reptile or other vernal pool community species, 
regardless of whether the site has been certified by the Massachusetts 
Division of Fisheries and Wildlife. The boundary of the resource area for 
vernal pools shall be the mean annual high-water line defining the 
depression. 

Except as otherwise provided in this ordinance or in associated regulations of 
the Conservation Commission, the definitions of terms and the procedures in 
this ordinance shall be as set forth in the Wetlands Protection Act (M.G.L. c. 
131 §40) and regulations (310 CMR 10.00). 

§196-10. Security. 

As part of a permit issued under this ordinance, in addition to any security 
required by any other municipal or state board, agency, or official, the 
Conservation Commission may require that the performance and observance 
of the conditions imposed thereunder (including conditions requiring 
mitigation work) be secured wholly or in part by one or both of the methods 
described below: 

A. By a proper bond, deposit of money or negotiable securities under a 
written third-party escrow arrangement, or other undertaking of financial 
responsibility sufficient in the opinion of the Commission, to be released 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



in whole or in part upon issuance of a COC for work performed pursuant 
to the permit. 

B. By accepting a conservation restriction, easement, or other covenant 
enforceable in a court of law, executed and duly recorded by the owner 
of record, running with the land to the benefit of this municipality 
whereby the permit conditions shall be performed and observed before 
any lot may be conveyed other than by mortgage deed. This method shall 
be used only with the consent of the applicant. 

§196-11. Enforcement. 

No person shall remove, fill, dredge, build upon, degrade, or otherwise alter 
resource areas protected by this ordinance, or cause, suffer, or allow such 
activity, or leave in place unauthorized fill, or otherwise fail to restore 
illegally altered land to its original condition, or fail to comply with a permit 
or an enforcement order issued pursuant to this ordinance. 

The Conservation Commission, its agents, officers, and employees shall have 
authority to enter upon privately owned land for the purpose of performing 
their duties under this ordinance and may make or cause to be made such 
examinations, surveys, or sampling as the Commission deems necessary, 
subject to the constitutions and laws of the United States and the 
Commonwealth. 

The Commission shall have authority to enforce this ordinance, its 
regulations, and permits issued thereunder by letters, phone calls, electronic 
communication and other informal methods, violation notices, non-criminal 
citations under M.G.L. c. 40 §2 ID, and civil and criminal court actions. Any 
person who violates provisions of this deemed necessary to remedy such 
violations, or may be fined, or both. 

Upon request of the Commission, the Town Council and Town Counsel shall 
take legal action for enforcement under civil law. Upon request of the 
Commission, the chief of police shall take legal action for enforcement under 
criminal law. 

Municipal boards and officers, including any police officer or other officer 
having police powers, shall have authority to assist the Commission in 
enforcement. 

Any person who violates any provision of this ordinance, or regulations, 
permits, or administrative orders issued thereunder, shall be punished by a 
fine in accordance with the Fine Schedule. Each day or portion thereof 



171 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



during which a violation continues, or unauthorized fill or other alteration 
remains in place, shall constitute a separate offense, and each provision of 
the ordinance, regulations, permits, or administrative orders violated shall 
constitute a separate offense. 

As an alternative to criminal prosecution in a specific case, the Commission 
may issue citations with specific penalties pursuant to the non-criminal 
disposition procedure set forth in M.G.L. c. 40 §2 ID, which has been 
adopted by the Town in §1-6 of the Town's General Ordinances. 

§196-12. Burden of Proof. 

The applicant for a permit shall have the burden of proving by a 
preponderance of the credible evidence that the work proposed in the permit 
application will not have unacceptable significant or cumulative effect upon 
the resource area values protected by this ordinance. Failure to provide 
adequate evidence to the Conservation Commission supporting this burden 
shall be sufficient cause for the Commission to deny a permit or grant a 
permit with conditions. 

§196-13. Appeals. 

A decision of the Conservation Commission shall be reviewable in the 
superior court in accordance with M.G.L. c. 249 §4. 

§196-14. Relation to the Wetlands Protection Act. 

This ordinance is adopted under the Home Rule Amendment of the 
Massachusetts Constitution and the Home Rule statutes, independent of the 
Wetlands Protection Act (M.G.L. c. 131 §40) and regulations (310 CMR 
10.00) thereunder. It is the intention of this ordinance that the purposes, 
jurisdiction, authority, exemptions, regulations, specifications, standards, and 
other requirements shall be interpreted and administered as stricter than those 
under the Wetlands Protection Act and regulations. 

Chapter 197 
Severability 

§ 197-1. Severability. 

§ 197-1. Severability. 

The invalidity of any section or provision of these ordinances shall not 
invalidate any other section or provision thereof, nor shall it invalidate any 
permit, approval or determination which previously has been issued. 



172 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
Council Order: 2012-024 

ESTABLISHING AN AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST FUND 
*Still pending before the Council 

Be it Ordered that the Randolph Town Council TO ACCEPT THE 
PROVISIONS OF M.G.L. CHAPTER 44, SECTION 55C AND TO 
AMEND THE CODE OF THE TOWN OF RANDOLPH TO ESTABLISH 
THE RANDOLPH AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST FUND 

To accepts the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44 Section 
55C establishing a Trust to be known as the "Randolph Affordable Housing 
Trust Fund", whose purpose shall be to provide for the creation and 
preservation of affordable housing within the Town of Randolph for the 
benefit of low and moderate-income households, and in implementation 
thereof will vote to amend the Code of the Town of Randolph by adding the 
following as section 
CHAPTER XX_ 

THE RANDOLPH AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST FUND 
XX -1. Composition 

There shall be a five (5) member Board of Trustees (hereinafter the "Board"). 
All Trustees are to be appointed by the Town Manager. One ( 1 ) Trustee shall 
be a member of the Town Council. Trustees shall serve for a term of two (2) 
years, except that three (3) of the initial Trustee appointments shall be for a 
term of one (1) year. In the event of a vacancy, the appointment shall be 
made in the same manner as the original appointment. 
XX -2. Organization 

The Board of Trustees shall annually elect one (1) Trustee who shall serve as 
the Chairperson and a second Trustee who shall serve as a Clerk. 
XX -3. Meetings of Trustees 

Meetings of the Board shall be held on a regular basis, but not less than two 
(2) times per year. A quorum of the Board shall be the majority of the 
number of authorized Trustees. A Trust is a governmental body for purposes 
of Section 23 A, 23B, and 23C of M.G.L. Chapter 39, the Open Meeting Law. 
XX_-4. Powers 

The Board of Trustees shall have the following powers, all of which shall be 
carried on in furtherance of the purposes set forth in Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter. 44, Section 55C, except that the purchase, sale, lease, 
exchange, transfer or conveyance of any interest in real property shall be 
subject to the approval of the Town Manager and the Town Council and 
except that the incurring of any debt, borrowing of any money, granting of 
mortgage or the pledging of Trust assets shall be the subject to the approval 
of Town Manager and the Town Council by a two-thirds (2/3) majority vote: 
(1) To accept and receive real property, personal property or money, by gift, 
grant, devise, or transfer from any person, firm, corporation or other public 



173 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



or private entity, including without limitation, grants of funds or other 
property tendered to the Trust in connection with provisions of any ordinance 
or bylaw or any general or special law of any other source, including money 
from M.GL. Chapter 44B (Community Preservation Act); 

(2) To purchase and retain real or personal property, including without 
restriction investments that yield a high rate of income or no income; 

(3) To sell, lease, exchange, transfer or convey any personal, mixed, or real 
property at public auction or by private contract for such consideration and 
on such terms as to credit or otherwise, and to make such contracts and enter 
into such undertaking relative to the Trust property as the board deems 
advisable notwithstanding the length of any such lease or contract; 

(4) To execute, acknowledge and deliver deeds, assignments, transfers, 
pledges, leases, covenants, contracts, promissory notes, releases and other 
instruments sealed or unsealed, necessary, proper or incident to any 
transaction in which the board engages for the accomplishment of the 
purposes of the Trust; 

(5) To employ advisors and agents, such as accountants, appraisers and 
lawyers as the board deems necessary; 

(6) To pay reasonable compensation and expenses to all advisors and agents 
and to apportion such compensation between income and principal as the 
board deems advisable; 

(7) To apportion receipts and charges between incomes and principal as the 
board deems advisable, to amortize premiums and establish sinking funds for 
such purpose, and to create reserves for depreciation or depletion or 
otherwise; 

(8) To participate in any reorganization, recapitalization, merger or similar 
transactions; and to give proxies or powers of attorney with or without power 
of substitution to vote any securities or certificates of interest; and to consent 
to any contract, lease, mortgage, purchase or sale of property, by or between 
any corporation or person; 

(9) To deposit any security with any protective reorganization committee, 
and to delegate to such committee such powers and authority with relation 
thereto as the board may deem proper and to pay, out of the Trust property, 
such portion of expenses and compensation as the board may deem necessary 
and appropriate. 

(10) To carry property for accounting purposes other than acquisition date 
values; 

(11) To borrow money on such tenns and conditions and from such sources 
as the board deems advisable, to mortgage and pledge Trust assets as 
collateral; 

(12) To make distributions or divisions of principal in kind; 

(13) To comprise, attribute, defend, enforce, release, settle otherwise adjust 
claims in favor or against the Trust, including claims for taxes, and to accept 



174 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

any property, either in total or partial satisfaction of any indebtedness or 
other obligation, and subject to the provisions of this act, to continue to hold 
the same for such period of time as the board may deem appropriate. 

(14) To manage or improve real property; and to abandon any property 
which the board determined not to be worth retaining; 

(15) To hold all or part of the Trust property not invested for such purposes 
and for such time as the board may deem appropriate; 

( 1 6) To extend the time for payment for any obligations to the Trust; and 
XX_-5. Funds Paid to the Trust 

Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, all monies paid to 
the Trust in accordance with any zoning by-law, exaction fee, or private 
contributions shall be paid directly into the Trust and need not be 
appropriated or accepted and approved into the Trust. General revenues 
appropriated into the Trust become Trust property and to be expended these 
funds need not be further appropriated. All moneys remaining in the Trust at 
the end of the fiscal year, whether or not expended by the Board within one 
(1) year of the date they were appropriated into the Trust, remain Trust 
property. 

XX_-6. Liability 

Neither the Trustees nor any agent or officer of the Trust shall have the 
authority to bind the Town, except in the manner specifically authorized 
herein. The Trust is a public employer and the members of the Board are 
public employees for the purposes of MGL, Chapter 268A. The Trust shall 
be deemed a municipal agency and the Trustees special municipal 
employees, for purposes of MGL, Chapter 268 A. 
XX_-7. Taxes 

The Trust is exempt from MGL Chapters 59 and 62, and from any other 
provisions concerning payment of taxes based upon or measured by property 
or income imposed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or any political 
subdivision thereof. 
XX_-8. Board of the Town 

The Trust is a board of the Town of Randolph for the purposes of Chapter 
SOB and Section 15A of Chapter 40; but agreements and conveyances 
between the Trust and agencies, boards, commissions, authorities, 
departments and public instrumentalities of the Town shall be exempt from 
said Chapter SOB. 

XX -9. Treasurer/Collector as Custodian 

The Treasurer/Collector shall be the custodian of the Trust Fund's funds and 
shall maintain separate accounts and records for such funds. Any income or 
proceeds received from the investment of funds shall be credited to and 
become part of the Trust Fund. In accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 44, 55C, 
the books and records of the Trust shall be audited annually by an 
independent auditor in accordance with accepted accounting practices. 



175 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Council Order: 2012-025 
Small Commercial Exemption 
*This was rejected by the Council 

Be it Ordered that the Randolph Town Council authorizes an additional 
classification for real estate tax purposes. This classification shall be called 
"Small Business Exemption". 

The properties that will qualify for this exemption are those properties that 
are reported to the Town annually by the Massachusetts Department of 
Revenue. 

The current qualifications for this exemption are real property owners with a 
business with less than one million dollars ($1,000,000) in annual revenue 
and ten (10) or less employees. 

Council Order: 2012-026 
Establishing a Veterans' Council 
*Still pending before the Council 

The purpose of the Council under Massachusetts General Law c 1 15 is: 

To provide support for all Randolph Veterans and the Randolph Director of 

Veterans Services 

Serve as a liaison between Randolph Veterans and the Town Manager, Town 
Council and all other Randolph departments, boards and commissions. 
To promote the recognition and observance of all patriotic holidays to 
include, but not limited to: Memorial Day, Flag Day, the Fourth of July and 
Veterans Day 

To foster an understanding and appreciation within the Town of the 
achievements, contributions and sacrifices Veterans have made to the 
Community, State and Nation. 

The Randolph Veterans' council is comprised of eleven (11) members, 
including the Randolph Veteran's Agent. 

There will be one member from each of the Veterans' Posts located in 
Randolph, the balance of the members shall be appointed by the Town 
Manager. 

Council Order: 2012-027A 

Rezoning 374 North Main Street from Residential to Business 
Professional 

*Still pending before the Council 

The Town Council hereby rezones 374 North Main Street (46/ A/24) from 
Residential to Business Professional. 

The change is zoning is to allow a more appropriate transition from the 
Crawford Square Business District into the residential portion of North Main 
Street. 



176 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
Council Order: 2012-028 

Zoning Updates Relative to Rehabilitation Facilities, Assisted Living 
Facilities, Hospitals and Convalescent/Nursing Homes 
*Still pending before the Council 

Update definitions to include Rehabilitation Facility and adjust related uses 
in order to provide clarity for zoning. New definitions are in BOLD/ITALIC 
font. Existing definitions which should be amended are in strikethrough font 
with recommended changes detailed separately in BOLD/ITALIC 
200-3 Definitions 

Rehabilitation Facility - A free-standing facility or unit of contiguous 
dedicated beds & spaces within a licensed health service facility that 
provides short-term, inpatient or outpatient care, post-acute treatment and/or 
services to persons with functional limitations or chronic disabling conditions 
resulting from mental or physical injury. It uses a coordinated, integrated, 
interdisciplinary approach to assess, alleviate or ameliorate the disabling 
effects of illness through physical, psycho-social and cognitive treatment. 
This does not include facilities meeting the definition of HOSPITAL, 
NURSING/CONVALESCENT HOME. 

Assisted Living Facility - a facility licensed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts as a boarding home for people who have either a need for 
assistance with activities of daily living (defined as eating, toileting, 
ambulation, transfer and bathing) or some form of cognitive impairment but 
who do not need the skilled critical care provided by nursing/convalescent 
homes. 

Hospital - An establishment primarily engaged in providing diagnostic 
services, extensive medical treatment including surgical services, and other 
services, as well as continuous nursing services. The establishment has an 
organized medical staff on duty 24 hours a day, inpatient beds, and 
equipment and facilities to provide complete health care; may also provide 
emergency room care and less intensive medical uses by right, such as 
nursing homes, sanitariums, convalescent care, ambulatory care facilities, 
and homes for the aged. 

Hospital - A medical establishment licensed by the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts whose facilities provide in-patient accommodations for acute 
medical and surgical care; and other in-patient services for sick, ailing or 
injured persons; and including such related facilities as laboratories, 
outpatient departments, training facilities, central services, staff offices and 
residences that are integral with and accessory to the principle use. 
Nursing Home - a home licensed by the commonwealth which is used for the 
reception and care of senior and disabled individuals who by reason of illness 
or physical or mental disability require skilled nursing care. 



177 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Convalescent/Nursing Home - a medical facility licensed by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts providing accommodation and care to aged 
and infirm persons but not providing acute-care services. This definition 
excludes any facility meeting the definition HOSPITAL, 
REHABILITATION FACILITY 

Council Order: 2012-028A 

Table of Allowable Activity Updates Relative to Rehabilitation Facilities, 
Assisted Living Facilities, Hospitals and Convalescent/Nursing Homes 
*Still pending before the Council 

1) Update Table of Allowable Activity to add line items for Rehabilitation 
Facility and Assisted Living Facility 



200-3 Table of Allowable Activity 





C 


N 


W 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


I 


R 


R 


R 


R 


R 


B 


s 




S 


R 


C 


P 


R 


B 


D 


P 


D 


S 


S 


M 


2 


M 


H 


F 




B 


B 


B 


C 


H 


H 








H 


M 


F 


F 


F 


A 


D 




D 


D 


D 


C 


D 


D 








D 


D 


D 


D 


5 


D 

























D 


D 






5 














D 




















+ 


































D 






MEDICAL 


































Rehabili- 


N 


S 


S 


N 


N 


S 


S 


S 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


S 


N 


Tation 




P 


P 






P 


P 


P 














P 




Facility 




T 


T 






T 


T 


T 














T 








C 


C 






C 


C 


C 














C 




Assisted 


N 


s 


s 


N 


N 


S 


S 


s 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


N 


s 


N 


Living 




p 


p 






P 


P 


p 














p 




Facility 




T 


T 






T 


T 


T 














T 








C 


C 






C 


C 


C 














C 





2) Define criteria for special uses by amending section 200-46 
200-46 Specific Requirements for Particular Uses 
M. Rehabilitation Facility or Assisted Living Facility 
The Town Council, as the Special Permit Granting Authority, may, 
in its discretion, issue a special permit for a Rehabilitation Facility or 
Assisted Living Facility located within an applicable district if it 
determines that the particular use provides a significant benefit to the 
Town of Randolph, will not be injurious to the neighborhood in 
which it is located, nor to traffic and safety conditions therein, nor 
otherwise detrimental to the public safety and welfare. 
Notwithstanding the aforemenfioned, the following conditions must 
be met: 

1 . Lot size shall have a minimum of three (3) acres 

2. Site must have at least one property line abutting a major 
thoroughfare 



178 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



3. Where any required yard abuts a residential zone there shall 
be a forty (40) foot vegetated buffer which contains upright 
coniferous evergreens six (6) feet in height and twenty (20) feet 
on center 

4. Access to ambulance and delivery areas shall be directly 
from a major thoroughfare, not a secondary road. Areas shall be 
obscured from all adjacent residentially zoned districts through 
installation of fencing at least six (6) feet in height supplemented 
by landscaping. 

5. Garages for parking and storage of emergency and 
maintenance vehicles subject to the following conditions: 

a. Provided that such use is accessory to a principal 
hospital use; 

b. The minimum distance of any garage from any 
property line shall be fifty (50) feet. 

c. No garage may be located between the side of the 
principal building and the closest major 
thoroughfare. 

d. Garages must be designed to be architecturally 
compatible with the primary hospital building. 

Council Order: 2012-029 

Transfer of $282,886 from Certified Free Cash to Workers 
Compensation Trust Fund 

The Randolph Town Council hereby transfers an amount of $282,886 from 
Certified Free Cash of Fiscal Year 2012 to the Workers Compensation Trust 
Fund to address an FY 12 year-end deficit. 

Council Order: 2012-030 

Order to Amend Council Order 2012-013 Annual Cap on Recreation 
Department (53E Vi) Revolving Account 

The Randolph Town Council amends Council Order: 2012-013 and reduces 
the authorization for the Recreation Department Revolving Account (53E Vi) 
from $800,000 to $496,000. 

Council Order: 2012-031 

Rezoning 965 North Main Street from Residential to Business 
Professional 

The Town Council hereby rezones 965 North Main Street (12/1/068) from 
Residential to Business Professional. 



179 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Council Order: 2012-032 

Rezoning 967 North Main Street from Residential to Business 
Professional 

The Town Council hereby rezones 967 North Main Street (1 2/1/069. C) from 
Residential to Business Professional. 

Council Order: 2012-033 

Rezoning 969 North Main Street from Residential to Business 
Professional 

The Town Council hereby rezones 969 North Main Street (12/1/070.1) from 
Residential to Business Professional. 



180 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




West Street entrance to the new dog park 



181 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - March 6, 2012 
DEMOCRATIC 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 | Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Total Machine Counted Ballots 


77 


62 


96 


109 


80 


Total Hand Counted Ballots 


A 
U 


ft 


1 








lotai Daiiots 


II 


62 


97 1 109 


80 


Presidential Preference - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Barack Obama 


65 


54 


75 


88 


62 


No Preference 


6 


3 


12 


12 


10 


Scattered write ins 


1 


1 


2 





4 


bianKs 


c 

J 


A 

4 


8 


9 


4 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


11 


62 


97 


109 


80 


oldie i^uiiiiiiiiicc itidii voic lur wnii 


Precmct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Michael C. Joyce 


01 


45 


80 


92 


0/ 


Scattered write ins 




1 
1 


1 





1 


DldlUtS 


ID 


ID 


16 


17 


n 
11 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


77 


62 


97 


109 


80 


Male Lomniittee woman - vote tor ViSl 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Marilyn D. Sullivan 


56 


44 


78 


88 


64 


Scattered write ins 





2 


1 





2 


Blanks 


21 


16 


18 


21 


14 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


11 


62 


97 


109 


80 


Town Committee - Vote for No more than 35 


Precinct I 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Brian P. Howard 


50 


37 


70 


73 


56 


Paul K. Femandes 


51 


38 


67 


65 


52 


James F. Burgess, Jr. 


37 


37 


61 


70 


53 


Paul J. Meoni 


45 


35 


55 


64 


53 


Andrew L. Azei 


40 


34 


63 


63 


51 


Irene Romano 


37 


32 


52 


67 


45 


Ken Clifton 


49 


36 


70 


53 


43 


David Harris Jr. 


41 


34 


54 


56 


46 


Keith E. Wortzman 


31 


29 


50 


52 


45 


Toby Lynne Schwartz 


31 


30 


54 


53 


43 


Gloria M. Solon 


33 


30 


50 


58 


43 


Ida V. Gordon 


31 


33 


47 


50 


45 


Sandra Slavet 


30 


29 


50 


50 


43 


Kevin Coleman Joyce 


28 


29 


46 


52 


46 


Suzanne M. Williams 


30 


29 


50 


54 


45 


Cheryl L. Aldrich 


31 


31 


44 


53 


45 


Judith A. Conway 


30 


28 


47 


55 


44 


Kit A. Hoffman 


26 


29 


45 


48 


41 


Eileen R. Singleton 


33 


29 


47 


54 


45 


Emmanuel A. Mecha 


31 


31 


50 


53 


43 


Thomas A. Kidd 


28 


29 


45 


48 


42 


George L. Berdos 


24 


30 


48 


53 


43 


llona Cutler 


26 


28 


46 


49 


38 


Claritza N. Abreu 


33 


29 


45 


51 


40 


Robert L. Keighton 


26 


28 


49 


48 


41 


Scattered write ins 








2 


2 





Blanks 


1843 


1386 


2088 


2421 


1669 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


2695 2170 3395 3815 2800 



184 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


77 


69 


134 


99 


88 


111 


97 


1099 


1 














1 





3 


78 


69 


134 


99 


88 


112 


97 


1102 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


64 


56 


117 


86 


70 


83 


68 


000 


7 


10 


13 


11 


15 


16 


Z 1 


1 JO 


2 


1 


1 








3 


•J 

J 


10 


5 


2 


3 


2 


3 


10 


5 


60 


78 


69 


134 


99 


88 


112 


97 


1102 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


67 


53 


110 


85 


65 


89 


83 


897 


2 





1 


1 





1 


2 


10 


9 


16 


23 


13 


23 


22 


12 


195 


78 


69 


134 


99 


88 


112 


97 


1102 




Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


64 


49 


104 


79 


66 


87 


77 


856 


1 





1 





1 


2 


1 


11 


13 


20 


29 

- 


20 


2! 


23 


19 


235 


78 


69 


134 


99 


88 


112 


97 


1102 


Precinct o 


Precinct 7 


^^^^^^ 

Precinct 8 


Precinct " 


Precinct lU 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


Jl 


< 1 

ji 


fi/i 


m 


bi 


Q 1 


16 


77/1 


jU 


'^') 
JL 


oU 


ou 


«c 

jj 


77 

/ / 


00 


/ 1 J 


50 


47 


79 


60 


47 


79 


68 


688 


48 


52 


75 


64 


53 


74 


59 


611 


49 


44 


82 


60 


52 


66 


56 


660 


37 


40 


68 


53 


37 


61 


56 


585 


34 


33 


64 


46 


38 


63 


44 


573 


36 


35 


66 


52 


44 


59 


48 


571 


39 


39 


84 


55 


38 


57 


46 


565 


42 


37 


71 


50 


42 


58 


48 


559 


40 


36 


73 


55 


40 


56 


41 


555 


37 


35 


68 


52 


37 


59 


48 


542 


43 


32 


79 


48 


36 


54 


46 


540 


34 


34 


63 


48 


40 


59 


49 


528 


36 


34 


62 


43 


39 


56 


42 


520 


33 


34 


65 


48 


36 


56 


44 


520 


34 


32 


62 


45 


33 


60 


48 


518 


37 


35 


62 


47 


37 


56 


46 


509 


38 


28 


60 


46 


34 


53 


41 


508 


33 


29 


61 


43 


33 


56 


41 


504 


35 


32 


59 


45 


34 


52 


43 


492 


33 


29 


55 


41 


30 


55 


46 


487 


38 


30 


58 


45 


30 


55 


43 


486 


33 


29 


55 


44 


32 


53 


40 


484 


32 


28 


56 


44 


28 


53 


39 


472 








9 


1 





2 


2 


18 


1757 


1508 


2980 


2201 


2092 


2410 


2167 


24522 


2730 


2415 


4690 


3465 


3080 


3920 


3395 


38570 



185 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - March 6, 2012 
GREEN-RAINBOW 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Total Machine Counted Ballots 














2 


Total Hand Counted Ballots 

















Total Ballots 














2 


Presidential Preference - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Jill Stein 














1 


No Preference 














1 


Kent Mesplay 

















Harley Mikkelson 

















Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 














2 


State Committee Man - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 














1 


Blanks 














1 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 














2 


State Committee Woman- Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 














1 


Blanks 














1 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 














2 


Town Committee - Vote for No more than 10 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 














20 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 














20 





186 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




187 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - March 6, 2012 
REPUBLICAN 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Total Machine Counted Ballots 


98 


74 


103 


125 


102 


Total Hand Counted Ballots 

















Total Ballots 


98 


74 


103 


125 


102 




Presidential Preference - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Mitt Romney 


70 


53 


73 


83 


76 


Rick Santorum 


15 


7 


14 


18 


14 


Ron Paul 


8 


9 


14 


13 


7 


Newt Gingnch 


4 


3 


1 


9 


3 


No Preference 





1 





1 


1 


Jon Hunstman 





1 











Michele Bachman 


1 








1 


1 


Rick Perry 








1 








Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


98 


74 


103 


125 


102 




State Committee Man - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Thomas W. Stanton 


44 


21 


47 


44 


48 


Vaughan F. Enokian 


16 


12 


17 


26 


17 


John F. Cruz 


16 


13 


18 


24 


17 


Scattered write ins 








1 








Blanks 


22 


28 


20 


31 


20 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


98 


74 


103 


125 


102 




State Committee Woman - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Mimi Sundstrora 


60 


41 


63 


78 


65 


Scattered write ins 








1 


1 


1 


Blanks 


38 


33 


39 


46 


36 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


98 


74 


103 


125 


102 




Town Committee - Vote for No more than 35 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


James D. Curtis 


49 


40 


55 


74 


57 


Susan F. Curtis 


46 


35 


59 


68 


56 


LallieP.Falls 


36 


28 


47 


64 


49 


Jean Riguel Ulysse 


35 


29 


52 


65 


45 


Mark Kittredge 








4 








Scattered write ins 


1 








4 


3 


Blanks 


3263 


2458 


3388 


4100 


3360 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


3430 


2590 


3605 


4375 


3570 



188 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


106 


108 


78 


90 


110 


132 


124 


1250 


1 


1 

















2 


1 107 


109 


78 


90 


110 


132 


124 


1252 




1 Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


72 


79 


52 


60 


74 


104 


82 


878 


12 


13 


9 


17 


16 


15 


20 


170 


15 


12 


7 


6 


9 


4 


17 


121 


4 


5 


7 


7 


7 


3 


4 


57 


1 





2 





2 


4 





12 


1 





1 





2 


1 


1 


7 


1 














1 





5 


1 




















2 


















































1 107 


109 


78 


90 


110 


132 


124 


1252 




1 Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


46 


54 


32 


34 


57 


57 


53 


537 


16 


17 


17 


8 


20 


26 


19 


211 


24 


16 


11 


16 


8 


20 


13 


196 


2 








1 





2 





6 


19 


22 


18 


31 


25 


27 


39 


302 


1 107 


109 


78 


90 


110 


132 


124 


1252 




1 Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


64 


80 


45 


52 


63 


82 


76 


769 








3 


1 





2 





9 


43 


29 


30 


37 


47 


48 


48 


474 


107 


109 


78 


90 


110 


132 


124 


1252 




1 Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


53 


66 


44 


47 


67 


75 


62 


689 


50 


67 


41 


44 


60 


77 


65 


668 


50 


61 


34 


38 


47 


63 


52 


569 


46 


61 


37 


38 


51 


62 


45 


566 


4 


1 

















9 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


17 


3540 


3558 


2572 


2982 


3624 


4342 


4115 


41302 


1 3745 


3815 


2730 


3150 


3850 


4620 


4340 


43820 





189 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - September 6, 2012 
DEMOCRATIC 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Total Machine Counted Ballots 


120 


136 


155 


156 


119 


Total Hand Counted Ballots 





1 











Total Ballots 


120 


137 


155 


156 


119 




Senator in Congress- Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Elizabeth A. Warren 


105 


118 


130 


139 


100 


No Preference 


u 


A 
\J 


(\ 
u 


u 


A 
U 


Scattered write ins 


1 


1 


1 

i 


L 


i 


Dianxs 


14 


1 1 


LL 


1 c 

15 


Id 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


120 


137 


155 


156 


119 


Representative in Congress - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Michael E. Capuano 


96 


114 


121 


123 


102 


Scattered wnte ins 








2 


3 





Blanks 


24 


23 


32 


30 


17 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


120 


137 


155 


156 


119 


CouncUlor- Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Brian M. Clinton 


23 


26 


30 


20 


18 


Robert L. Jubinville 


50 


46 


57 


67 


46 


Patrick J. McCabe 


4 


6 


1 


7 


9 


Bart Andrew Timilty 


il 


A(. 

40 


IC 

Jo 


48 


il 


Scattered write ms 


U 


U 


U 




A 
U 


DianKs 


1 1 


1 1 

li 


i\ 


14 


Q 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 




1 11 

lil 


15S 

l^^ 


ISA 
150 


110 
11? 


Senator in General Court - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Brian A. Joyce 


106 


120 


131 


137 


111 


Scattered wnte ins 








1 


3 





uldllKS 


It 


17 


li 


10 





Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


iin 
uU 


lil 




ISA 
150 


110 


Representative in General Court - v ote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Walter F. Timilty 


96 


121 


120 






Mark J. Cusack 








123 




Bruce J Ayers 












Scattered write ins 


1 
1 


1 
1 


2 


1 


U 


tJianxs 


Li 




a 


il 


1 V 

1 J 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


liv 


HI 


135 


ISA 
150 


110 


Clerk of Courts - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Walter F. TimiltvJr. 


93 


114 


121 


127 


107 


Scattered write ins 





2 


1 


2 





Blanks 


27 


21 


33 


27 


12 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


120 


137 


155 


156 


119 


Register of Deeds - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


William P. O'Donnell 


85 


112 


113 


120 


103 


Scattered write ins 





1 


1 








Blanks 


35 


24 


41 


36 


16 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


120 


137 


155 


156 


119 



190 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




191 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - September 6, 2012 
GREEN - RAINBOW 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Total Machine Counted Ballots 

















Total Hand Counted Ballots 

















Total BaUots 



















Senator in Congress- Vote for ONE 


Precmct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


No Preference 

















Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 

















Representative in Congress - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 

















Councillor - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 

















Senator in General Court - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 





Representative in General Court - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered wnte ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 









Clerk of Courts -Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 







Register of Deeds - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct ^ 


Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 





County Commissioner - Vote For NO more than TWO 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 

















Blanks 

















Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 






192 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


1 




















1 








1 








1 





2 


1 1 





1 








1 





3 




Prppinrt 


Prpfinrf 7 




Prppinrt 


Prpplnpt 1 


Pfppinpt 1 1 
11 Cllllll 1 1 


Prprin^^t 1 '1 
rictllltl 11 


Total 


U 


A 
U 


u 


A 
U 


U 


A 
U 


A 
U 


A 
U 







Q 





Q 


] 


Q 


2 


U 


u 


1 


A 
U 


A 

U 


A 
U 


A 
U 


1 


1 





1 








1 





3 


rictiiRi u 


Prppinpt 7 


rivtiiiii 


Prppinpf 

ri ciiiici 7 


ricLlNll lU 


Prppinpf 1 1 




Total 


1 








Q 


Q 


] 


Q 


2 








1 





Q 








1 


1 





1 








1 





3 


riciiiKi u 


Prpi^inpt 7 
ricviiici / 


Pfppini^t Q 
ri cLiiiti 


rictiiiti 7 


n CllNll lU 


Prppinpf 1 1 


"recinct 12 


Total 


1 


Q 


Q 


Q 


Q 


[ 


Q 


2 





Q 


j 





Q 


Q 


Q 


1 


1 





1 








1 





3 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


1 














] 





2 








1 














1 


1 





1 








1 





3 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 1 1 


Precinct 12 


Total 


1 














1 





2 








1 














1 


1 





1 








1 





3 


Prprinr t d 


Prpfinrt 7 


Prprinrf }i 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 1 1 


Precinct 12 


Total 


1 













1 





2 








1 
















1 





1 








1 





3 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


1 














1 





2 








1 














1 


1 





1 








1 





3 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


1 




















1 


1 





2 








2 





5 


2 





2 








2 





6 



193 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - September 6, 2012 
REPUBLICAN 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Total Machine Counted Ballots 


43 


21 


32 


36 


37 


Total Hand Counted Ballots 

















Total Ballots 


43 


21 


32 


36 


37 




Senator in Congress- Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


^rntf P Rrnwn 


43 


21 


ji 


jD 


J / 


i>u riciciciitc 




u 




n 
u 


n 

V 


JLaUClCU WIllC Ulo 





Q 





Q 


Q 


Blanks 








1 








Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


43 


21 


32 


36 


37 


Representative in Congress - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


jUuUCICU WIllC Ilia 


7 


4 


2 


4 


4 


Blanks 


36 


17 


30 


32 


33 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


43 


21 


32 


36 


37 


Councillor - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


lidii n. oiiuiicY 


?x 

zo 


1^ 
1 J 


10 


LL 


19 


^pattprpH wntp in^ 

















Blanks 


15 


8 


16 


14 


8 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


43 


21 


32 


36 


37 


Senator in General Court - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 


5 


4 


1 






Blanks 


38 


17 


31 


31 


34 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


43 


21 


32 


36 


37 


Representative in General Court - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 


5 


4 





4 


3 


Blanks 


38 


17 


32 


32 


34 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


43 


21 


32 


36 


37 


Clerk of Courts - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 


4 


3 


1 






Blanks 


39 


18 


31 


34 


34 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


43 


21 


32 


36 


3' 


Register of Deeds - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 


4 


3 


1 


2 


4 


Blanks 


39 


18 


31 


34 




Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


43 


21 


32 


36 


37 


County Commissioner - Vote For NO more than TWO 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scattered write ins 


5 


4 









Blanks 


81 


38 


64 


70 


69 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


86 42 64 72 74 



194 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




195 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



STATE ELECTION - November 6, 2012 





Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Total Machine Counted Ballots 


1281 


1177 


1177 


1322 


1173 


Total Hand Counted Ballots 


6 


6 


8 


9 


6 


Total BaUots 


1287 


1183 


1185 


1331 


in9 




Electors of President and VP- Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Johnson and Gray 


4 


3 


7 


10 




Obama and Biden 


967 


952 


899 


997 


861 


Romney and Ryan 


304 


221 


277 


316 


302 


Stein and Honkala 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


Scattered wnte ins 


4 


2 





2 


3 


Blanks 


5 


2 


1 


5 


4 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


1287 


1183 


1185 


1331 


1179 


Senator in Congress- Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Scott P. Brown 


371 


284 


361 


399 


386 


Elizabeth A. Warren 


909 


883 


817 


926 


788 


Scattered write ins 


1 


U 


1 


1 


1 


Blanks 





ID 


c 

J 


c 
5 


4 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


1287 


1183 


1185 


1331 


1179 


Representative in Congress - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Michael E. Capuano 


892 


843 


808 


951 


840 


Karia Romero 


240 


193 


237 


239 


193 


Scattered wnte ins 




1 
I 


4 


A 


1 


DianKs 


ui 


145 




1 A 1 

141 


143 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


1287 


1183 


1185 


1331 


1179 


Councillor -Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Robert L. Jubinville 


899 


834 


826 


948 


822 


tari H. snoiley 




1 CI 


loo 


18/ 


loj 


Scattered wnte ins 


-) 


I 


J 


A 
U 


3 


Dlamcs 


ZUi 


m 


loo 


1% 


1/1 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


11C7 

Izo/ 




1185 


nil 
IjJl 




Senator in General Court - Vote tor ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Brian A. Joyce 


1070 


980 


987 


1102 


1001 


Scattered write ins 


3 


4 


8 


10 


5 


DianKs 




too 


1Qfl 

lyu 




1 ij 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


1287 


1183 


1185 


1331 


1179 


Representative in General Court - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Walter r. iimiity 


lUZD 




you 






Mark J. Cusack 








1015 




Bruce J Avers 










933 


Scattered write ins 


3 


4 


6 


9 


10 


Blanks 


258 


227 


219 


307 


236 


Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


1287 


1183 


1185 


1331 


1179 


Clerk of Courts - Vote for ONE 


Precinct 1 


Precinct 2 


Precinct 3 


Precinct 4 


Precinct 5 


Walter F.TimiltyJr. 


989 


919 


924 


1058 


949 


Scattered write ins 


3 


6 


10 


9 


5 


Blanks 


295 


258 


251 


264 




Total Votes ( Including Blanks) 


1287 


1183 


1185 


1331 


1179 



196 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



1 Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


1110 


1289 


1336 


1210 


1315 


1360 


1332 


15082 


3 


13 


10 


7 


23 


13 


5 


109 


1 1113 


1302 


1346 


1217 


1338 


1373 


1337 


15191 




Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 1 1 


Precinct 12 


Tnfa\ 

1 oiai 


c 

J 


4 


18 


5 


6 


10 


14 


93 




ym 


IUjj 


yoi 








WAAt 

11441 


256 


325 


258 


223 


337 


358 


375 


3552 


2 


5 


8 


T 


1 


9 


3 


40 


1 


2 


3 


3 





1 


2 


23 


6 


2 


4 


1 


4 


5 


3 


42 


1113 


1302 


1346 


1217 


IJjo 


ij /J 




15191 


I 1 CtlllLl u 


Prprinrt 7 


Prprinrf k 


I 1 CCllll-l 7 


Prppinpt in 
ricLIIKl lU 


nci-lllil 1 1 


rictllltl Ih 


Total 


317 


406 


344 


277 


429 


454 


468 


4496 


785 


883 


996 


932 


901 


905 


855 


10580 


1 


1 





1 











8 


10 


12 


6 


7 


8 


14 


14 


107 


1113 


1302 


1346 


1217 


1338 


1373 


1337 


15191 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 




ooO 


992 


884 


935 


932 


892 


lUoj; 


204 


263 


212 


210 


276 


263 


280 


2810 


3 


3 


3 


2 


4 


3 


4 


31 


124 


150 


139 


121 


123 


175 


161 


1713 


1113 


1302 


1346 


1217 


1338 


1373 


1337 


15191 


Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


785 


882 


976 


918 


939 


916 


877 


10622 


166 


215 


169 


136 


225 


221 


247 


2254 




4 


3 


3 


5 


3 


6 


38 


160 


201 


198 


160 


169 


233 


207 


2277 


1113 


1302 


1346 1217 1338 1373 1337 


15191 




Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 


916 


1055 


1129 


1049 


1144 


1133 


1084 


12650 


11 


8 


11 


7 


10 


8 


12 


97 


186 


239 


206 


161 


184 


232 


241 


2444 


1113 


1302 


1346 


1217 


1338 


1373 


1337 


15191 




Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 11 


Precinct 12 


Total 




1014 


1078 


999 


1095 






7124 
















1015 


889 










1067 


1054 


3943 


9 


11 


10 


4 


7 


8 


12 


93 


215 


277 


258 


214 


236 


298 


271 


3016 


1 1113 


1302 


1346 


1217 


1338 


1373 


1337 


15191 




1 Precinct 6 


Precinct 7 


Precinct 8 


Precinct 9 


Precinct 10 


Precinct 1 1 


Precinct 12 


Total 


886 


993 


1049 


977 


1092 


1061 


1058 


11955 


10 


8 


11 


6 


6 


10 


8 


92 


217 


301 


286 


234 


240 


302 


271 


3144 


1 1113 


1302 


1346 


1217 


1338 


1373 


1337 


15191 



197 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




198 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 





The procession of fire apparatus leading the parade is a favorite tradition 



199 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




Town leaders, some with their children, participate annually greeting the crowds 
that line North Main Street for the parade 



200 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
REPORT OF THE RANDOLPH PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

The Randolph Pubhc Schools has made significant improvements this 
year, including gains in elementary MCAS scores, the launch of 
Freshman Academy, the creation of AIM Academy, and a three-year 
Elementary and Secondary School Counseling grant award. 

In 2011-2012, the Randolph Public Schools continued implementing 
its state-approved Accelerated Plan. The plan focuses on three things: 

1 . High quality learning and teaching 

2. Professional development for staff 

3. Accountability for staff, schools, and the district. 

By focusing on these three areas, the district hoped to see 
improvement in student performance. While there is room for 
improvement, the results of the spring 2012 MCAS show some 
progress. The district's elementary schools made impressive growth. 
The middle and high schools did not see increases overall, but are on 
track to make gains on the 2013 MCAS. 

The district was pleased to learn that it met the state set target for its 
Progress and Performance Index (PPI). The Massachusetts 
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education uses PPI to 
measure the improvement of each district and school. The PPI 
combines information about closing the gaps between student 
performance, and graduation and dropout rates. The district went from 
a PPI score of 39 in 201 1 to a much-improved score of 64 for 2012. 

Much of the gains are due to the focus on professional development, 
which is a cornerstone of the Accelerated Plan. All administrators are 
engaged in professional development to help them recognize and 
promote quality instruction. Teachers are engaged in professional 
development on high quality instruction, assessment and data analysis. 
At the school level, teachers are giving benchmark assessments and 
learning to use data to guide their instruction. They are engaged in 
using the "Randolph Way", the district's new set of teaching and 
learning behaviors that draw from the Department of Elementary and 
Secondary Education's Characteristics of a Standards Based 
Classroom. All teachers and administrators have been trained in the 
"Randolph Way." 



201 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Principals are using formative assessments to identify strengths and 
weaknesses in their schools and to work in areas of need. An 
''Opportunity to Learn" (OTL) protocol was developed and is now 
used in 100% of the schools. OTL is a less formal and more 
personalized introductory way for teachers to provide timely and 
appropriate intervention and support to students in Randolph. The 
OTL process is put into effect when a teacher has a concern about a 
student. All available data on that student is assembled and a team is 
convened to discuss the student's strengths and area for improvement. 
Weekly OTL meetings are led by administrators and result in action 
plans to address students' identified needs. All administrators received 
professional development in leading the Opportunity to Learn protocol 
and have been facilitating meetings with teachers. 

Every school holds grade level team meetings called Common 
Planning Time (CPT) three times a week for each team. CPT 
meetings are led by an administrator and are used as a time to work on 
curriculum, assessment and instruction. Additionally, the District and 
School Assistance Centers 

On June 28, 2011 the Massachusetts Board of Elementary and 
Secondary Education adopted new regulations to guide the evaluation 
of all educators serving in positions requiring a license — teachers, 
principals, superintendents, and other administrators. The regulations 
are designed first and foremost to promote leaders' and teachers' 
growth and development. They place student learning at the center of 
the process using multiple measures of student learning. This includes 
a new focus on Family Engagement, an area that has not previously 
been assessed as part of the evaluation process. 

By 2013-14, every district in the Commonwealth will be phasing in 
evaluation processes and procedures that are consistent with the new 
regulations. RPS has provided a series of Professional Development 
opportunities a representative number of Randolph teachers, principals 
and administrators who turn are sharing what they learn with other 
teachers in their schools. To support teachers, principals, and 
administrators in meeting the expectations on the new evaluation, the 
Office of Family and Community Relations developed a professional 
development series on family engagement. 



202 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



There have also been new programs put in place at the elementary and 
secondary levels. RPS will receive a three-year Elementary and 
Secondary School Counseling grant to implement a project called 
Asset Based Culture (ABC), which will serve 1,500 students in the 
district's four elementary schools. Through the grant, the district will 
hire additional mental health professionals (school counselors) who 
will implement the state model for school counseling programs. The 
work will include a guidance curriculum, running small groups, seeing 
students individually and running programs for parents. The district is 
pleased to be one of the sixty recipients of this grant. 

The district revamped the alternative education program that served 
grades 7-12. The middle school program was merged with the high 
school program and moved to Randolph High to form AIM Academy. 
The program is working to use competency-based curriculum and 
assessments to support individualized learning and self-pacing to meet 
the needs of over-age and struggling students. Students receive 
instructional opportunities and experiences that will prepare them for 
college and career readiness. New staff helped to create a positive 
school culture and climate, and increase student achievement and 
attendance. The Rockport Company made a commitment to design 
and implement a computer lab to support AIM. The program is on 
track to have its first two graduates in spring 2013. 

RHS also received a one-year grant from the Nellie Mae Foundation to 
launch the Freshman Academy. Freshman Academy was launched to 
address the need for a stronger transition into the ninth grade for 
incoming eighth graders. The model includes Saturday academic 
support for struggling students. 

The district has continued its efforts to engage the community as 
partners. The Randolph Public Learning Community (RPLC) was 
launched establishing a group of families, educators, and community 
members who would work together to develop and implement 
solutions to some of the challenges impacting RPS. The RPLC 
determined that it would support the selection and implementation of a 
district wide family engagement strategy that would impact student 
learning. The RPLC is on track to select a strategy in spring 2013 and 



203 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

to work with the district on implementation of the strategy starting in 
September 2013. 

Additionally, a number of community partnerships have allowed the 
district to offer resources to students, families and the community. 
One of the highest profile partners was the United Way of 
Massachusetts Bay and Merrimack Valley, which asked RPS to 
continue to serve as one of its Thanksgiving Assistance Project sites. 
The project resulted in 500 Randolph families receiving Thanksgiving 
groceries. 

The Randolph Chamber of Commerce and the Randolph- Avon Rotary 
Club have worked closely with the school system, both providing a 
seat for the district in their organizations. They have also provided 
significant support for students by support school events and providing 
student scholarships. 

Wonderful things are happening in our schools every day. We are 
proud of our students' accomplishments in academics, music, art, 
athletics, community service and more. We are grateful for the support 
and effort of the staff, town, community members, families, and 
partners, who make our continuous improvement and growth possible. 
We look forward to continued achievement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Oscar Santos, Superintendent of Schools 



204 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE BLUE HILLS REGIONAL DISTRICT 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

The Blue Hills Regional District School Committee is pleased to 
submit its Annual Report to the residents of the Town of Randolph. 

Blue Hills Regional Technical School continues its commitment to 
provide high caliber academic and vocational instruction to district 
students in grades nine through twelve, and to others through 
postgraduate training. The nine towns in the district include Avon, 
Braintree, Canton, Dedham, Holbrook, Milton, Norwood, Randolph, 
and Westwood. 

Mr. James P. Quaglia is the Superintendent-Director. Mr. Richard 
Riman served as the Randolph representative on the Blue Hills 
Regional District School Committee until Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, 
when Marybeth Nearen was elected to fill the position. Mr. Riman did 
not seek re-election. 

The Committee meets on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 
7:00 p.m. in the William T. Buckley District School Committee 
Meeting Room (Room 207 A) at the school at 800 Randolph St., 
Canton. The public is invited to attend. The following members 
comprised the 2010-201 1 / 201 1-2012 School Committee: 

AVON: Francis J. Fistori 

BRAINTREE: Germano John Silveira 

CANTON: Aidan G. Maguire, Jr. (Vice Chairman) 

DEDHAM: Joseph A. Pascarella (Chairman) 

HOLBROOK: Robert S. Austin (Secretary) (Mr. Austin did not seek 
re-election. Mr. Robert A. McNeil was elected to the position on Nov. 
6, 2012. Mr. Charles W. Flahive was elected Secretary by the District 
School Committee on Nov. 20, 2012.) 

MILTON: Festus Joyce 



205 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



NORWOOD: Kevin L. Connolly 

RANDOLPH: Richard Riman (Mr. Riman did not seek re-election. 
Marybeth Nearen was elected to the position on Nov. 6, 2012.) 

WESTWOOD: Charles W. Flahive (elected Secretary by the District 
School Committee on Nov. 20, 2012) 

District School Committee members Mr. Richard Riman of Randolph 
and Mr. Robert S. Austin of Holbrook did not seek re-election in 
November 2012. Their seats were filled by Mrs. Marybeth Nearen of 
Randolph and Mr. Robert A. McNeil of Holbrook, both of whom were 
elected on Nov. 6, 2012. Mr. Kevin L. Connolly of Norwood, Mr. 
Festus Joyce of Milton, and Mr. Charles W. Flahive won re-election to 
their respective seats. 

Late in 2004, Gov. Mitt Romney announced the inception of the John 
and Abigail Adams Scholarships, which are given to high school 
students in recognition of their outstanding MCAS scores. The 
scholarships entitle the recipients to four years of free tuition at any 
University of Massachusetts campus or any participating state or 
community college in Massachusetts. Fifty-three members of the 
Class of 2012 earned this prestigious honor, the largest number of 
Adams Scholars that Blue Hills has ever had, including 28 students 
from Randolph. 

On November 13, 2012, Blue Hills hosted its annual Open House. 
This event allows the public to visit classrooms and vocational areas, 
speak with students, teachers, and administrators. It enables a firsthand 
appreciation about the variety of vocational training opportunities 
offered, and the extensive resources that Blue Hills offers its students. 

Seventy-seven Blue Hills students participated in the SkillsUSA 
District III Championships held on Tuesday, March 7, 2012 at J. P. 
Keefe Technical High School in Framingham. SkillsUSA is a national 
organization for vocational students which holds competitions in 
scores of technical categories at the local, district, state, and national 
levels. The students collectively brought home 25 medals and deserve 
tremendous credit for their hard work, expertise and dedication. The 



206 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



medalists included these Randolph students: Jasmine Hernandez, 
Bronze in Advertising Design; Morandah Destouche, Bronze in Nurse 
Assisting; N'Dea Jackson, Silver in Office Computer Apps; Meridith 
Berman, Gold in Preschool Teaching Assistant; and Heather Blackley, 
Silver, Technical Drafting. 

On Thursday, March 22, 2012, 21 new members were inducted into 
the William A. Dwyer Chapter of the National Honor Society at Blue 
Hills. They included Randolph students Anne Marie Gilbert, 
Rondeesha Lee, 

Shedly Louis-Charles, Meridith Berman, Leila Chow, Gabrielle 
Elcock, Jayme Gordon, Taysiman Haque, N'Dea Jackson, Brittany 
Lynch, and Marriah Michel. The NHS officers included Randolph 
students Esther Eugene (President), Keny German (Treasurer), and 
Briana Fuertes (Secretary). 

Keny German of Randolph, a senior in Engineering Technology at 
Blue Hills, was selected as the school's Outstanding Vocational- 
Technical Student of the Year. He was Valedictorian of the Class of 
2012. 

Each month on the home page of the school's website, 
www.bluehills.org , two Students of the Month are featured. 
Nominated by teachers, staff or administrators, they typify the very 
best of what Blue Hills is all about - outstanding scholarship, great 
school spirit, excellent attendance record, and they are respected by 
peers and faculty alike. Randolph students chosen for this recognition 
in 2012 were Ariana Chappelle, Jennifer Ross, Keny German, Valeria 
Sigarrostegui, and Derek Cahill. 

At the Senior Scholarship and Awards Night on Wednesday, May 23, 
2012, dozens of seniors received scholarships, tool awards and grants. 
Blue Hills is grateful to all the individuals and various civic and 
municipal organizations that generously recognized these deserving 
young men and women. 

It was an outstanding year for sports at Blue Hills. The Warriors 
varsity football team was honored at the State House for winning the 
Eastern Mass. Division 4A Super Bowl in 2011; they won the Mass. 



207 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Vocational Small Schools Football title over Minuteman in 2012; the 
boys' soccer team qualified for the MIAA tournament; the girls' 
soccer team qualified for the State Vocational and Eastern Mass. 
tournaments; the coed swimming team was Commonwealth Athletic 
Conference champion; the hockey team was Mayflower League 
champion and qualified for the Eastern Mass. tournament; the girls' 
basketball team was the Mayflower League champion, the State 
Vocational champion, and finalists in the Eastern Mass. tournament; 
the boys' basketball team qualified for the Eastern Mass. tournament; 
and the boys' track team was the League champion. Also, Athletic 
Director and Head Football Coach Ed Catabia was chosen as the 
Eastern Massachusetts Association of Interscholastic Football 
Officials 2012 Coach of the Year. 

Senior Vincent Burton of Randolph, a member of the Warriors varsity 
football team, had an exceptional year on the gridiron. He scored 258 
points, ran for 2,159 yards, carried the ball 373 times, and scored 36 
touchdowns. In Burton's entire football career at Blue Hills, he scored 
650 points, rushed for 5,530 yards, carried the ball 996 times, and 
scored 90 touchdowns. He deserves the warmest congratulations for 
his prolific achievements. 

Eighteen juniors in the Health Assisting program at Blue Hills were 
awarded their Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) credentials on 
Wednesday, June 6, 2012. The honorees included these Randolph 
students: Mevsline Camille, Jennifer Charles, Treseme Clark, 
Morandah Destouche, Semsarah Faustin, Vanessa Francois, Valentina 
Guillaume, Amber Lindsay, Shedly Louis-Charles, Jenessa Merard, 
Kristen Peterson, Valerie Rodriguez, Christelle Salomon, and Paige 
Szydlowski. 

Two hundred students in the Class of 2012 graduated on Tuesday, 
June 12, 2012. Eighty-five of the graduates were from Randolph. A 
memorable highlight of the occasion was the keynote speech by Scott 
D. Tingle of Randolph, a member of the Blue Hills Class of 1983. 
Tingle, a Commander in the U.S. Navy, became a NASA astronaut in 
November 2011. "We need you to excel," Tingle exhorted the 
graduates. "We need you to travel your incredible journey by setting 
goals that will guide you through your toughest challenges and lead 



208 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

you to your own personal successes. Judging by the successes we've 
already seen, just keep doing what you are doing, and the sky will 
never be a limit." 

As of October 1, 2012, there were 817 students enrolled at Blue Hills. 
Two hundred seventy-two of them were from Randolph. 

Thirty-nine men and women graduated from the Practical Nursing 
Program (Postsecondary Programs Division) at its 23^^ Annual 
Commencement at Blue Hills on Wednesday, June 27, 2012. There 
were six graduates from Randolph. This superb program earned 
accreditation from the Council on Occupational Education in 2012. 

Within confines of their vocational curriculum. Blue Hills students 
provide Cosmetology, Culinary, Early Education and Care, 
Construction services, Graphics and Automotive services to the district 
residents at below commercial cost. In some cases they have extended 
these service to local government and non- profits. This practice 
allows students to gain practical hands-on experience in conjunction 
with their classroom work. Over the years, residents, civic and 
municipal groups in the school's Member Towns have saved 
considerable money by having Blue Hills students provide services for 
them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marybeth Nearen 

Randolph Representative 

Blue Hills Regional Technical School District 

December 31, 2012 



209 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE RANDOLPH POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Nearly three years ago, I took my oath of office as your poUce chief I 
made many promises to our residents and the members of the 
Randolph Police Department that night. I promised our residents that 
the department would strive to continue to reduce the crime rate, 
provide fair and professional police services to all and to partner with 
our community with a mix of community policing services and a 
problem oriented approach to address the quality of life issues that 
faced our town. To the members of the department I promised 
organizational change and a constant focus on increasing the 
professional standards of our positions. Personally, I promised that I 
would be accessible and accountable to all who needed police services 
and to be reverent for the traditions and customs that make Randolph a 
special community. 

The police department is expected to be certified by the Massachusetts 
Police Accreditation Committee before July of 2013. This process was 
a three year effort to completely review our policies and procedures 
and to ensure that the police department is following the best practices 
of our profession. Certification is the first step in the full accreditation 
process which provides detailed and specific standard procedures to 
employees of this organization which translates into improved service 
to the community. I would be remiss if I did not recognize the efforts 
of Lieutenant George McNeil who was appointed accreditation 
manager and Sgt. Melissa McCormick who have put in long hours and 
dedicated effort to see this project through. I expect full accreditation 
in 2013. 

The crime rate in Randolph dropped for the fourth straight year by 
5.5%. I am encouraged that we continue to see declines in the crime 
rate despite a difficult economy. I feel that the approach we have 
utilized in dealing with incidents that used to drive our crime rate is 
working well, this includes a dedicated patrol force and the efforts of 
our detectives in information sharing that has produced the results that 
I was hoping for. When I took charge almost three years ago, 
Randolph had three self-identified youth gangs-today there are none. 
Our youth violence strategy has been an accomplishment of this 
department that I am most proud of I am committed to this strategy 



210 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



and we must remain vigilant that youth gang activity in Randolph will 
never be tolerated. 

This year, Lieutenant Edward O'Leary retired after 32 years of service. 
Lt. O'Leary was for many years the department's training and firearms 
licensing officer and provided dedicated service to the people of 
Randolph throughout his career. We wish him a happy and healthy 
retirement. After the retirement of Lt. O'Leary, James Hayward was 
promoted to lieutenant and Penny Cirino was promoted to sergeant. 
Both officers' promotions were well deserved and I look forward to 
working with them in the future. 

Four new officers started in 2012; they were Kevin Aldred, Richard 
Brewer, Casey Conley and Billy Lok. All four officers graduated from 
the Boston Police Academy in July and completed a twelve week field 
training program. All of these officers are Randolph natives who 
already have knowledge and an understanding of this community. I 
am excited to see many of our younger residents that have an interest 
in the career of policing and the intention of serving their hometown. I 
believe that the future of the Randolph Police Department is bright 
because of the quality of the applicants we are attracting. 

Three officers received the prestigious Robert P. Dana award at 
Quincy District Court this year. They were Marc L'ltalien, Kevin 
Donnelly and Douglas Morgan. These officers arrested a man who 
had set fire to his home and threatened the lives of at least ten people. 
Their quick, brave and meritorious service was properly acknowledged 
at a ceremony at Quincy District Court last June. My sincere best 
wishes to all for their continued success in their careers. 

I would like to thank the command and supervisory staff for their 
support and wise counsel throughout the year and I am grateful to 
work with such committed professionals every day. I would like to 
thank the patrolmen and detectives of this department. Your work is 
appreciated and respected by me. No initiative can be successful 
without your support and professionalism. I thank you for your hard 
work and dedication to duty and for all the good work you do in the 
community. 



211 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

I would like to thank the Town Manager David Murphy, Town 
Council and all other departments for their assistance to the Randolph 
Police Department. In particular, I thank Chief Foley and the 
Randolph Fire Department for the excellent working relationship we 
share between our departments. I thank the Randolph Auxiliary Police 
and the Randolph Citizen's Police Alumni Association for their 
volunteerism and support to the department and the community. I 
would also like to thank our police chaplain Leland Clarke for all the 
kindnesses and support shown to the officers of the department and to 
the victims of crime. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William F. Pace 
Chief of Police 



212 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



TOWN OF RANDOLPH 
AUXILIARY POLICE DEPARTMENT 
PO BOX 322 
RANDOLPH, MASSACHUSETTS 02368 
TEL: 781-961-0999 



REPORT OF THE RANDOLPH AUXILIARY POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The Randolph Auxiliary Police Department continues to provide services to the Randolph Community 
since 1940, Protecting and Serving with Pride. The 32 Volunteer Police Officers attend a well-defined 
training program provided by the department and also attend the Municipal Police Training Council 
Academy. The result is a professional Auxiliary Police Organizations that stands ready to assist the 
Randolph Police Department and town residents. 

This report covers the period from January 1®* 2012 thru December 31^' 2012. 



Duties 


Hours 


Traffic Control 


1,886 


Patrol 


1,353 


Special Events 


1,426 


(Carnivals, Gazebo Concerts, Parades, Funerals, Town 
Meetings, etc.) 




Department Administration 


10,128 


Officer Training 


1,788 


(AED, CPR, First Responder, Firearms Qualifications, 
Recruit Training Program, Defensive Tactics, OC/Baton 
Certifications and MPTC Police Academy). 




Total Hours Served 


16,581 



Impact to the Town Of Randolph Budget. 

• The amount in the services provided by the Auxiliary Police Department and based on the 
estimated dollar value for volunteer time in 2010 for Massachusetts at a rate of $26.84 p/hr. 
was: 

$445,034.04 

We would like to extend our sincere appreciation to the Superintendent of Public Schools and the 
School Committee Members for providing us with office space and training facilities at the Devine 
School. I would also like to thank our Town Manager, Council Members, Department Heads and our 
Chief of Police William Pace and his entire staff for their continued support. 

Respectfully Subpaitt^d, 

Francis V. Robles, Sr. 
Chief of Auxiliary Police 




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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF THE PARKING CLERK 

Parking Tickets issued - 2012 1,271 

Value of Tickets issued in 2012 $74,085.00 

Value of ALL outstanding parking tickets 

owed to The Town of Randolph: 214,285.50 

Release Forms issued for RMV 148 (non-renewal status) 

TOTAL MONIES/FINES COLLECTED - 2012 $ 67.812.20 

Respectfully submitted, 

Diane M. Tracey-McNulty 
Parking Clerk 



214 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
REPORT OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Please accept the following Annual Report of your Fire Department 
for the year ending 2012: 

As in previous years, staffing changes occurred, equipment 
was put into service and maintained, and capital improvements 
continue to remain a priority. During 2012, the Department had 4,098 
ambulance responses and total Department responses exceeded 8,921. 
Ambulance services and inspection fees have been modified and will 
continue to accrue annually to the benefit of our revenue funds. 

The Department recognizes Firefighter David E. Hamelburg 
and Fire Captain Paul W. Lyons who retired this past year after 18 and 
35 years respectively of dedicated service to this Department and our 
Community. Their professionalism and dedication will be missed. 

This year has significantly benefited with the new changes in 
the governance of our community. The Department has continued to 
participate in improved interdepartmental communication which has 
resulted in a more team-like approach to business decisions and 
encourages and promotes cost efficiency in many of our municipal 
operations. This change has once again been positive, especially the 
change to oversee the day to day operations. These changes alone 
have greatly enhanced the effectiveness of departments to 
communicate and work cooperatively, providing efficient and timely 
service to the residents of the Town. We in the Department look 
forward to continuing a great working relationship with all municipal 
officials who currently serve in Town government. 

As previously reported, the time had finally come that the 
Department can no longer financially maintain the telegraph fire alarm 
system that monitors public and municipal properties and therefore 
had updated its Municipal Gamewell fire alarm reporting system to 
wireless. The original system was first put in service on August 13, 
1900. All existing municipal fire alarm street boxes were removed as 
of November 15, 2011 and the conversion of the remaining fire alarm 
master boxes to wireless fire alarm boxes or central station monitoring 
was accomplished as of October 10, 2012. This technology upgrade 



215 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



provides for significantly increased and timelier pre-incident 
information for responding and arriving Fire Department units and will 
save substantial required infrastructure costs of maintenance and 
replacement associated with the original hardwired system. 

As reported last year, an independent comprehensive Fire 
Department Study was commissioned by Town Manager David C. 
Murphy to include staffing and other safety-related issues. This 
welcome report was completed and submitted with several 
recommendations. Discussions and implementation of some of those 
recommendations began immediately following the submission of this 
report to the Town. For many, many years I have raised concerns 
regarding the safe housing for Members and apparatus assigned to 
Station 2, on-duty manpower staffing levels, and a Chief of Operations 
position. Beginning with the Fiscal Year 2013 budget, the Department 
manning level was increased to 56 Members for the first time since 
1981, a time when total responses were 3,989. (See Annual Budget 
Comparison Chart on the home page at www. randolphfire .com ) . In 
October 2012 a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) to conduct design 
services, feasibility, and planning study for a new public safety facility 
was initiated with responses due on November 28, 2012. The process 
to select the appropriate firm, form the ten respondents, is currently 
underway. From the Fire Department perspective, this new facility 
will replace Station Two, located at 920 North Main Street, become 
the new Fire Department Headquarters, and will also additionally 
house a second fuUtime staffed ambulance, as recommended. 

The Department continues to actively participate in community 
activities and always tries to provide any and all resources, support 
and/or guidance whenever needed. 

The Department continues to seek out and apply for alternate 
sources of revenue to enhance the delivery of services. Federal and 
state grants are successfully applied for as well as joining cooperative 
ventures with other communities and organizations in order to share 
costs and obtain additional resources and personnel when needed. 

I want to acknowledge and thank all of the men and women of 
this Department. They work hard and consistently train to the latest 



216 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



fire and emergency medical service standards to ensure the safety of 
the residents of the community, its properties, and resources. 

I remain grateful to the Town Council and all other Town 
Departments for their assistance to the Randolph Fire Department. 
The team concept is evident on a daily basis, which ultimately benefits 
the residents and those visitors to our proud Town. 

Finally, I wish to thank Town Manager David C. Murphy for 
his untiring efforts on behalf of this Department. His willingness to 
work, understand, and advocate for providing the necessary resources 
available for a highly effective and professional Fire Department is 
gratefully appreciated and acknowledged. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Charles D. Foley Jr. 
CHIEF OF DEPARTMENT 



217 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




Firefighters, their famiUes, town leaders, and residents paid tribute to late firefighters 
at the memorial stone and dedication of a new black granite firefighter helmet 

218 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

The Board of Health is charged with protecting the pubHc health and 
safety of the citizens of Randolph. The Infectious Disease Committee 
was formed to help with public health emergencies. Our town-wide 
MRC (Medical Reserve Corps) for Public Health Emergenc)/ 
volunteers assisted with flu clinics. The Town is still actively seeking 
volunteers in this area. We have regionalized the MRC with 
surrounding towns including Holbrook, Stoughton and Avon (SHAR). 
If interested, please contact the Holbrook EMA @ 781-630-2201. 
The following is a summary of the functions the BOH has performed 
throughout the year. 

REFUSE COLLECTION & DISPOSAL: On July 1, 2010 we entered 
into a three year contract with Allied Waste to be the Refuse Collection 
contractor for the Town of Randolph. This contract has been extended 
until June 30, 2014. SEMASS/Covanta, Rochester, MA is used for the 
disposal of the Town's refuse and curbside recycling program. The 
Town disposed of approximately 9,960.03 tons of solid waste a 12% 
decrease from last year, and 3,234.40 tons in recyclables (plastic, glass, 
cardboard) which includes tonnage from businesses, Abitibi paper 
retrieval, yard waste, electronic waste, C & D, tires, appliances. 

RECYCLESfG/CURBSIDE RECYCLESfG PROGRAMS: The Town's 
curbside recycling rate has leveled off and needs to increase. We have 
a Town goal of at least 30% which has yet to be attained. However, 
business and charitable container recycling continues to be success. 
The recyclables are picked up every other week on residents' regular 
trash days. Recycling stickers to be placed on your own recycling 
receptacles may be obtained at our office in the Town Hall. 
Newspapers, junk mail, magazines, catalogs, phonebooks, paperboard, 
cardboard (cut to 3'x3'), white and colored paper, Christmas wrapping 
and boxes should be collected together. Glass bottles and jars, plastic 
containers (all numbers, except bags), metal cans and trays may be 
recycled in a separate bin. In addition, the town was able to dispose of 
approximately 4,841.16 tons in yard waste. We continued to offer 
Abitibi Paper Retrieval containers located throughout around town 
which yielded an additional 50.42 tons of paper. Residents may call 



219 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



the ''Recycling Hotline" at 781-289-0500 with any questions or visit 
our website www.randolphboardofhealth.com . We continue to work 
diligently to improve the solid waste program and pursue and procure 
any available grant monies for recycling. We will re-institute a Town 
Recycling Committee for the year 2013 chaired by the Recycling 
Coordinator. This will assist the Town's efforts to reach Randolph's 
diverse population and ultimate recycling goals. 

The yard waste and CRT programs co-exist, and collection of these 
items can now be brought to the DPW yard, which is located directly 
behind the Joseph Zapustas Ice Skating Rink. The DPW yard opens 
every other Saturday, 8:00 A.M. to 12 Noon from April through 
November of each calendar year. Liformation can be obtained from 
the Board of Health office regarding dates and times the yearly 
recycling calendars are sent to each resident. This program has 
ensured that CRTs are properly and safely disposed of by strictly 
following the State guidelines. 

This year, we conducted our sixteenth Annual Household Hazardous 
Waste Day. The event, also involving the Town of Avon, continues to 
be a success, with approximately 3 1 6 cars attending and disposing of 
large amounts of oil, paint, tires, batteries and adhesives. We 
continue to offer the medication take back program which is very 
successful in keeping these hazardous materials out of the waste 
stream and homes. 

FORECLOSED ABANDONED PROPERTY: 

The Town with the assistance of the new Code Enforcement Officers 
, The existing Code Management Task Force and The Attorney 
General's receivership program continue to improve the Towns 
neighborhood quality of life issues. The proactive methods the Town 
now has at its disposal will hold delinquent properties accountable and 
allow for a quick resolution to outstanding violations. 

PUBLIC HEALTH COMPLAINTS: Numerous complaints were 
received for various health nuisances and hazards which were 
investigated and resolved during the year. These are recorded and 
placed on file. 



220 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



PUBLIC, SEMI-PUBLIC POOL INSPECTIONS: The State mandates 
that pubHc/semi-pubhc pools be inspected and brought up to code 
prior to issuance of annual license. This duty falls to the local Board 
of Health and, as such, over 20 inspections and re- inspections of 
public and semi-public pools were made by this office prior to issuing 
annual permits. We issued 16 permits, for public, semi-public and 
private pools. 

INSPECTION OF NURSING AND OTHER STATE-RUN HOMES: 
2 inspections of 1 facility were made prior to re-licensing. 

FOOD/LTD. FOOD SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS: 85 permits 
were issued to restaurants and other type of operations serving food 
and/or drink for consumption on the premises. Some Inspections of all 
establishments have been carried out in excess of the two required by 
State Code and will continue to be monitored constantly. 

FROZEN DESSERT ESTABLISHMENTS: 4 permits were issued. 
Inspections occur on a regular basis. 

MOBILE FOOD & TEMPORARY FOOD SERVICE 
ESTABLISHMENTS : 3 permits were issued and are inspected on a 
regular basis. 

RETAIL & LIMITED RETAIL FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS: 60 
permits were issued to retail & limited retail food establishments. All 
are being inspected on a regular basis. 

CATERING ESTABLISHMENTS: 7 permits were issued to operate a 
catering establishment, which are inspected at regular intervals. 

WHOLES ALE/MANUFACTUREMG FACILITIES : 2 permits were 
issued to Wholesale/Manufacturing facilities, which are inspected on a 
yearly basis. 

HEALTH CLUB: 2 Permits were issued to Health Clubs with an 
annual inspection conducted. 



221 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

COLLECTION & DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE/GREASE: 7 permit(s) 
were issued. 

REMOVAL, TRANSPORT. DISPOSE OF GARBAGE/OFFAL: 19 
permits were issued. 

TOBACCO PERMITS: 43 permits were issued for the sale of tobacco 
products. 

SUNTANNING FACILITIES: 3 permits were issued and facilities 
inspected. 

VAPOR BATHS: 1 license was issued. 

WIC NUTRITION PROGRAM: In order to facilitate the growing 
needs of our residents by increasing their appointments and hours, the 
WIC staff is located in the Corkin Building, 19 North Main Street and 
continues to offer Randolph residents its services and nutrition 
programs for women, infants and children. This program has served 
over 1000 children in 2012. 

REVENUE PRODUCED 
Permits, Licenses & Fines (Including appliances; CRT's, 



Stickers & tonnage reimbursement) $5 1 ,870.71 

Corkin Bldg. Rental 2,400.00 

Immunization Revolving 9.766.25 

Abandoned Property Fees 61,000.00 

Grants 95,500.00** 

TOTAL $220,536.96 



We appHed for and received six grants in 2012: a Community 
Health Network Alliance (CHNA 20) grant for in the amount 
of $3,500; a Massachusetts Association of Health Boards 
(MHO A) grant for $425.00 and a SMRP; a Mass Sustainable 
Recovery Program (SMRP) Grant for $1,500.00, plus 80 hrs 



222 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



in-kind technical assistance; a Homecorp Community 
Restoration grant in the amount of $80,000.00 from the 
Attorney General's Office; a Massachusetts Emergency 
Management Agency (MEMA) grant of $10,000.00 and a 
Department of Public Health local public health immunization 
grant of $500.00. 

We wish to thank our office staff, Priscilla MacDougall and Paula 
Steward for all their assistance in the day-to-day operation of the office 
and for their service and ability. Our Public Health Nurse, Cheryl 
Cates, MSN, RN continues to work well with her patients and the 
community and has established many relationships and programs to 
assist the Randolph citizenry. 

On September 10, 2012 we were fortunate to acquire and welcome 
Code Enforcement Officers Richard Crowley and Cheryl Witherspoon 
to the staff, with whom we share with the Building Department. On 
October 9^^, 2012 at a regularly scheduled Board of Health meeting, 
they were also deputized as Health Agents for the Town of Randolph. 
Both are a welcome asset and work well with both the Board of Health 
and Building Department. 

Lastly, we wish to thank David Murphy, Town Manager, who oversees 
the day-to-day operation of the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mark Kittredge, Chairman 
Thomas J. Fisher, Vice Chairman 
Dr. David Kaplan, CHO RS Member 
Esther Muhammad, RN, Member 
Nelly Janga, Member 

John P. McVeigh, MBA, CHO, R.S., Commissioner of Public 
Health/A 



223 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 
GENERAL INFORMATION 

The Public Health Nursing section of the Board of Health (BOH) 
continues to be a busy one. This year the Public Health Nurse was 
involved in several new initiatives. She was designated as the 
Randolph representative to the Regional Opioid Overdose Reduction 
Coalition addressing opioid overdoses in Quincy, Braintree, 
Weymouth and Randolph. The BOH co-sponsored the annual 
Community Health Fair with the Senior Services in September. Over 
300 individuals attended the event held at the James Hurley Senior and 
Veterans Center. The newly formed Randolph Health Literacy 
Alliance sponsored by the BOH is comprised of community residents 
and agencies serving Randolph's diverse population provided health 
education materials in multiple languages at the fair. The Health 
Alliance and the BOH conducted four community focus groups, one in 
Vietnamese, Haitian Creole and two in Spanish, to determine how 
residents would like to get their health information. This initiative was 
funded through a grant from the Blue Hills Community Health 
Alliance (CHNA 20). A community education session on staying 
healthy was provided to 32 individuals of the Asian Caregiver's group. 
The BOH Public Health Nurse also participated in the Family Fitness 
Day, the Randolph High School Career Day, the Lions Club Mobile 
Health Van at the Devine School, and provided a flu clinic at the Stars 
Early Head Start Open House using vaccines purchased through a 
$500.00 local health grant from the Massachusetts Department of 
Public Health. The BOH Public Health Nurse continues to work with 
local universities and colleges for nursing and public health intern 
preceptorships. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

All reportable communicable diseases are investigated by the Public 
Health Nurse. Confidential reports are completed and kept at the 
Randolph Board of Health as well as submitted to the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health. Infectious disease surveillance is done 
electronically. The following communicable diseases were reported in 
Randolph in 2012. There were a total of 112 reported cases with 52 
ultimately confirmed. 



224 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 





Reported 


Confirmed 


Calicivirus/Norovirus 


1 


1 


Campylobacteriosis 


1 


1 


Cryptosporidiosis 


1 
1 


1 


Dengue Fever 


3 


U 


Giardiasis 


z 


z 


Group A Streptococcus 


4 


A 
U 


Haemophilus influenzae 


1 


A 
U 


Hepatitis A 


2 





Hepatitis B 




A 

4 


Hepatitis C 


15 


1 1 


Influenza 


13 


1 '> 
13 


Lyme 


16 


3 


Malaria 


1 


1 


Meningicoccal Disease 


1 


1 


Pertussis 






(& other Bordetella species) 5 


5 




KUDeiia 


1 
1 


u 


Salmonella 


/ 


/ 


Shigellosis 


1 


1 


Streptococcus pneumoniae 


5 


3 


Toxoplasmosis 


1 





Varicella 


1 






PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING AND CLINICAL PROGRAMS 

IMMUNIZATIONS AND BIOLOGICAL WASTE PROGRAM 

Selected vaccines are provided free of charge to the Randolph BOH 
from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH). In 
November 2011, the BOH implemented a $15 administration fee to 
cover increased costs of disposal of sharps. An application to wave the 
increase is available in the BOH office for eligible residents. The use 
of this program decreased from 75 individuals to 60 from the previous 
year. As of July 2010, Massachusetts State Law prohibited individuals 
from disposing of their syringes in the trash. 



225 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
INFLUENZA IMMUNIZATION 

In 2012, the BOH was fortunate to begin administering flu vaccine in 
September for the 2012-2013 season. The Massachusetts Department 
of Public Health supplied flu vaccine for children up to 18 years of age 
and for adults who were uninsured or underinsured. Vaccine was 
purchased by the town to vaccinate those with insurance; those who 
were homebound or unable to come to clinics. Additionally, we 
worked with the Randolph Public Schools to immunize students. Flu 
vaccine was given to students during school hours at all schools in 
Randolph using only the nasal spray flu vaccine. Over 150 doses were 
given at school clinics. Three public clinics were held at the Senior 
Center, Town Hall (2) and ongoing appointments in the Public Health 
Nurse's office. Clinics were also held for Randolph public safety 
employees, the Hospice in Randolph, as well as Stars Early Head Start 
Program and New Life Counseling Agency. The BOH was fortunate 
to have assistance from the Randolph Women's Club and the SHAR 
Medical Reserve Corps supporting immunization clinics. 

KEEP-WELL CLINICS 

Keep-Well Clinics are blood pressure screenings for Randolph 
residents who are typically 65 and older. There were 35 blood 
pressure clinics held in Randolph last year. There were 390 people 
who had a blood pressure screening at a clinic or in the office. 

TUBERCULOSIS TESTING/CASES 

Individuals of various ages had TB testing at the BOH in 201 1. The 
test must be evaluated 48-72 hours after being done. There were no 
new cases of suspect or confirmed active tuberculosis in 2012. 
However, there were 118 cases of TB infection (not contagious). Out 
of 168 tuberculin skin tests administered, 26 were positive in 2012. 

OFFICE AND HOME VISITS 

Randolph residents come to the BOH for a variety of reasons including 
allergy injections. Vitamin B12 injections, injectable medication 
administration, blood pressure monitoring, or TB skin testing. This 
year 359 people obtained services from the Randolph BOH. This 
number also includes individuals requiring immunizations. There were 
47 home visits made this past year, for people who do not qualify for 



226 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Visiting Nurse services but are homebound or have had active 
tuberculosis. 

OTHER PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES 

MEDICARE AND SENIOR HMO REIMBURSEMENT 

Last year the BOH received $1,810.13 in Medicare reimbursement for 
the 2011-2012 flu season. Additionally, we received $2,294.33 from 
insurers for Senior HMO's and individuals under 65 for a total 
reimbursement for flu and pneumonia vaccines of $4,104.66. These 
funds assist the BOH provide the immunization program throughout 
the year. These decreased numbers reflect a reduced number of 
reimbursable vaccines given in 201 1-2012 flu season by the BOH. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT COLLABORATION 

The collaboration with the Fire Department continued this year and 
included 5 1 participants in the annual bladder cancer and tuberculosis 
screenings. Fifty-one had bladder screens and 33 had TB skin tests. 
Influenza vaccine clinics were offered at the Fire Department for all 
fire fighters. The BOH and the Fire Department continue to 
collaborate regarding emergency preparedness, in particular vulnerable 
residents who will need additional help. 

COLLABORATION WITH MANET COMMUNITY 
HEALTH CENTER 

Manet Community Health Center provided staff to the BOH once a 
month to assist families with enrollment into health insurance. Forty- 
four individuals were assisted in 2012. Additionally, the BOH Public 
Health Nurse assisted with the collaboration of Manet Community 
Health Center and the Randolph Public Schools. 

MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS COLLABORATION - 
SHAR MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS 

The SHAR Medical Reserve Corps provided many hours of service in 
2012 to support the nursing services of Randolph. Deployments 
included flu clinics, administering TB skin tests in a large scale setting, 
as well as planning for emergency preparedness exercises and drills 
were tremendous assets to the community. MRC leadership also was 



227 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

involved in other program development of community initiatives. 
Many thanks go to the volunteers who supported the BOH in 2012. 
Over 268 volunteer hours were provided in 2012. 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS INITIATIVE 

The BOH Public Health Nurse led the community in preparing for 
public health emergencies. Plans for reaching the entire community 
with emergency public health messages were reviewed in meetings 
throughout the year, hi December, the Massachusetts Emergency 
Management Agency (MEMA) awarded Randolph a $10,000 grant to 
address current planning efforts, including review of plans and 
provision of training of responding agencies during large scale 
emergencies. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Cheryl Cates, MSN, RN 



228 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Randolph 

2012 Report of the Norfolk County Mosqutto Control District 



Our operations apply an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) approach to mosquito control that is rational, 
environmentally sensitive, and cost effective. 

Surveillance 

We are engaged in an intensive monitoring process through weekly field collections and data analysis in 
collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) to detect for disease- 
vectoring mosquitoes. Virus isolations assist us in focusing our surveillance to hot zones thereby allowing 
us to alert nearby towns of a potential epidemic. 

Virus Isolations in the town: no isolates in town in 20 1 2 

Water Management 

Communication with residents and town/state/federal officials, site visits, monitoring, wildlife 
management, and land surveys while maintaining regulatory compliance is integral to the management of 
waterways that may contribute to mosquito breeding. Pre- to post-management documentation allows us 
to assess the efficacy of our work. 



Culverts cleared 17 culverts 

Drainage ditches checked/hand cleaned 8,200 feet 

Intensive hand clean^rushing* 1,650 

Mechanical water management 



* Combination of brush cutting and clearing of severely degraded drainage systems or streams by hand. 

Larval Control 

When mosquito larval habitat management is not possible, larval mosquito abatement is the most 
environmentally friendly and effective method of disease control An intensive monitoring program, aides 
in our decision to effectively target culprit locations. 



Spring aerial larvicide applications (April) acres 

Summer aerial larvicide applications (May - August) acres 

Larval control - briquette & granular applications by hand 1 .7 acres 

Rain basin treatments - briquettes by hand (West Nile virus control) 2,1 56 basms 

Abandoned/unopened pool or other manmade structures treated briquets 



Adult Control 

Adult mosquito control is necessary when public health and/or quality of life is threatened either by 
disease agents, overwhehning populations, or both. Our rigorous surveillance program, along with service 
request data and state of the art GPS and computer equipment, allows us to focus our treatments to 
targeted areas. 

Adult aerosol ultra low volume (ULV) applications from trucks 5,563 acres 



Respectfully submitted. 



David A. Lawson, Director 



229 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
REPORT OF THE LOCAL EDUCATION FUND COMMITTEE 

The Local Education Fund was established twenty years ago to aid in 
funding the enrichment programs for the school children of Randolph. 
The Fund is administered by a group of citizens appointed by the 
Town Manager. Money for the fund is donated by the citizens of the 
town when they pay their excise and property taxes. 

This past November, the committee met and allotted money to help 
fund the following programs: Symphony in the Schools, Bam Babies, 
Dual Language Library, English Language Arts Manipulatives, 
Student Headphones/Ear Buds, Seeing Ourselves in Literature, Spring 
Musical Production of "Into the Woods", Library Literacy: Becoming 
& Connecting to Authors, tickets for a field trip to Battleship Cove, 
Comprehension Leveled Library to Early Readers, Low Readability, 
High Interest Literature, Multi-Cultural Choral Concert, and tickets to 
go to Theatreworks USA. 

Each of the schools in the town received some money from the fund 
for these programs. The committee hopes that the citizens will donate 
to this fund when they pay their taxes. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Sheila Campbell, Chair 
Ellen Griffm 
Alfred Galante 
Ann Wickles 
Catherine Grinnell 
Madeline Brennan 
Judy Brennan 
Yeu Kue 



230 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The Department of Public Works respectfully submits its report for the 
year 2012. 

Engineering Division 

The Engineering Division had another busy and productive year in 
2012 with a staff of one. The duties were widespread. Lot grading 
plans were reviewed and approved in conjunction with construction 
projects, as well as the required inspections during construction and 
through occupancy were performed. The department provided abutters 
lists for various board hearings and meetings. Field inspections were 
conducted on an on-going basis for any subdivisions that were on- 
going at various stages. Public Works projects that were worked on 
were varied and included assisting contractors on drainage, water, and 
roadway improvements. Street line surveys were performed for trees, 
and utility poles. 

Substantial time was spent with Engineers, Surveyors, Real Estate 
Brokers, Appraisers, Lawyers, and Contractors for plan, map, flood 
plain research, inspections of construction, and final completion of 
projects. Assistance is always given to consulting engineers that are 
working for the Town on a wide variety of projects. Assistance was 
given to the Town of Randolph Police Department on many cases with 
plan, map, and aerial photography copies as well as on-call expert 
witness representation. 

The department provided all Town departments with map, plan, deed, 
street, and utility research and analysis, as well as the annual update of 
the Town Assessor's Maps and other town maps were performed as 
required. 

Highway Division 

This division is staffed with 1 1 full time employees. The duties of the 
Highway division include street sweeping, catch basin cleaning, 
pothole repair, pavement maintenance, traffic signal and sign 
maintenance, lining and striping, grounds maintenance of Town 



231 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



buildings and park areas (not including school property), roadside 
cleaning, snow and ice operations, and the maintenance of all DPW 
equipment. 

Work continued in conjunction with the development of the Pavement 
Management System. This will consist of a street by street road 
condition inspection. The results of this inspection will be used to 
generate a complete roadway condition inventory for the entire Town. 
This inventory will then be used to prepare a road improvement capitol 
plan by which road improvements will be scheduled. Road 
improvements will be based on available Town funds and Chapter 90 
State Aid funds. The development of the pavement management report 
will serve as the tool for long range road improvement planning. All of 
our roadway improvement projects are coordinated with other utility 
improvements so that all improvements are made prior to roadway 
improvements. 

The 2012 road construction season saw the following roadway 
improvement projects completed: : Stoughton Street, Highland Glen 
Drive, Park Street, Memorial Parkway, North Street (from Union 
Street to Mill Street), and Scanlon Drive. Roadway improvement 
projects started in 2012 that will be completed in 2013 include Liberty 
Street and Reed Street (from High Street to Canton Street). Small 
paving repair projects were also completed along with a continuation 
of the crack sealing program. Crack sealing is an important process in 
maintaining roads so they do not deteriorate after other improvements 
have been completed on them. During the winter of 2013 streets will 
continued to be evaluated and a list of proposed roadwork will be 
presented to the Town Manager. Roadways that are scheduled for 
improvement in 2013 that will be presented to the Town Manager 
include: Sarah Street, Upham Street, Maple Street, Selwyn Road (from 
Stoughton Street to L'Heureux Circle), and Reynolds Ave. Additional 
roadway assessments will be made at the end of the 2012-2013 winter 
season to prioritize roadways that deteriorated substantially during the 
winter process. 

This division also worked closely with Town Manager David Murphy 
in all of the ongoing efforts to beautify the Town. Plans are underway 
for a continuation of that program in 2013. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Roadside littering and dumping continues to be a thorn in the side of 
this division and the Town as a whole. We ask all citizens and 
businesses to work with the Town to try to eliminate this problem and 
to help keep Randolph clean 

Sewer Division 

This division is staffed with 3 full time employees. The duties of this 
division include the daily maintenance of nearly 100 miles of sewer 
mains ranging in size from 6" - 36" and 9 pumping stations. 

Plans and specifications were finalized and sealed bids were received 
for pump station upgrades to the following stations, Summit Road, 
Fawn Circle, and the Donovan School. These pump stations were 
originally built in the late 70 's and early 80 's. Improvements to these 
sewer pump stations along with some sewer line replacements were 
completed during the 2012 construction season. The Vine Street sewer 
pump station is the next scheduled station for upgrade and plans will 
be developed in 2013 for that work along with an Infiltration and 
Inflow removal project. 

Removal of grease and disposable cleaning products from the sewer 
system continues to be a daily struggle for this division. All residents 
are urged to dispose of grease and cleaning products properly and not 
in the sewer system. The buildup of grease in sewer lines will 
eventually clog the line to the point where the lines will no longer flow 
and a backup will occur. When a backup occurs many times a sewer 
manhole will overflow in the street or in most cases the backup will 
find its way into a home or a business. Either way a costly cleanup 
ensues along with potential health risks. 

Water Division 

This division is staffed with 5 full time employees. The dufies of this 
division include the daily maintenance of nearly 100 miles of water 
mains ranging in size from 2" to 24", 1100 fire hydrants, and over 
9000 services and meters. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



In 2009 the DPW applied for and received another grant from the 
Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) totaling $6 million 
dollars for the continuation of our water system rehabilitation 
program. The following water main improvements were included in 
this grant request and completed in 2012: Cleaning and lining of the 
14" main on North Main Street from Canton Street to Union Street, 
cleaning and lining of the 14" main on Pond Street from Grove Ave. to 
the pumping station. Replacement of the existing 6" cast iron main 
with a new 8" ductile iron mains on the following streets; Vine Street, 
Tangen Street, Nelson Drive, Norroway Ave., Waldo Street, Hall 
Street, Diauto Drive, Maple Street, Maple Circle, and South Street. All 
of the water main improvements that are done increase water quality 
along with providing increased flows and pressure for fire protection. 
There still remains approximately 60,000 feet of 6" water mains that 
need cleaning and lining. Cost estimates are being developed in order 
to seek out any grant opportunities and possible funding sources for 
this work. We have applied for another grant from DEP to clean and 
line the 12" water mains on Union Street and South Main Street. Both 
of these mains were installed in the late 1800's and are in need of 
cleaning and lining and new gate and hydrant installations. 

The concept of a regional water treatment plant continued to progress 
slowly in 2012. The Towns of Braintree, Holbrook and Randolph are 
working to complete the design, gain financing, and construct this new 
plant. Funding concerns raised by the Town of Holbrook have slowed 
the process and may impact the construction of a new regional plant. 
The three Towns are working together to address the funding concerns 
of Holbrook and continue to make this new plant a reality. The 
regional plant is the most economically feasible way to replace the 
aging water treatment plants in both Randolph/Holbrook, and 
Braintree. 

The DPW remains committed to providing the highest level of service 
attainable with the dollars and manpower available to maintain our 
most valuable infrastructure for the people of Randolph. 

If you have any questions or comments relative to any DPW program 
you may contact DPW Supt. David Zecchini at 781-961-0940. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



I would like to thank all of the other Town departments, Boards and 
Committees for their continued assistance and support. A special thank 
you is directed to the dedicated DPW employees for their continued 
hard work and efforts. 

Respectfully submitted: 

David A. Zecchini, Supt. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF INSPECTIONAL SERVICES 

I hereby submit my amiual report for the Inspectional Services 
Department for the calendar year ending December 31, 2012. 

The total sum collected for permits and inspections for Inspectional 
Services is $344,680.90. All monies were turned over to the 
Treasurer's Office. All monies w^ere turned over to the Treasurer's 
Office. 



Permits issued are as follow^s: 
Residential one/two family dwellings: 

Single family dwellings: 24 

Additions to dwellings: 16 

Renovations to dwellings: 75 

Coal/wood stoves, pellets, inserts: 4 

Demolitions to dwellings: 11 

Demolitions to accessory structures: 1 

Fire repairs: 8 

Garages/bams: 3 

Municipal permits: 3 

Porch: 2 

Re-roof 118 

Residing of dwellings: 28 

Replacement Windows: 57 

Solar Modules: 28 

Storage sheds: 3 

Sundecks: 28 

Swimming Pools: 9 

Temporary trailer: 1 

Temporary tent: 1 

Weatherization: 53 

Miscellaneous: 17 

Multifamily: 

Renovations: 5 

Re-roof 5 

Weatherization: 4 

Miscellaneous: 2 

Sub-total 506 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Business/Industrial 

Renovations: 21 

Re-roof: 7 

Carnival: 1 

Temporary tent: 2 

Miscellaneous: 8 

Sub total: 39 

Other Inspections 

Complaints: 108 

Certificates of occupancy: 29 

Sign permits granted: 26 

Periodic inspections certificates: 117 

Building permits denied: 3 

Building inspections: 414 

Sub-total: 697 

Plumbing and Gas 

Permits: 530 

Wiring 

Permits: 594 

Grand Total 2,366 



In closing, I thank the Town Manager for the opportunity to 
serve the Town of Randolph as Building Commissioner, and I extend 
thanks to the Town Council, Fire, Police, Planning, Code 
Enforcement, Board of Health and all boards and commissions for 
their ongoing support and assistance. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

George A. Fabrizio, C.B.O. 
Building Commissioner 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER/ANIMAL 

INSPECTOR 

Established under Massachusetts General Law Chapter 140, Sections 
136 - 174, the Animal Control Office responds to calls relating to wild 
and domestic animals that may be sick, injured or considered 
dangerous. This office has one employee who enforces all Federal, 
State, County and Town laws regarding animal cruelty as well as lost 
or abandoned animals. 

Over the past year, on average there were 6-8 calls and complaints per 
day which came to the attention of the Animal Control Officer. 
Among these calls there were: 

■ Dog bites to humans and other animals. 

■ Loose and stray dogs. 

■ Dogs and cats that were quarantined. 

■ All animals that were tested for rabies were negative. 

■ Bam inspections. 

■ Above average number of dead animals were removed from 
streets and neighborhoods. 

■ 1,511 dogs were licensed. 

The annual Rabies Clinic inoculated 172 dogs, cats and ferrets. 
Revenues were donated to the Dick Bustard Memorial Fund for the 
care of stray and injured animals. 

Finally, I would like to thank the Police, Fire, Code Enforcement 
Department, Board of Health, School Departments, the Town 
Manager's Office, the Animal Hospital, the Animal Rescue League 
and the MSPCA. I would also like to thank all those conscientious 
citizens who licensed their dogs. And, I would like to give special 
thanks to Kristen MacDonald and Cheryl Sass from the Town Clerk's 
Office as well as Lt. Charles Thistle who is the liaison between the 
RPD and Animal Control Office. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Stephen R. Slavinsky, 

Animal Control Officer/ Animal Inspector 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE TURNER FREE 

LIBRARY 

There were so many exciting changes at the Turner Free Library in 
2012 it is hard to know where to begin. 

In January, the Children's Room completed a big construction project. 
Offices were added for the Assistant Director/Children's Librarian and 
for the Technical Services staff. The Children's service desk was 
expanded significantly to include a third terminal, which has helped 
cut down significantly on waiting time for patrons of this Department. 

Every February, the library staff works together to weed the 
collections and make room for new materials. This year we focused 
on removing outdated college, testing, ESL, citizenship, and 
employment resources. The books were discarded and then new 
materials we ordered to update the collections. We opened the 
College and Testing Center in the Teen Room, which offers college 
guides, testing study books, CDS, and Internet resources, and publicity 
about open houses and college applications. The Center has been very 
successful and has been supported by many programs at the library 
including: how to apply for college, how to improve your SAT score, 
and how to write a college essay. 

Also in February, the Randolph High School Swim Team did their 
annual day long read-a-thon fundraiser. This year they chose to donate 
all the money they raised to the library to purchase Nook e-readers for 
the Children's Room. They were able to purchase 4 Nooks, and they 
are available for children to borrow. 

The Trustees generously continued to fund our exterior improvements 
by purchasing 3 outside signs for the library. Hand carved by local 
business Yankee Woodcarvers; the signs have been a wonderful 
addition to our ever improving streetscape. Some of the Trustees 
rolled up their sleeves and finished off the landscaping of the front and 
side yards, much to the delight of passerby. 

March also saw the release of the film version of The Hunger Games. 
There was a phenomenal program to support the trilogy and allow the 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



teens to win prizes, including complete sets of the books, passes to the 
movie, t-shirts, and posters. Over 50 teens attended and enjoyed our 
archery competition, and the "banquet" of local foods from Panem. 
The teens also made origami Mockingjays and harvested "aid 
balloons" full of things to help them survive the competition. 

The library was long overdue for an update to its Long Range Plan, 
which expired in 2010. All public libraries must have a LRP in place 
in order to receive grant money from the state. The Director and 2 
Trustees formed a committee and began the arduous process of 
designing the plan. A user survey was distributed to town residents, 
and we garnered over 1 100 responses. The plan was approved by the 
Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners in December and is 
effect through 2016. We have immediately moved to take advantage 
of our eligibility for grants by applying for the Community Innovation 
Challenge Grant, the MBLC's Library Services and Technology Grant, 
and hope to apply for the MBLC's Library Construction Grant. 

In April the Trustees sponsored an unprecedented number of staff to 
attend the Massachusetts Library Association's Annual Conference. 
Several days of continuing education, author talks, technology 
training, and legal information was acquired and has been applied in 
action back in Randolph. 

The spring also brought quite a few collection development initiatives. 
The library subscribed to Freading, an e-book service meant to 
complement our existing contract with Overdrive. You can reserve, 
check out, and return e-books from the comfort of your own home. 
The best part about Freading is that there are unlimited copies of each 
title available, so there is never a wait for any title. 
The microfilm reader at the library was broken, and so obsolete that it 
was impossible to repair. However, we still had 40 years' worth of 
Randolph Herald and Randolph Mariners on microfilm. What to do? 
Digitize it! We sent the microfilm off to a company and they uploaded 
a complete database going back to 1967. You can find it free at 
www.tumerfreelibrary.org 

The final collection development innovation was to begin to lease 
books. Top selling titles often have hold lists of hundreds of patrons. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Through the lease program, we can temporarily acquire as many as 10 
copies of popular titles so the wait list won't be very long. These titles 
are only available to Randolph patrons and do not lend to surrounding 
towns. 

In June, we added more efficient print and time management systems 
to our public Internet computers, enabling patrons to make a 
reservation and to choose when their print jobs are released rather than 
having automatic releases. 

Summer Reading was more successful than ever before with over 
1,000 children reading over ONE MILLION minutes. 

Perhaps the biggest accomplishment of the year was the September 
addition of Meaghan Thompson, Young Adult and Technology 
Services Librarian. She is a full time librarian, with a fresh MLS from 
Simmons College. She had been a part time teen librarian at Cohasset. 
We are thrilled to have her aboard. She is making a huge difference in 
the quantity and quality of programming in the Teen Room and for 
adults too. 

The Friends of the Library were very active and very generous (as 
always) this year. The ongoing book sale and cafe continue to be 
successes, and the semi-annual Big Book Sale gets more profitable, 
and more fun, every year! ! 

The Library was overjoyed at the evolution of the Holiday Stroll into 
Winterfest and enjoyed partnering with the Town and the Chamber of 
Commerce to provide the best party yet! The library had well over 
1000 visitors on Dec 1st, 

We would like to remind everyone that the library is available to you 
24 hours a day through the following resources: 
wvvw.tumerfreelibrary.org 

Facebook: Turner Free Library & Friends of the Turner Free Library 
Twitter: TumerFreeLib 
Pinterest: TumerLib 

I would like to thank the staff of the library, the library volunteers, the 
people of Randolph, the Town Manager, Town Council, Library 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Trustees, Friends of the Library and everyone at Town Hall who 
helped make last year such a success. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Sara Slymon, Director 




Turner Free Library decked out for the town's first Annual Winterfest! celebration 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
TURNER FREE LIBRARY 

Turner Free Library had another busy year in both materials 
borrowed, programs offered and ongoing building maintenance. I 
direct you to the "Report of the Director of Turner Free Library" for 
more specific details. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
many supporters of the Turner Library as well as the staff who 
continue to provide library patrons with exemplary service. 

A special thank you to the Crawford Family for their generosity, 
philanthropy and continued support of the library. 

As the Chairperson of the Board of Trustees, I take this 
opportunity to publicly thank the library staff, for their dedication and 
professionalism; the volunteers for the gift of their time and 
dedication; the Friends of the Turner Library for their continued 
support and the numerous activities and events that they sponsor to 
enrich our community and our lives; and the members of the Board of 
Trustees of the library for their commitment to the ideals and goals of 
the Turner Free Library, their support and council. I also want to 
extend a special thank you to Don Spargo and Henry Rota who retired 
this year from the Board of Trustees. For their many years of service 
as members of the Board and especially their tireless efforts as 
members of the Building Committee. Thank you for a job well done. 

Respectfully submitted 

Scott F. Cartwright 
President Board of Trustees 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE ELDER AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT 

This year as always, we applied for grants to fund our much needed 
services. We received $47,838.00 in aid. The money was used to 
provide an Outreach Worker, Bi-lingual Friendly Visitor Services, Bi- 
lingual Caregiver Support Services, and Medical Transportation 
including Boston and support staff for the office. 

We've had many entertaining functions. We celebrated Chinese New 
Year, had a Thanksgiving dinner at the Am Vets Post and also at 
Lombardo's. We held a Community Health Fair in September and 
ended the year with a Holiday Concert performed by students and their 
instructor from the Bosse School of Music. All this was done at little 
or no cost to our seniors. 

Again. we held our "Thursday Evening Program" and added E.S.L. for 
our Asian residents. We have also added movies once a month, Gentle 
Yoga classes, and Canasta, among others. We've added Friday food 
shopping to local supermarkets and to Boston for the Asian 
Community. There were relevant day programs and/or presentations 
on topics such as Emergency Preparedness, Personal Preparedness, A 
Caregivers' Journey, Healthy Living, Ask the Lawyer, and Blue 
Cross/Blue Shield. We distributed Farmer's Market coupons and the 
Senior Center was used as a Flu Clinic site. 

We would like to thank Dunkin Donuts, Lombardo's and Am Vets 
Post #5 1 for their continued support. We would also like to thank Dot 
Sullivan, President of the CO. A and Board Members, the Brenda 
Margolis President/Treasurer of the Friends of Randolph Seniors and 
our many, truly dedicated volunteers. To our office staff; Joanne 
Coffman, Mary McLellan, and Gail Hymovitz; Outreach Worker, 
Brenda Margolis; and Caregiver Support Manager, Helen Lam; and 
van drivers; Peter Bickford and Dan McEleney. Thank you to Elsie 
Morrill and Rena Baker for all their years of service to the Town of 
Randolph and the seniors of our community. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Marc Craig 

Director of Community Programming 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




Chinese New Year was celebrated at the Hurley Senior & Veterans Center 

in February 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF THE VETERANS SERVICES DEPARTMENT 

The sluggish economy has resulted in a near doubling of the client 
base of needy veterans assisted by this office the past two years and 
Chapter 115 Massachusetts Veterans' Benefits recipients account for 
the significant majority of monetary expenditures. This department has 
also invested a significant amount of time assisting a number of 
Randolph veterans and dependents with federal VA claims and issues. 
This past year in particular saw a significant spike in the amount of 
federal Aid & Attendance claims prepared and filed. Electronic 
upgrades are constantly improving the way benefits and services are 
accessed by and provided to needy veterans by this office and in 
addition to these improvements the hours of operation of the 
department were changed this past year to provide more efficient 
accessibility to needed services for Randolph veterans. 

In June a memorial was dedicated to George Lovering, Randolph's 
lone Medal of Honor recipient. A very emotional and inspiring Iraq & 
Afghanistan Memorial Wall was displayed at the James Hurley Senior 
& Veterans' Center in September and a memorial stone was unveiled 
at the Donovan School in honor of Pearl Harbor survivor, the late 
Ernie Wilkins. 

It is an honor to serve the veterans of Randolph in this capacity and I 
would like to thank the Town Council as well as Town Manager David 
Murphy for their continued support and for their willingness to listen 
to new ideas that enhance access to as well as the administration of 
services for Randolph veterans. 

Respectfully submitted 

Michael Cunningham, Director 
Randolph Veterans' Services 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




On June 1 6* , members of the Hurley family gathered at the dedication and unveiling 
of the newly named James M. Hurley Senior and Veterans Center 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 





George Mason Lovering Square was re-dedicated at a ceremony with town officials 
and veterans. The meditationbench and the memorial Stone were unveiled. The other 
side of the stone is engraved with the following citation: 

During a momentary conftision in the ranks caused by other troops rushing upon the 
regiment, this soldier, with coolness and determination, rendered efficient aid in 
prevenfing a panic among the troops. Dedicated on June 9, 2012" 

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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
REPORT OF THE SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

The ultimate goal of the Sealer of Weights and Measures is to "Create 
Equity in the Marketplace." The marketplace in Randolph included 
inspections at 53 business locations using weighing and measuring 
devices, and this generated $7,904 in sealing and inspection fees 
delivered to the town[?]s general fund. 

There were 98 scales, 17 weights, 17 reverse redemption machines, 4 
scanner systems, 210 gasoline and diesel meters, 4 spring-water meters 
and 1 vehicle tank meter inspected, tested, and sealed for the year 
2012. By making adjustments to the devices found to be out of 
tolerance, and using the standard reporting form developed by the 
State Division of Standards to calculate the consumer and merchant 
savings impact report, the consumers of Randolph were saved 
$2779.00 over the year 2012. 

Also, as Sealer, four training seminars conducted by the Eastern Mass 
and Massachusetts Weights and Measures Associations held at various 
locations throughout the State were attended during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Donald W. Smith 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE RANDOLPH HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

2012 Was a busy year for your Historical Commission, with several 
accomplishments : 

^ Survey & Planning Grant - In December 2011, the Historical 
Commission was invited to submit a full application for a 
survey and planning grant for the development of a town-wide 
historic preservation plan as part of the Town's Master Plan to 
guide Town boards and commissions in their duties. The 
Commission was successful in making the Town one of eleven 
communities to get a Survey and Planning Grant to partially 
fund our project, with the balance coming from a successful 
application for a Community Preservation Grant from the 
Town. 

^ Randolph Historic Preservation Plan Project - Once the 
Commission secured the needed funds, they solicited proposals 
from across the region. Several companies responded, and after 
reviewing all the proposals, the Commission selected Eric Dray 
Associates of Provincetown, MA to research and develop a 
Historic Preservation Plan for the Town. Mr. Dray and his 
associates will work closely with Commission members and 
the Massachusetts Historical Commission, as well as the Town 
Planner to craft a plan that will help the Town to identify and 
manage its historic resources, and to develop a plan for 
preservation of significant buildings and other historic 
resources. In 2013, the contractor will be meeting with town 
departments and local residents in the development of the plan, 
and will make a final presentation of the report in May for 
acceptance by the Town Council as part of the Master Plan. 

^ Historical Wayside Markers for Powers Farm - in the spring of 
2012, the Town Planner requested the Commission's assistance 
in the development of historical wayside markers for the 
pathways at historic Powers Farm Park. The images, objects 
and captions were to be used by the company crafting the signs 
to guide them. Since the actual signs would not be ready in 
time for the opening of the Park on Memorial Day, the 
Commission crafted several temporary display boards for use 
on opening day. Today, the permanent markers are in place at 
the entrance to the park. The Historical Commission has also 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



begun work on two additional markers; one for on the history 
of North Randolph to be placed at the intersection of North 
Main and Old St, and one on the railroad and the boot and shoe 
industry near the former grade crossing on Warren Street. 
These signs will be installed sometime in 2013. 
^ Cataloging of Randolph's Civil War historical resources - In 
November, Commission member Lynn Feingold, assisted by 
Massasoit College student and Randolph resident Randi 
Marenburg, undertook the cataloging and organizing of the 
Town's Civil War era historical resources, including several 
manuscript volumes, six boxes of loose documents, and a box 
of letters belonging to the Randolph Historical Society. The 
collection of muskets and swords that came to the town by way 
of the Grand Army of the Republic at Stetson Hall have been 
cataloged and will be appraised for insurance purposes in early 
2013. 

^ Friends of Randolph History - Commission member Lynn 
Feingold set up the Friends of Randolph History page on 
Facebook as a way for disseminating local historical 
information and notices of Randolph history and preservation 
events being offered by the Historical Commission, the 
Historical Society, the Turner Free Library, and the Randolph 
Women's Club. It is hoped that plans can be developed through 
the Friends for a "museum without walls" concept for 
presenting Randolph's rich history to a diverse audience. 

The Commission regretfully accepted the resignation of D. Joseph 
Griffm in October. Joe had been on the Historical Commission for 
eighteen years, and also served as a member of Town Meeting, the 
Town Charter Committee, and the Stetson Hall Construction 
Committee, to name a few. We shall miss the experience and insights 
he contributed to our efforts, and wish him well in his retirement. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Randolph Historical Commission 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE STETSON SCHOOL 

FUND 

For Stetson Hall, 2012 was a year bracketed by community events, 
starting with the inauguration of the newly elected Town officials in 
early January and the Martin Luther King Day celebration. It 
concluded with the town's first annual Winterfest event and the 
Community Band's Holiday Concert. In between we had 15 
community meetings, workshops and visioning sessions by the Board 
of Health, the School Department, and other boards, commissions, and 
community groups. 

The past year saw the number of function rentals increase from 17 in 
2011 to 30 in 2012. These help to offset the operating costs of the hall, 
along with lease income from the first floor offices. 

One of the areas that has not developed as rapidly as the Trustees had 
hoped has been the development of Stetson Hall as a center for the 
performing arts, both locally and across the South Shore. Late in the 
fall, two local residents and the Community Arts Council have stepped 
forward to offer their assistance and expertise to help the Trustees 
develop the space as a performance venue. Additionally, the Hall is 
home to the Randolph Theater Company and the Randolph 
Community Band. 

As the year drew to a close, the Town was approached by the staff of 
Congressman Michael Capuano, seeking space in Randolph for a 
satellite office. The Trustees will be pleased to have such a 
distinguished tenant headquartered in Stetson Hall in 2013. 

To better promote Stetson Hall as a rental and meeting venue, the 
Trustees, working with local function planner Marcine Ricketts of 
M.O.R.Events developed a website and trifold brochure that has 
already received notice and rental queries both locally, and across the 
country. We thank Ms. Ricketts for her time, energy, enthusiasm and 
efforts on our behalf in producing the brochure and attendant website. 

Maintaining this magnificent building is a time and resource 
consuming challenge. Keeping the HVAC system operating in an 
efficient manner has taken up much of the Trustees time and money. 
This year also saw a new bill paying procedure come into use that pays 
the utiHty bills of several departments with a single check. While 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



perhaps more fiscally efficient, it also means that the Trustees are not 
able to review these bills on an ongoing basis to allow them to 
diagnose system problem before they compromise the efficiency of the 
system. The Trustees are working with the Town Manager's office to 
insure more timely transmission of invoice information to maximize 
operational efficiency. 

In addition to ongoing maintenance of building systems, the Trustees 
must also plan for more intermittent projects, including exterior repairs 
and painting. Areas not painted at the conclusion of the construction 
phase of the rehab project in 2009 will be addressed in the spring and 
summer of 2013. Window and shutter maintenance will also be 
addressed at this time, with new shutter hardware being installed that 
the Trustees hope will be more durable than the hardware that was 
originally installed 

Maintaining the building and the surrounding grounds is a team effort 
between the Trustees, the DPW, the Garden Club and others. The 
Trustees particularly thank the DPW for their efforts during the winter 
months to keep the driveways and parking lots free of snow and ice, 
and in the summer, to maintain the green spaces around the building, 
providing an attractive setting around an attractive building. 

In conclusion, the Trustees thank the people of Randolph for their 
continued support and ideas, and hope that 2013 will witness the 
continued growth and development of Stetson Hall as a cultural icon. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Henry Cooke, Chairman 
Ira Greene, Vice Chairman 
Joseph A. Mulligan, Jr., Clerk 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

REPORT OF THE COMMUNITY PRESERVATION 
COMMITTEE 

The Community Preservation Act (hereafter referred to as "CPA"), 
M.G.L. c. 44B, allows Massachusetts cities and towns to raise monies 
through a surcharge of up to 3% of the real estate tax levy on real 
property. In November 2004, Town Meeting voted a 2% annual real 
estate levy against real property which was ratified at the Annual 
Town Election April 5, 2005. Town Meeting accepted two 
exemptions from this surcharge as permitted by law: an exemption of 
$100,000 of the value of each taxable parcel of residential real 
property and an exemption for low income. 

These CPA funds are to be used for four core purposes: to acquire, 
create and preserve open space; to acquire, rehabilitate, restore and 
preserve historic resources; to create, preserve and support community 
housing; and to acquire, preserve and utilize land for recreational use. 
A minimum of 10% of the annual revenues of the fund must be 
appropriated for each of the three core community concerns. The 
remaining 70% can be allocated for any combination of the allowed 
uses, or for land for recreational use. 

Randolph's fiscal year 2013 CPA revenue of $600,000 was matched 
by the State in October 2012 at 20% and used to support the following 
projects: 

1) Historic Preservation 

The Historical Commission requested funding that would support 
the development of an historic preservation plan that could be 
incorporated into the Town's Master Plan for future reference. 
The completion of an historic preservation plan provides multiple 
benefits to our community including the completion of cataloging 
Randolph's historic properties, serving as a guide to prioritizing 
resources for ongoing historic preservation, facilitating application 
for funding through state and federal grant programs and providing 
a framework for potential bylaw amendments to adequately protect 
the Town's historic resources. The project received matching 
funds from a Massachusetts Historical Commission grant. 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

2) Congregational Church Clock Tower 

The Congregational Church at the comer of North and South Main 
Streets is one of the oldest churches in Randolph; the clock tower 
has been telling time since the early 1800s. Restoration of this 
iconic piece of Randolph's history funded through CPA would 
include the preparation, removal, transportation and refurbishing 
the three clock dials; priming of the metal numerals, minute 
markers and bands; and the preparation, priming, and painting of 
the clock hands. The church has taken on additional repairs to the 
fa9ade of the building. 

3) Belcher House 

The Belcher House located on the comer of North Main and West 
Streets is on the National Historic Register and has been 
maintained for the past 100 years by the Randolph Women's Club. 
CPA funding would facilitate repair to portions of the exterior and 
avoid irreparable loss to the building's historic materials, 
characteristic details and original architectural details. The work 
includes repairs and preservation treatments to prolong the life of 
the wood, siding, trim, windows, doors, roofs and foundation of 
the exterior restoration of the main house. North and South wings, 
the woodshed and carriage house. 

4) Town Planner 

The Town Planner position was recommended for funding for the 
second year of a three year commitment made by the CPC. This 
position is responsible for assisting in the implementation and 
leveraging of the Town's community preservation program 
working in collaboration with the CPC, Planning Board, Town 
Council and other boards and commissions. 

5) Bond Payments 

The Committee recommended the second payment on the 
borrowing approved at Town Meeting to purchase Powers Farm 
($800,000), the Rent Property ($425,000) and the Daly Property 
($175,000). This is the second of ten payments to payoff the bond. 
In addition, this includes the first payment on the interest (BAN) 
for the constmction of Powers Farm voted two years ago for 
$296,000. 



255 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
Looking Forward 

Historically, the CPC has received minimal funding requests for 
affordable housing. To that end, Committee spokespersons have 
initiated meetings with the Massachusetts Affordable Housing 
Alliance, Habitat for Humanity and connected with other CPA 
communities to evaluate options that could be initiated in Randolph. 
The Committee expects to propose projects for funding in the next 
cycle. 

Long-range funding is being evaluated for eventual purchase of 
additional open space parcels and the Committee's forms and 
applications are being redeveloped, rules and regulations updated and 
a public presence via the Town website established. 

Town Planner, Michelle Tyler 

Chairrhan, Brian P. Howard 

Town Council, William Alexopoulos 

Raymond Carson 

David Espinosa 

Gerald Good 

Ronald Lum 

Carline Olivier-Guerrier 

Mary West 



256 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

The Recreation Department's responsibilities are to verse the operation 
of recreational programming throughout the Town of Randolph. The 
Recreation Department administers adult and children programs, 
educational and athletic actives, trips and tours, special events and 
much more. In addition to our responsibilities include the operation 
and management of the Joseph J. Zapustas Ice Arena, the Randolph 
Community Pool, the Imagination Station Playground, Power's Farm, 
and The Randolph Theater Company 

Throughout the year the Recreation Department continued providing 
the following for the community; February and April School Vacation 
Programs for grades K-6, a Boys and Girls Youth Basketball League, 
an instructional K-2 basketball program, a Father/Daughter Dance, 
theater productions, swim lessons, water aerobics and most 
importantly summer camps for children aged 3-6, a camp for K-6th 
and as well a 6^^- 8^^ grade program . 

During the year, we welcomed a new Pool Director, Marianne 
MacDougall; as well as a new Program Coordinator, Robyn Rinehart, 
and a new Program Director Keri Sullivan. 

The Recreation Department would like to thank our staff including the 
seasonal summer staff, the Randolph Theater Company volunteers, as 
well as the Board of Recreation Members; Afrika Mills, Raymond 
Carson, Jamal Griffm, Ron Jackson, Katrina Huff-Lamond, and 
Debbie OuUette, Chairperson. Thank you all for volunteering your 
time and dedicating yourselves ensuring much success for our 
department 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Marc Craig 

Director of Community Programming 



257 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




Summer Recreation - 
This long standing program in Randolph has been a tradition. It is as popular now 

as it was in the 1960's 



259 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
REPORT OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

While the nation worked toward fiscal recovery, new large scale 
residential and commercial development in Randolph, as throughout 
the Commonwealth, was slow to respond. As such, the development 
of subdivisions and large commercial projects within our community 
was virtually non-existent. The Planning Board, however, continued 
efforts at reviewing and revising zoning bylaws and creating key 
documents to assist landowners, architects, engineers and others in the 
development of projects anticipating a return to spring/summer 
construction. Those have included a Site Plan and Design Review 
application with Design and Development Guidelines to support new 
zoning bylaws governing commercial development. 

The Planning Board with the Planning Department continued to 
identify opportunities for improvement in the processes that support 
development in the community and undertook efforts to streamline 
services and provide on-line access to forms and information and 
developed internal procedures to improve coordination and 
communication amongst Town departments. 

With fiscal recovery on the horizon, the Planning Board anticipates a 
busy year with reviewing construction plans and in the continued 
development of zoning bylaws and supporting procedures to support 
developmental review for commercial projects. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Alexandra Alexopoulos, Chair 
Maureen A. Dunn 
Patrick Harrison 
David Espinosa 
Peter Taveira 

Michelle Tyler, Planning Director 



260 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
REPORT OF THE TOWN CLERK & REGISTRAR 

The past year saw three state elections. Planning and organizing is 
critical to effectively running an election from start to finish, 
especially a Presidential Election. Hiring and training enough election 
workers, setting up four new precincts, educating and informing the 
public on where and how to vote while managing a voter list that 
includes thousands and thousands of changes due to voters being 
added, deleted or party changes, was a significant challenge. 

To better serve voters, I had 20 RHS students serve as poll workers 
and most spoke more than one language. The students also had great 
computer skills that helped assist voters by using a town-wide voter 
list in Excel on laptops provided by the Randolph Public Schools. 

This election cycle was particularly difficult as we had four new 
precincts and multiple polling location changes. Of 20,500 voters, 
almost 80% were affected by the changes. In addition, almost 25% of 
voters were inactive. To try and decrease the number of inactive 
voters and save financial resources, we did a limited second census by 
targeting households that had 2 or more registered voters. For 
example, if there were four inactive voters at a household, a second 
census was .45 cents to mail; versus $5.04 to mail four inactive 
mailing cards. We were as high as 6,000 inactive voters at one point, 
so that was a considerable savings. 

Under the umbrella of Assistant Town Manager, I worked on a 
number of projects including partnering with the May Center for job 
training programs for young adults on the Autism spectrum, met with 
Columbia Gas to find out how residents could switch to gas from oil, 
and served on the Comprehensive Emergency Management 
Committee. I try to make to make sure that all Town events that I help 
organize always project the community in a positive light such as the 
Memorial Day parade & ceremonies, the dedication of the George 
Mason Lovering Congressional Medal of Honor Stone, and the James 
Hurley Veterans and Senior Center. 

I take great pride that the Good Neighbor Guide was received very 
successfully by the public. It was also produced in multiple languages. 



261 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



This office handled the project from "soup to nuts" - writing, 
designing, editing, bidding and mailing the final copy to 11,500 
households. 

This office serves as the "main phone line" of Town government and I 
think we do a tremendous job whether in person, by email and/or 
phone with assisting the public, state agencies and other town 
departments. We assist everyone professionally. On that note, 

I would like to thank my office staff for their continued 
professionalism in meeting the needs of the public - 
Kristin McDonald, Cheryl Sass, Chris LaCerda and Betty Bertrand, 
a job well done! 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Brian P. Howard 
Town Clerk & Registrar 



262 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

The Assessors are required by Massachusetts Law to Hst and value all 
Real and Personal Property. Valuations are subject to ad valorem 
taxation on the assessment roll each year. The "ad valorem" basis for 
taxation means that all property should be taxed according to value. 
Assessed values in Massachusetts are based on full and fair cash value, 
or 100 percent of fair market value. Assessors are required to submit 
these values to the State Department of Revenue for certification every 
three years. Our next recertification will be for Fiscal Year 2014. In 
the years between certification, Assessors are required to do interim 
adjustments and maintain the values. The Town of Randolph must 
appraise and assess approximately 10,000 parcels of real estate and 
485 personal property accounts. The Assessors must maintain a 
detailed series of maps showing all parcel configurations for the Town. 
In addition, this department administers Motor Vehicle Excise. 

The Principal Assessor oversees all functions of the department 
including budget preparation, interacts with taxpayers regarding the 
abatement and exemption processes, and tax appeals. Reviews Income 
and Expense statements, sales verification reports and performs field 
work, and works with the Engineering Department in reviewing 
subdivisions. Assists the Board of Assessors in reviewing and 
researching information contained on abatement applications, and 
makes recommendations on such applications. Works with Tax 
Collector and the town's software vendor to make sure that tax bills 
are issued on time. 

The Assessors' office conducted a software conversion from Patriot 
Properties to Vision Government Solutions. Vision has modules for 
residential and income producing commercial properties, and features 
a custom designed report writer capable of assessing all of the data in 
the database, video imaging technology, and GIS software embedded 
directly into the CAMA system. This program also has the ability to 
publish the Town's assessing information on the web. Vision was 
chosen for their experience in the industry, their acknowledgement of 
their customers' changing needs; and re-engineered their business 
practices and software technology in order to meet the new 
requirements. 



263 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Calendar year 2012 saw a decrease in residential property values. The 
average single family home assessment dropped from $250,800 last 
year to this year's average of $235,600. The FY 2013 Interim Year 
Adjustment was conducted on all real estate and personal property. On 
November 30^^, the Board received final certification of the assessed 
values from the Massachusetts Commissioner of Revenue. 

At the Tax Classification hearing held on December 10^*^, the Town 
Council adopted a tax classification shift of 1.59%. This shift resulted 
in a residential tax rate for Fiscal Year 2013 of $17.35 per thousand 
dollars of assessed value. The resulting commercial/industrial tax rate 
for FY2013 is $30.73 per thousand dollars of assessed value. 

We would like to thank our staff, Ann Kent and Christine LaCerda, for 
their hard work and dedication over the past year. The efforts of our 
staff allowed us to accomplish each of our goals this year. We would 
also like to recognize and thank retired Chairman Joe Galvam for his 
many years of service on the Board of Assessors. 

Respectfully Submitted 

John A. Peppe, Board Member 
Robert Curran Jr. Board Member 
Jolanta R. Briffett, Principal Assessor 



264 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 
REPORT OF THE TREASURER/COLLECTOR 

As the year 2012 comes to a close, I would like to thank the residents 
and taxpayers for their continued efforts to pay Real estate, Excise and 
Utility taxes in such a tough economy. 

Bill pay on line and a collection box in the front of Town Hall has 
proved beneficial for our residents to do business seven days a week, 
twenty four hours a day. 

I would like to welcome our new Finance Director, Arti Mehta, and to 
see what new procedures and ideas will be put in place to maximize 
efficiency. 

A big thank you to my staff, Asst. Treasurer/Collector Jean Richard, 
Principal Clerk Pauline Sullivan, Principal Clerk Tawana Debraux, 
Senior Clerk Janet Teal, and part-time clerk Elizabeth Furey for their 
support and continued hard work to make changes to our procedures in 
the collection of taxes and the everyday operations of the office. 

In the New Year to come, I look forward to working with my fellow 
employees and am excited to see what new ideas evolve in 2013. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Loretta Owens 
Treasurer/Collector 



265 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



REPORT OF THE NORFOLK COUNTY REGISTRY OF 

DEEDS 

Report to the Town of Randolph 
WilUam P. O'Donnell, Register 

The Registry of Deeds is the principle office for real property records 
in Norfolk County. The Registry receives and records hundreds of 
thousands of documents each year, and is a basic resource for title 
examiners, mortgage lenders, municipalities, homeowners, and others 
with a need for land record information. 

The Registry operates under the supervision of the elected Register, 
William P. O'Donnell. In over two hundred years of continuous 
operation, the Registry's objectives have remained the same; to 
maintain the accuracy, reliability and accessibility of our communities 
land records for the residents and businesses of Norfolk County. 

Ongoing technology improvements, the security and management of 
records and increased levels of customer service remain areas of focus 
for the Norfolk County Registry of Deeds. Some of our recent and 
ongoing initiatives in 2012 include: 



• Register O'Donnell and his staff continue to visit town halls, 
senior centers and civic groups across Norfolk County. 
Register O'Donnell visited Randolph Town Hall on October 4^^ 
and the Randolph Council on Aging on February 1 ^\ 

• The full service telephone and walk-in Customer Service and 
Copy Center continues to provide residents and businesses of 
Norfolk County with quality customer assistance in all areas of 
Registry operations. 

• Multiple technological improvements were implemented in 
2012 including an upgrade of the Registry's server and the 
introduction of an improved Registry of Deeds website. The 
Registry's new website www.norfolkdeeds.org is regularly 
updated and enhanced to include recent news, resources for 



266 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



homeowners, real estate statistics and answers to frequently 
asked questions. 

• Our ongoing community programs; Suits for Success, the 
Annual Holiday Food Drive, Cradles to Crayons and Toys for 
Tots Collection were once again successful thanks to the 
generosity of Registry employees as well as many residents 
and businesses across Norfolk County. 

• Improvements to the physical and structural appearance of the 
historic Registry Building continued in 2012 with the 
installation of new energy efficient windows throughout the 
facility. 

• Electronic recording which allows for documents to be sent for 
recording via the internet has attracted interest from the real 
estate business community. 

• The internet library of images accessible to the public through 
the Registry of Deeds online research system at 
www.norfolkdeeds.org continues to expand. All documents 
back to the first documents recorded in Norfolk County in 
1793 are available for viewing online. 

Real estate activity in Randolph, MA during 2012 showed increases 
across most measurement categories with the exception of foreclosure 
deeds and notice to foreclose mortgage filings. 

There was a 17% increase in documents recorded by the Norfolk 
County Registry of Deeds for the Town of Randolph during 2012 at 
6,258 which was 1,624 more documents than the 201 1 total of 5,347. 

The total volume of real estate sales in Randolph during 2012 was 
$101,797,257.04 which showed a 29% increase over 2011. The 
average sale price of deeds over $1,000 (both residential and 
commercial properties) was up in Randolph by 4% in 2012 at 
$285,146.38 which showed a $9,679.97 increase from the 2011 
average. 



267 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

The number of mortgages recorded on Randolph properties in 2012 
was up 31% from 2011 at 1,201, while total mortgage indebtedness 
increased by 50% from $398,070,788.00 in 2012 to $266,479,904.00 
in 2011. 

The number of foreclosure deeds filed in Randolph during 2012 was 
down by 37%) at 64 filings compared to the 2011 total of 102, while 
the number of notice to foreclose mortgage filings decreased by 8 with 
135 filings during 2012 compared to 143 filings in 201 1. 

Finally, homestead activity was on the rise in Randolph during 2012 
with 415 homesteads filed representing an 8%) increase over the 2011 
total of 383. 

The modernization and business improvements that have enhanced our 
ability to provide first rate customer service to residents and 
businesses of Norfolk County will continue. I have been and always 
will be committed to an efficient customer service oriented operation 
here at the Registry. It is a privilege to serve as your Register of 
Deeds. 

Respectfully submitted by, 




William P. O'Donnell 

Norfolk County Register of Deeds 

649 High St., Dedham, MA 02026 




268 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



^^andolph 




Win 



Craw/ord Squariz - North Main §tr(20 

ib^\v/mn Warrizn & §. Main ^\v<;i^\) 

1:00 - 4:30pn} 

Pizrforwancds, crafts, activities, food, sfiopping & fun! 
Spizcial appfzarancizs by Santa &Mrs, Claas in tlifzir sijzigh! 
Join th(z KtlS band and stroU to thjz annual trf^fi lighting! 

Mor(Z information at www.townoJrandolpli.eom 



Presented in partnership fc— * 



269 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




Winterfest attendees stroll along North Main Street visiting businesses and street 

vendors 




Students from the JFK Elementary School are interviewed by Randolph Community 
TV while decorating the trees in the Enchanted Forest in the Turner Free Library 

270 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




Residents taking a holiday sleigh ride 




Warming up inside the Library, Winterfest attendees helped themselves to 
refreshments, and visited the Enchanted Forest and Mrs. Claus 



271 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




The High School band and chorus march into Tripe Hill Park to entertain the crowd 
with holiday music while awaiting the lighting of the trees 




Tripe Hill Park trees awash in blue and white lights culminating in a very successful 

first Annual Winterfest! 

272 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



IGS EARNINGS OTHER 

OVERTIME EARNINGS 
96 2760.77 6920.42 

.68 4676.08 


73 1821.75 
79 78.58 


25 4574.47 
72 5572.98 


05 2017.05- 
26 1008.48 


92 78.66 
26 11322.26 


70 

85 3456.99 


00 271.56 
70 1.48 


25 

05 702.42 


10 2460.00 
45 


02 331.20- 
00 911.00 


09 1508.48 
60 949.83 


83 490.01 1391.76 
26 3915.17 


54 1008.33 
00 3146.40 


04 2465.26 
78 126.07 23970.60 


in CM 

CM iH 


95 

35 250.00 


73 2689.35 
85 1860.00 


54 1545.00 


3 EARNIl 
JGS REG . 

15 45202, 

,76 64343. 


48 23848. 
37 74335. 


72 44604. 
70 87815. 


00 73524. 
74 58265. 


58 44361. 
52 58265. 


70 69931. 
84 93094. 


56 28713. 
18 52981. 


25 30530. 
47 69102. 


10 68183. 
45 71514. 


82 57883. 
00 34137. 


57 78862. 
43 55877. 


60 40852. 
43 73089. 


87 75768. 
40 73024. 


30 53833. 
45 22432. 


25 39233. 
12 50937. 


95 77472. 
35 87838. 


08 23848. 
85 42563. 


54 76105. 


EMPLOYEE GROS! 

NAME EARNIl 
ABERCROMBIE, ANTHONY 54884. 
ADAMEC, STEVEN 6 9019. 


AHOLA,JANE M 25670. 
ALAOUI, ALLISON E 74414. 


ALBRECHT,YOOK LING 49178. 
ALEXANDER- ELLIS, MAR 93388. 


ALLEN, REBECCA 71507. 
AMORIM,MARCIA M 59273. 


ANDERSON, DANIELLE N 4444 0. 
ANDERSON, LAURA A. 69587. 


ANDERSON, SPENCER L 69931. 
ARCIDIACONO, SHAWN 96551. 


ARVANITIDIS.GEORGEN 28984. 
ATA, NINA L 52983. 


AUTORINO, AMELIA 3 053 0. 
AZER,CARYN 69804. 


BABAIAN, VIRGINIA 70643. 
BABBITT, STEPHEN 71514. 


BAILEY MCCORMICK, JA 57551. 
BAKER, STACEY 35048. 


BAMBERG, SHARON 8 0370. 
BARBOUR, LOIS S. 56827. 


BARKLEY,CINDI L 42734. 
BARRY, PATRICE J 77004. 


BARRY , SHELLEY A 7 677 6. 
BARYSKI , TASHA J. 7 617 0. 


BASHMAKOVA,ANNA 56298. 
BEACH, RICHARD 46529. 


BEATSON, LINDA M. 39233. 
BEDROSIAN,MARTHA 50937. 


BELL, BONNIE 77472. 
BELLISTRI, DANIEL J 88088. 


BELYEA, DEBORAH A 2 6 538. 
BENSON, TAMMY 44423. 


BERGES , MARGARET E. 77 650. 



273 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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JGS EARNINGS OTHER 

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NAME EARNII 
BISHOP, ROBERT E 53220. 
BLAIS, AARON 39170. 


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274 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



<tGS EARNINGS OTHER 

OVERTIME EARNINGS 
10 250.00 
.65 6685.87 


66 407.35 
10 


36 3198.98 
92 


21 1760.37 
57 5731.63 6055.65 


65 531.48 
75 902.75 


87 1445.65 
64 2097.79 


92 3094.54 
50 205.21 


67 3146.40 
44 4436.15 


58 4188.99 
08 629.45 


72 7106.57 5187.79 
04 1620.00 


54 19619.29 
61 


89 9290.86 9278.10 
61 900.00 


57 250.00 
24 2350.00 


60 1090.00 
74 885.75 


01 2917.90 
96 6840.00 


80 1929.51 828.58 
25 


33 166.94 
99 2190.65 


73 1573.21 


3 EARNII 
TCS REG . 

10 68183 
.52 51400 


01 37392 
10 59180 


34 52445 
92 47499, 


58 98473, 
85 40798, 


13 51400, 
50 48473, 


52 98576, 
43 33197, 


46 79999, 
71 43809, 


07 66601, 
59 49553, 


57 68828, 
53 60518. 


08 45550. 
04 53833. 


83 76105. 
61 64844. 


85 46199. 
61 45178. 


57 55093. 
24 117500. 


60 44423. 
49 20725. 


91 73722. 
96 91999. 


89 42625. 
25 30854. 


27 71346. 
64 54161, 


94 23848, 


EMPLOYEE GROS; 

NAME EARNH 
CASEY, NANCY 68433 
CASEY, PATRICIA 58086 


CESARIO, CAROLINE E 37800 
CHAN, ANSON K. 59180, 


CHANDRAMOUL I , BHUVAN 55644, 
CHARDIN,MIRKO 47499. 


CHASE, KELLY 100233. 
CHICCO,GUY 52585, 


CHIN, AMY 51932, 
CICCKETTI , TARA K. 49376, 


CIVIAN,HELENANN 100022. 
CLAPP, KATHLEEN A 352 95, 


COBB, CHRISTINE 83094, 
COLBURN , BETHANY L 44014, 


COLELLA,BRIANNE 69748, 
COLLINS, KRISTEN 53989, 


CONETTA, JASON 73017, 
CONNOLLY, DONNA M 61147, 


CONNOLLY, GEORGE F. 57845, 
COTTER, MATTHEW R. 55453, 


COTTON, JOSEPH 95724, 
COUTURE, THERESA A 64844, 


CRAWFORD, CHRISTOPHE 64768. 
CRAWFORD, MARCIA L 46078. 


CRIBBY, JENNIFER A 55343. 
CRON, RUSSELL S 119850. 


CRONIN,JOHN J 4 5513. 
CROOKS, SAMUEL C. 21611. 


CROWELL, JEYASHANTI 7 663 9. 
CUDMORE, JOANNE 98839. 


CULHANE, KATHLEEN 45383. 
CULLINAN, CHRISTOPHE 30854. 


CULLY, DIANE 71513, 
DALY, FAITH 56352, 


DECELLE, JOANNE L 25421, 



275 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




276 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



rcS EARNINGS OTHER 

OVERTIME EARNINGS 
75 1944.40 
,33 559.00 


92 412.96 
84 3337.11 


95 1069.40- 
53 4953.31 


75 

60 772.50 


55 2123.82 
54 4832.20 


84 1900.00 
26 2302.00 


72 

95 983.50 


75 4987.11 
20 2100.00 


32 943.92 
96 2100.00 


04 1252.46 
25 1186.46 


71 801.70 
95 


76 

60 3400.00 


19 3311.69 
33 


26 5218.70 
25 4006.09 


12 

59 2862.76 


04 1048.50 
04 923.52 941.00 


56 44.04- 
01 8261.19 


67 3880.77 


S EARNII 
>IGS REG . 

15 32040. 
.33 71346. 


88 65407. 
95 46603. 


55 77472. 
84 75546. 


75 56167. 
10 5217, 


37 62623. 
74 63061. 


84 94999. 
26 58265. 


72 61715, 
45 77472. 


86 45238. 
20 102393. 


24 57833. 
96 104999. 


50 37623. 
71 30530. 


41 29937. 
95 77472. 


76 23477. 
60 78167. 


88 65715. 
33 57001. 


96 58265. 
34 30530. 


12 32665, 
35 74439, 


54 53833, 
56 31035, 


52 38509. 
20 73722. 


44 66601, 


EMPLOYEE GROS; 

NAME EARNII 
FITZGERALD, MAUREEN 33985 
FITZROY, STACY L 71905 


FLAHERTY, JUDITH 65820. 
FLANIGAN, ELAINE M 4 9 940, 


FLYTHE -SANDS, KELLY 7 64 03, 
FOLAN,DAWN 80499, 


FOLEY, JULIE 56167, 
FONG, ELIZABETH 5990 


FONTAINE, PIERRE 64747, 
FORBES, MELINDA 67 8 93. 


FRANK, JOSHUA 96899. 
FRANZESE, JUSTEEN S. 60567. 


FRATTASIO, JENNIFER 61715. 
FREELEY, JOANNE 7 84 56. 


FREITAS, CHRISTINE E 50225, 
FRYE, KATHLEEN 1044 93. 


GALVIN, LAUREN M 58777, 
GANNON, BETH A. 107099. 


GARCIA, MARIA D. 38875, 
GARDNER, JAMIE 31716, 


GASPER, JESSICA 30739, 
GEREMI A, KATHRYN E. 77472, 


GERVINO, DIANA N 23477, 
GILLIN,DIANNE 81567, 


GILLIS, TRACY 69026, 
GODBOUT, DAVID 57 001. 


GOITIA,ERIN 63483. 
GOLDBERG, T,K AH 34536. 


GOLDMAN , STEPHEN E 32665. 
GOOD, LINDA L 77302. 


GREENBERG, MEGHAN 54881. 
GREENE, ALYNNE 32899. 


GUENARD,GRACELYN 38465. 
GUERRA, JOHANNA M. 81983. 


GURECKIS, JENNIFER 70482, 



277 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



JGS EARNINGS OTHER 

OVERTIME EARNINGS 
00 4102.68 

.09 5632.50 


00 974.06 
05 ' 772.50 


75 346.88 
59 250.00 


25 1311.00 
80 770.00 


60 3477.99 
01 2831.76 


08 

22 3133.93 3063.75 


73 6598.26 3181.54 
25 39.33 


82 6239.00 
76 6539.59 3190.78 


00 3418.50 
77 4800.33 8218.65 


75 2687.00 
41 6686.94 


60 902.24- 
20 1615.50 


23 250.00 
62 6533.26 


25 

10 843.50 


96 2100.00 

65 


41 1405.65 
65 1527.50 


25 2442.80 
15 11564.48 


65 78.66 

00 


65 4186.55 


3 EARNII 
IGS REG. 
68 7668 
.59 78862. 


06 28633. 
55 73524. 


63 54512. 
59 74770. 


25 30530. 
80 36334. 


59 78167. 
77 73722. 


08 60518. 
90 44525. 


53 44959. 
58 30530. 


13 64538. 


50 34137, 
75 45919. 


75 48473. 
35 54504. 


36 78167. 
70 55775. 


23 78509. 
88 45004. 


25 30530. 
60 81852. 


96 104999. 
65 51400. 


06 51942. 
15 51400. 


05 16656. 
63 18218. 


31 51518. 
00 33642. 


20 51400. 


EMPLOYEE GROS! 

NAME EARNII 
HALPENNY, COURTNEY 11770. 
HANLEY, SHEILA M 84494. 


HANSEN, ERIC 29607. 
HARDY, AMY 74296. 


HARJULA, GREGORY 54 85 9. 
HARRINGTON, ANN S 75020. 


HASKELL, MEGAN 31841. 
HAWKO, KATHLEEN A 37104. 


HAZELL, CHARLOTTE 8164 5. 
HENDERSON, MARY P. 76553. 


HENDERSON, PATRICIA 60518. 
HENNESSEY, MICHAEL T 50722. 


HENNESSEY, PATRICK T 54739. 
HERRICK, EMILY A. 30569. 


HERTZEL, LILLIAN E. 78914. 
HILL, DAVID E 74269. 


HINKELL,ALYSSA 37555. 
HINTHORNE, WILLIAM R 58938. 


HINZ, GREGORY 51160. 
HOK,TIVICHHEKA 61191. 


HOLLAND, SUSAN 77265. 
HOLLAND, TANYA M 57390. 


HOLLERAN,ANN B 78759. 
HOLMES, KATE 51537. 


HOROWITZ, DAVID 3 053 0. 
HOROWITZ, STUART 82695. 


HOSMER,SARA 107099. 
HOWARD, MARISSA L. 51400. 


HUDNALL,KELLEY E. 53 348. 
HUFF,JENNA L. 52928. 


HUYNH -THAI, TAYLOR 19099. 
HUYNH, TAYLOR 29782. 


JENKINS DJOM,KATHER 51597. 
JOHNSON , CEPHUS 33642. 


JOHNSON, SARAH S. 55587. 



278 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



'JGS EARNINGS OTHER 

OVERTIME EARNINGS 
00 6250.00 
.54 4195.42 


54 4194.50 
54 


54 5860.00 
75 5722.52 


00 

00 6627.80 500.00 


20 

25 1077.22 


50 

50 622.82- 


54 3594.82 
15 5023.87 5357.03 


25 

00 3146.40 


04 461.00 
84 39.50 


03 5669.00 
79 8596.23 


92 

04 3913.44 


72 843.50 
79 6730.47 


60 2260.26 
54 16763.90 


02 

59 9602.20 


10 808.25 
16 613.15 


50 1099.50 
50 


96 2100.00 
15 5444.28 4156.67 


09 2375.32 


S EARNH 
1GS REG. 

00 56100 
.96 76105 


04 76105 
54 76105 


54 76105 
27 48473 


00 24282 
80 59006 


20 77130 
47 31760 


50 30124, 
68 32059, 


36 28829. 
05 45261, 


25 30530. 
40 56100. 


04 53833. 
34 59566. 


03 71377. 
02 75515. 


92 107624. 
48 53833. 


22 61715. 
26 54727. 


86 42390. 
44 76105. 


02 56375. 
79 74770. 


35 68183. 
31 46388. 


00 37065. 
50 43971. 


96 104999, 
10 44876. 


41 74553. 


EMPLOYEE GROSI 
NAME EARNIl 
JONIECARI 62350 
KAMINSKI,LISA 80300 


KAPLAN, PAUL L 80300 
KAPLAN, STAGEY M 7 6105 


KAYE,JILL 81965 
KEANE, ERICA 54196 


KEEGAN, COURTNEY 242 82 
KELLY, LAWRENCE 6 613 3, 


KENNEDY, ALISSA 77130, 
KEWESHAN, JESSICA 32837. 


KHAN,YASMIN 30124. 
KHOSLA,LYNN 31436. 


KILLION,DARLENE 32424. 
KILMURRAY, DAVID 55 642. 


KING, RYAN 30530. 
KING, SUSAN E. 59246. 


KINGSLAND, SANDRA 54294. 
KINGSTON, KATHLEEN 59606. 


KOWALSKI , REBECCA 77046, 
KRAY, FERNANDA M. 84112, 


KUE,YEU 107624. 
LADD, MARGARET R. 57746, 


LANDRETH , CARLA 62559, 
LAPRADE,ERIC M. 61458, 


LAURENT , SHI RLEY 44650, 
LECLAIR, STEPHEN T 92869. 


LEE, EDWARD 56375. 
LEONARD , PATRI CK 84372. 


LETOURNEAU,CHRISTIN 68991. 
LEVINE, LESLIE S 47001. 


LOLLI, JANICE 43971. 


LOPES, MARIA 107099. 
LOPES, MARK 54477. 


LOPEZ, HENRY 76928. 



279 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



JGS EARNINGS OTHER 

OVERTIME EARNINGS 
61 250.00 
.25 3955.00 


64 1372.26 
08 117.99 


25 117.99 
90 1187.84 


59 

05 3716.68 


92 2016.96 
57 12095.47 5108.52 


95 5058.92 
02 4863.59 


93 5297.75 

90 


73 1369.70 
57 3074.20 


87 5110.64 
44 1937.41 


48 34.80 
30 470.00 


70 1514.97 
00 245.75 


88 

20 940.00 


50 500.00 
72 1687.50 


76 6105.19 1960.78 
61 


73 2305.03 
73 1372.00 


12 

84 1460.55 4948.14 


90 

59 367.99 


32 2517.25 


3 EARNII 
JGS REG. 
61 64844. 
.25 43703. 


90 33197, 
07 70532. 


24 30530. 
74 34318. 


59 74770. 
73 46183. 


88 65407. 
56 45091, 


87 77472, 
61 39961. 


68 59342, 
90 62183, 


43 23848, 
77 55093, 


51 51330. 
85 59816. 


28 76571, 
30 40088, 


67 76308, 
75 56100, 


88 48499. 
20 47000. 


50 51057. 
22 60874. 


73 64538. 
61 64844. 


76 23848. 
73 23848. 


12 42500. 
53 37851. 


90 42435. 
58 74439. 


57 23696. 


EMPLOYEE GROS! 

NAME EARNII 
MACDONALD, LISA J 65094. 
MACDONALD, WILLIAM 47658. 


MACNEILL,ANN P 34569. 
MACOMBER , SHERRI 7 06 50. 


MACPHERSON,CATHERIN 30648. 
MAGUIRE.HAYLEY 35506. 


MAHER, MICHAEL 74770. 
MAHONEY, ELIZABETH 49899. 


MAHONEY, KEVIN 67424, 
MALONEY, JAMES J 62295, 


MALVESTI, LOUIS P. 82531, 
MANNIX, JAYMEE C 44824, 


MANOS,ERIKA 64640, 
MARCUS, STEPHANIE 62183, 


MARILI, ELAINE R 25218. 
MARKARIAN, SCOTT 58167. 


MARSHALL, KYLE 56441, 
MARSIGLIANO,HUI NIN 61753, 


MARTENS, DAWN M. 76606, 
MASSEY, JACQUELINE 4 0558, 


MATTA, ANDREA S 77823. 
MCCABE, KATHLEEN 56345. 


MCCRACKEN, GAYLE 484 99. 
MCDONOUGH , BARBARA 47 940. 


MCGRATH, MELISSA A 51557. 
MCHUGH,SUSANNE M. 62562. 


MCMILLAN, JOEL T 72604. 
METTHE, CHERYL 64 844. 


MILLER, KAREN A 26153. 
MILLIEN- JANVIER, RAC 25220. 


MILLS, AFRIKA AFENI 42500. 
MONAGHAN, JOHN P. 44260. 


MONTAVON,MICHELE C. 42435. 
MONTGOMERY, SHARON L 74807. 


MOORE, ALYSSA 26213. 



280 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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<IGS EARNINGS OTHER 

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.84 4680. 
.80 2302. 


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68 123391. 
.80 70022, 


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NAME EARNII 
MOORE, STEVEN 128072. 

MOORE, THOMAS W 72324. 


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281 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 







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OVERTIME EARNIK 

,20 617. 
.73 1241. 


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.14 79917, 

.29 23848. 


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EMPLOYEE GROS! 

NAME EARNII 
PAQUETTE, LINDA A 80535. 
PARKS, VALERIE D 2 5090, 


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282 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



DTHER 
3ARNINGS 
152.21 
1790.49 


1217.61 
4910.49 


5089.47 


1348.36 
2255.28 
1787.35 


2130.00 
3747.78 
3138.16 


940.48 


983.26 
117.99 


1833.56 
912.61- 


5864.88 


2586.70 
512.39 


617.99 
6570.57 


1400.00 
2706.21 


364.04 


6472.00 


6946.31 
1545.00 


3284.05 


477.58 


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5 EARNII 
fGS REG. 

95 76359 
.78 77688 


02 51942 
02 82438 


37 50982 
80 70022 


93 24519 
87 74770 
08 23848 


20 49923 
20 57407 
55 50019 


70 52297, 
73 50942, 


77 50292, 
50 49383, 


29 23848, 
21 67209, 


76 152249. 
89 73722. 


43 23848. 
93 76105. 


00 73722. 
09 52801. 


72 66730. 
03 72675. 


43 50019. 
50 38000, 


00 56100, 
54 76105, 


35 53833, 
66 74680, 


50 34787, 
89 55071, 


62 53833, 


fEE GROS! 
E EARNII 
30N, REBECCA L 76511 
liESLIE G 79478 


KRISTEN 53160 
MONA L 87349 


^,TRICIA M. 56072, 
)PF, SUSAN 70022, 


)N,LISA 29829, 
I-HORGAN,SUSAN 77025, 
:KI,6aNUTA 25636, 


JOSEPH 52053, 
IICHELLE J. 61155, 
'CIO, AMY 53157, 


rOSEPH A. 52297. 
KATHRYN J. 51882. 


)N,LISA M. 51275. 
ISON, SARAH 49501. 


:R,ELISE 25682. 
ID, ALPHA M. 66297. 


>, OSCAR 152249. 
DAWNA M 7 9586. 


aTZ,BRENDA I. 26435. 
:RS, SHARON 76617. 


3I,DIANNE 74340. 
.iBERG, IRENE F 59372. 


f II, BRIAN J 68130. 
JANE 75382. 


ALYSSA 50383. 
COW, BARBARA J 38000. 


CE, MEGAN E. 62572, 
STEIN, FREDDA R 76105. 


:R,LERA a. 60779, 
»OHL,JILL 76225, 


)N, BONNIE 34787, 
ILEIB, KAREN L. 58355, 


ALLYSON W. 54310, 


EMPLOI 
NAM 
ROGERS 
ROOS, I 


ROSEN, 
ROSEN, 


ROSSM? 
ROTHKC 


ROUTSC 
RUDDEI 
RUDNI C 


RUFFO, 
RYAN,^ 
SACCOC 


SAIA,,; 
SALAS , 


SAMPSC 
SANDEI 


SANDLI 
SANFOI 


SANTOS 
SARES, 


SARNOV 
SAUNDI 


SCAFII 
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scull: 

SEARS, 


SEETO, 
SELENI 


SESESI 
SHARPS 


SHAWVI 
SHEA -I 


SHELTC 
SILVEI 


SIMES, 



283 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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OVERTIME EARNIt 
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.73 3124. 


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.50 56100 
.68 23848, 


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NAME EARNII 
SIMMONS, LONNIE W. 57887. 
SINCLAIR, PATRICIA A 26973. 


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284 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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UGS EARNINGS OTHER 
OVERTIME EARNIJ 
.37 1234. 
.59 1160. 


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.89 33032 
.62 74770 


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NAME EARNII 
TOPHAM, LAURA 34266, 
TOROSIAN, ELIZABETH 75930, 


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285 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




286 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 





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.74 8378 


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.06 71584, 
.48 46055, 


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EMPLOYEE GROS: 
NAME EARNII 
ABRAMSON.MARC 123928. 
ALDRED, KEVIN 54434 


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287 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



^GS EARNINGS OTHER 

OVERTIME EARNINGS 

37 

.96 33.51 11804.92 


42 700.00 
12 43.05 10974.58 


92 63868.78 

95 


68 750.00 

92 


90 

56 943.16 45137.67 


52 16977.29 
83 14827.56 


52 4.48 2557.54 
52 9074.28 


15 607.92 44419.24 
26 313.61 26705.22 


00 2708.12 79242.34 
52 15163.12 


43 

41 10870.95 


29 844.45 20800.22 
33 2189.03 68269.19 


25 15691.65 
37 59545.45 


54 2061.91 68969.57 
71 27536.63 


52 16179.42 
52 14698.49 


58 4251.50 
64 18723.07 


99 1012.90 76535.30 
65 1791.32 


52 21071.13 
77 2318.93 103372.35 


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3 EARNI 1 
TOS REG . 

37 57387, 

,39 53474, 


42 45012. 
75 69521, 


70 51455. 
95 58800. 


68 46590. 
92 51040, 


90 53382. 
39 67451. 


81 55244. 
39 80771. 


54 61651. 
80 55244. 


31 69763. 
09 58430. 


46 86864. 
64 55244. 


43 72033. 
36 53463. 


96 75986. 
55 67764. 


90 115111. 
82 44603, 


02 72488, 
34 64283, 


94 55244, 
01 55244, 


08 51032, 
71 55211. 


19 85717, 
97 55382. 


65 55244, 
05 78959, 


00 36857, 


EMPLOYEE GROS! 

NAME EARNIl 
CRAIG, MARC 57387, 
CROCKETT, ALFRED G. 6 5313. 


CRONIN, CAROL 4 5712. 
CROWLEY, NEIL 8 538. 


CRUZ, MIGUEL 115324. 
CUNNINGHAM, JOHN MIC 58800. 


DARCHE, CHERYL A 47 340. 
DEBRAUX , TAWANA ANN 51040. 


DISHAROOM,CAPREE C. 53382. 
DONNELLY, KEVIN 113 532. 


DONOVAN, KEVIN L 72221. 
DONOVAN, RICHARD F 95599. 


DOYLE JR,JOHN J 64213. 
EATON, BRUCE E 64318. 


ELMAN, STEVEN M 1147 90. 
EMBERLEY,KRISTEN W 85449. 


EMERSON, ROBERT 168 814. 
EVANS, THOMAS G 7 04 07. 


FABRIZIO, GEORGE 72033. 
FEDRICK, ROBERT J. 64334. 


FISHER, JASON M 97630. 
FLAHERTY, BRIAN G 138222. 


FOLEY JR., CHARLES D 130802. 
FRANCIS, FLOYD J 104148. 


FRAZIER, GLENN B 143520. 
FREW, PAUL C 91820, 


GEARY, DANIEL E 71423. 
GIBBS, PATRICK W 69943. 


GLASSMAN, STEVEN P. 55284, 
GORDON, JOSEPH W 73934, 


HAMELBURG, JOHN J 163266. 
HAMELBURG, MICHELLE 57173, 


HARTE,CHERI E 76315, 
HAYWARD, JAMES P 184651. 


HEALEY, KENNETH 36857. 



288 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



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ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 




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292 



RANDOLPH DEPARTMENT HEADS 



Front row, left to right: Kathleen Steiger, Exec. Dir. of Randolph 
Housing Authority, Sara Slymon, Library Director, Michelle Tyler, 
Town Planner, Linda M. Sproules, Administrative Assistant to the 
Town Manager, Anne M. Barkhouse, Administrative Assistant to 
the Town Manager, Loretta Owens, Town Treasurer-Collector, and 
Arti Mehta, Finance Director 

Back row, left to right: Charles D. Foley, Jr., Fire Chief, Brian P. 
Howard, Town Clerk/Registrar, Marc Craig, Director of 
Community Programs, George Fabrizio, Building Commissioner, 
Oscar Santos, Superintendent of Schools, David C. Murphy, Town 
Manager, Robert F. Sullivan, In-house Town Counsel, William 
Pace, Chief of Police, Arthur Sullivan, Commander RPD, Stephen 
Slavinsky, Animal Control Officer, John McVeigh, Director of 
Public Health, and John "Mike" Cunningham, Veterans Agent